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French 202 in INGR-122 (MWF 11:15-12:20): Intermediate French

Prof: Mark Jensen
Office: ADMN-220
Phone: (253) 535-7219
E-mail: jensenmk@plu.edu
Web page: www.plu.edu/~jensenmk/
Office hours: MWF 3:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

Materials

Required purchase:

      • Miquel, Claire.   Vocabulaire progressif du français avec 280 exercices: Niveau débutant.  Second edition.  CLE International, 2010; ISBN 9782090381269.
      • Nachtmann, Francis W.  Exercises in French Phonics.  Stipes Publishing, 1981; ISBN 9780875632155.
      • Oukada, Larbi, Didier Bertrand, & Janet Solberg.   Controverses.  Third edition.  Cengage Learning, 2016; ISBN 9781305390980.
      • Oukada, Larbi, Didier Bertrand, & Janet Solberg.  Controverses: Cahier d'activités.  Third edition.  Cengage Learning, 2016; ISBN 9781305105799.
      • Simenon, Georges.  L'affaire Saint-Fiacre.  Presses de la Cité/Livre de poche, 2003; ISBN 9782253142935.

Course goals

This course completes an intermediate French sequence that began in the fall with French 201, which also used the 3rd edition of Controverses and the 2nd edition of Miquel's Vocabulaire progressif du français: Niveau débutant, as well as Nachtmann's Exercises in French Phonics.

Most work in this class will be in French.  With infrequent exceptions like this syllabus, communication will be in French.  The classroom is a French-language zone (une zone de langue française) except in exceptional circumstances, like a major convulsion of the Cascadia subduction zone or the collapse of the European Union.  Remember, however, that you can always say something like Comment dit-on « earthquake » en français ? or Qu'est-ce que « effondrement » veut dire [en anglais] ? (or Que veut dire « basculer » ?).  Even more effectively (and increasingly the French themselves are availing themselves of this option), you can turn the English word you're thinking of into a French noun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition, conjunction, or interjection, modified in a way that is morphologically appropriate.  How do you say managed ?  Why, managé, of course!  Who said learning French was such un challenge ?

The goals of French 202 are the same as those of 201:

First, to enlarge your vocabulary in French in a systematic fashion; to improve the accuracy of your French pronunciation; to help you master elements of grammar essential to communicating effectively in French; to develop your ability to speak and write correctly; and to deepen your awareness of cultural, social, and intellectual dimensions of communication in French.

Second, French 202 seeks to give you: insights into the background and values of Francophone cultures, especially metropolitan French culture, with a special emphasis in this class on the life and work of Georges Simenon.

Third, this course aspires to enhance your ability to present your reasoning effectively in French and your ability to analyze and compare ideas and opinions, both your own and those of others, through contemplation of authentic works and discussion of them; to deepen your acquaintance with conventions of genre, the influence of history and society, and the progress of ideas, and, though this is difficult in second-year French, to practice challenging assumptions intellectually, reflecting upon different perspectives, evaluating and explaining different viewpoints on complex issues, and defending judgments.  Intensive work with the French language at this level will also give you new perspectives on your own mother tongue and will also stimulate your reflection on language itself.  Should you succeed in doing all these things, you will be way ahead of the instructor and you can proceed directly to GO and collect $200 (worth 182.60 euros on January 15, 2016, the date I began preparing this, but 184.44 euros on January 26, 2016, the date I finished).

During the fourteen weeks of this course, you will 1) work through the final four chapters of a second-year French textbook, the second half of a systematic review of elementary practical French vocabulary, and the second half of a review of the principles of French phonetics; 2) read a detective novel (un roman policier) by Georges Simenon; 3) watch thirteen short episodes of a recent satirical TV French cartoon series for adults based on a BD (bande dessinnée) entitled Silex and the City (in English in the original, how chic).  Along the way, you'll do countless exercises, plan, write, and revise four compositions, make a couple of class presentations, engage in a 30-minute conversation with a French-speaking interlocutor living in another country, and take a midterm and final exam.

As in 201, activities in class will vary in a monotonously predictable yet somehow reassuring weekly fashion.

On Mondays and Wednesdays we'll cover the last four chapters in Controverses. On those days, class will have four parts: (1) Vocabulary, based on two or four pages from Vocabulaire progressif du français. You're responsible for mastering all the words and expressions that appear in bold-faced print.   (2) Phonetics, based on material in Exercises in French Phonics, which you should bring to class.  (3) Grammar, based on material presented in Controverses: Cahier d'activités that you should go over before class, as well as additional materials supplied in class.  (4) Conversation, based on study of material in Controverses.   You should prepare all of these before class and bring all four of these books to class on Mondays and Wednesdays.

Fridays will be devoted to literature:  a detective novel by Georges Simenon, L'affaire Saint-Fiacre, which we will study in great detail all semester long, and an episode of Silex and the City.  We'll begin, though, as on Mondays and Wednesdays, by spending a few minutes going over some pages in Miquel's Vocabulaire progressif du français.

Note that you'll have an assignment to prepare for almost every class.  On Wednesdays and Fridays, you'll hand an exercise or two from Controverses: Cahier d'activités (see below, after the class calendar, for the schedule of assignments). Every Monday in class, a composition-related assignment will be due — either the final version of the composition (Step 3), a preliminary draft (Step 2), or a series of sentences stating the arguments you plan to make and to respond to in your composition (Step 1).  This process is described in more detail below.

Another element of the class will be all-in-French conversation with a native French speaker who lives abroad.  The conversation will be conducted through a web-based service called Talk Abroad, which started up about six years ago and is now used by more than one hundred universities.  You'll be required to pay for a single half-hour conversation with an individual, whom you'll choose, and at a schedled time, which you'll schedule on your own.   This conversation will complement the theme — immigration — of Chapter 7 of Controverses, which we'll be studying then.  You should schedule this conversation by Apr. 11, for a time between Apr. 18, and Apr. 22.  We'll discuss your conversations in class during the following week, on Apr. 25 and 27.  The Section Code you should use on this website to schedule your conversation is Jense2016-669538.   The cost to you for this element of the class is around $20.  To complete a conversation, you'll need  to log into your TalkAbroad account using the Google Chrome browser, and you'll be prompted to enter a conference room.  Your conversation partner will record the conversation and later upload it to the website, where I'll be able access it and listen to it.   You can cancel and reschedule your conversation up to 12 hours before the conversation time.  You'll make some written notes on the conversations that you can refer to when you discuss your experience in class, but these notes will not be handed in and there is no additional written assignment connected with this part of the course.

Class schedule

Mon., Feb. 8

  • (1) Introductions and what sociologist Erving Goffman (not French) would call presentations of self.  (2) Discussion of course, study methods, and expectations for the course—yours and mine. Some English, for the sake of clarity.  (3) Review exercises.   

Wed., Feb. 10

  • (1)  Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 80-81.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §27.  (3) Cahier, pp. 140-41.  (4) Controverses, pp. 148-50.

Fri., Feb. 12

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 82-83.  (2) Introduction to Simenon, L'affaire Saint-Fiacre ; on p. [3], read the short paragraph about Simenon's life.  (3) Silex and the city : Votez Blog!

Mon., Feb. 15

  • NO CLASS: PRESIDENTS DAY.

Wed., Feb. 17

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 84-85.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §28.  (3) Cahier, p. 142.  (4) Controverses, pp. 148-50 (continued).

Fri., Feb. 19

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 86-87.  (2) Read Simenon, L'affaire Saint-Fiacre, Chapter 1, and the notes on the chapter; also prepare (orally) answers to the comprehension questions handed out in class on Wednesday.  (3) Silex and the city : L'enfance de l'art.

Mon., Feb. 22

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 88-89.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §29.  (3) Cahier, pp. 150-51.  (4) Controverses, pp. 157-59.

Wed., Feb.. 24

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 90-91.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §30.  (3) Cahier, pp. 152-53.  (4) Controverses, pp. 157-59 (continued).

Fri., Feb. 26

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 92-93.  (2) Simenon, L'affaire Saint-Fiacre, Ch. 2, and the notes on the chapter; also prepare (orally) answers to the comprehension questions handed out in class on Wednesday.  (3) Silex and the city : Alterdarwinisme.

Mon., Feb. 29

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 94-95.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §31.  (3) Cahier, p. 159.  (4) Controverses, pp. 161-63.

Wed., Mar. 2

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 96-97.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §32.  (3) Cahier, pp. 167-69.  (4) Controverses, pp. 180-81.

Fri., Mar. 4

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 98-99.  (2) Simenon, L'affaire Saint-Fiacre, Ch. 3, and the notes on the chapter; also prepare (orally) answers to the comprehension questions handed out in class on Wednesday.  (3) Silex and the city : Aristo-Sapiens.

Mon., Mar. 7

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 100-01.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §33.  (3) Cahier, pp. 171-73.  (4) Controverses, pp. 180-81 (continued).  ALSO: INDIVIDUAL STUDENT PRESENTATIONS.

Wed., Mar. 9

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 102-03.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §34  (3) Cahier, pp. 177-78.  (4) Controverses, pp. 189-90.  ALSO: INDIVIDUAL STUDENT PRESENTATIONS.

Fri., Mar. 11

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 104-05.  (2) Simenon, L'affaire Saint-Fiacre, Ch. 4, and the notes on the chapter; also prepare (orally) answers to the comprehension questions handed out in class on Wednesday.  (3) Silex and the city : Le remplaçant.

Mon., Mar. 14

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 106-07.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §35.  (3) Cahier, pp. 181-82.  (4) Controverses, pp. 189-90 (continued).  ALSO: INDIVIDUAL STUDENT PRESENTATIONS.

Wed., Mar. 16

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 108-09.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §36.  (3) Cahier, pp. 185-86.  (4) Controverses, pp. 192-93.  ALSO: INDIVIDUAL STUDENT PRESENTATIONS.

Fri., Mar. 18

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 110-11.  (2)  Simenon, L'affaire Saint-Fiacre, Ch. 5, and the notes on the chapter; also prepare (orally) answers to the comprehension questions handed out in class on Wednesday.  (3) Silex and the city : Des hominidés et des dieux.

Mon., Mar. 21

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 112-13.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §37.  (3) Cahier, pp. 188-89.  (4) Controverses, pp. 192-93 (continued).  (5) Midterm review. 

Wed., Mar. 23

  • MIDTERM EXAM.

Fri., Mar. 25 - Sun., Apr. 3

  • NO CLASS — Spring break.

Mon., Apr. 4

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 114-15. (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §38.  (3) Cahier, pp. 195-96.  (4) Controverses, pp. 210-11.

Wed., Apr. 6

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 116-17. (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §39.  (3) Cahier, pp. 199-202.  (4) Controverses, pp. 210-11 (continued).

Fri., Apr. 8

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 118-19.  (2) Simenon, L'affaire Saint-Fiacre, Ch. 6, and the notes on the chapter; also prepare (orally) answers to the comprehension questions handed out in class on Wednesday.  (3) Silex and the city : Ma biodiversité va craquer.

Mon., Apr. 11

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 120-21.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §40.  (3) Cahier, p. 204.  (4) Controverses, pp. 220-21.

Wed., Apr. 13

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 122-23.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §41.  (3) Cahier, p. 207.  (4) Controverses, pp. 220-21 (continued). 

Fri., Apr. 15

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 124-25.  (2) Simenon, L'affaire Saint-Fiacre, Ch. 7, and the notes on the chapter; also prepare (orally) answers to the comprehension questions handed out in class on Wednesday.  (3) Silex and the city : Théorie de l'évaluation.

Mon., Apr. 18

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 126-27.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §42.  (3) Cahier, p. 209-10.  (4) Controverses, pp. 223-25.

Wed., Apr. 20

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 128-29.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §43.  (3) Cahier, pp. 214-15.  (4) Controverses, pp. 223-25 (continued).

Fri., Apr. 22

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 130-31.  (2) Simenon, L'affaire Saint-Fiacre, Ch. 8, and the notes on the chapter; also prepare (orally) answers to the comprehension questions handed out in class on Wednesday.  (3) Silex and the city : Les homéo-sapiens.

Mon., Apr. 25

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 132-33.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §44.  (3) Cahier, pp. 225-26.  (4) Controverses, pp. 241-42.  ALSO: DISCUSSION OF TALKABROAD CONVERSATIONS.  

Wed., Apr. 27

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 134-35.  (2)   Exercises in French Phonics, §45.  (3) Cahier, pp. 229-30.  (4) Controverses, pp. 241-42 (continued).  ALSO: DISCUSSION OF TALK ABROAD CONVERSATIONS.

Fri., Apr. 29

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 136-37.  (2) Simenon, L'affaire Saint-Fiacre, Ch. 9, and the notes on the chapter; also prepare (orally) answers to the comprehension questions handed out in class on Wednesday.   (3) Silex and the city : Century 21 000 avant J-C.

Mon., May 2

  • (1) Vocabulaire pratique, pp. 138-39.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §46.  (3) Cahier, p. 232.  (4) Controverses, pp. 249-51. 

Wed., May 4

  • (1) Vocabulaire pratique, pp. 140-41.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §47.  (3) Cahier, pp. 235-37.  (4) Controverses, pp. 249-51 (continued).  

Fri., May 6

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 142-43.  (2) Simenon, L'affaire Saint-Fiacre, Ch. 10, and the notes on the chapter; also prepare (orally) answers to the comprehension questions handed out in class on Wednesday.   (3) Silex and the city : Homoanalysis.

Mon., May 9

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 144-45.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §48.  (3) Cahier, p. 243.  (4) Controverses, pp. 252-53.  ALSO: STUDENT PRESENTATIONS.

Wed., May 11

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 146-47.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §§49.1-49.4.  (3) Cahier, p. 245.  (4) Controverses, pp. 252-53 (continued).  ALSO: STUDENT PRESENTATIONS.   

Fri., May 13

  • (1) Vocabulaire progressif, pp. 148-49.  (2) Simenon, L'affaire Saint-Fiacre, Ch. 11, and the notes on the chapter; also prepare (orally) answers to the comprehension questions handed out in class on Wednesday.  (3) Silex and the city : La planète des stages.

Mon., May 16

  • (1) Review.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §§49.5-49.13.  ALSO: STUDENT PRESENTATIONS.    

Wed., May 18

  • (1)  Review.  (2) Exercises in French Phonics, §§49.14-49.15.  ALSO: STUDENT PRESENTATIONS.

Fri., May 20

  • (1) Review.  (2) Simenon: General discussion of the novel.  (3) Silex and the city : Le propre de l'homme.

Wed., May 25, 11:00 a.m.-12:50 p.m.

  • FINAL EXAM.

Workbook exercise schedule

The Cahier d'acitivités includes presentations of French grammar followed by exercises.

The pages assigned should be studied before class.  In class, additional material and exercises will be distributed.  After class, the assigned workbook exercises should be turned in to me in class on the dates indicated below.  Doing the exercises involves writing out or typing the exercises, producing complete sentences on a separate piece of notebook paper that you will turn in to me in class.  (Alternatively, you can write answers on the workbook pages, detach them from the workbook, and hand them in.  Unfortunately, however, there is usually not enough room to write either your answers or my corrections, so while there is no penalty for choosing this option, it is less desirable because my necessarily curtailed corrections will not be as useful to you.)  For exercises that ask you to fill in a blank or otherwise complete a given text, please write both the text given in the exercises and your own answers.  Not acceptable are lists of the answers to the exercises handed in on a piece of notebook paper; these may be returned uncorrected.

  • Fri., Feb. 12. Turn in exercise #2 on pp. 143-44 of the Cahier.
  • Fri., Feb. 19. Turn in exercise #7 on pp. 148-49 of the Cahier.
  • Wed., Feb. 24. Turn in exercise #11 on p. 153 of the Cahier.
  • Fri., Feb. 26. Turn in exercise #16 on p. 157 of the Cahier.
  • Wed., Mar. 2. Turn in exercise #20 on pp. 159-60 of the Cahier.
  • Fri., Mar. 4. Turn in exercises ##1 & 2 on p. 170 of the Cahier.
  • Wed., Mar. 9. Turn in exercise #3 on p. 173 and exercise #9 on p. 176 of the Cahier.
  • Fri., Mar. 11. Turn in exercises #10 & 11 on pp. 178-79 of the Cahier.
  • Wed., Mar. 16. Turn in exercise #15 on pp. 182-83 of the Cahier.
  • Fri., Mar. 18. Turn in exercise #19 on p. 187 of the Cahier.
  • Wed., Apr. 6. Turn in exercise #5 on pp. 198-99 of the Cahier.
  • Fri., Apr. 8. Turn in exercises #10 on pp. 203-04 of the Cahier.
  • Wed., Apr. 13. Turn in exercise #14 on p. 206 of the Cahier.
  • Fri., Apr. 15. Turn in exercise #16 on pp. 208-09 of the Cahier.
  • Wed., Apr. 20. Turn in exercise #17 on p. 211 and exercise #21 on p. 213 of the Cahier.
  • Fri., Apr. 22. Turn in exercise #23 on p. 215 and exercise #29 on p. 217 of the Cahier.
  • Wed., Apr. 27. Turn in exercise #4 on p. 228 of the Cahier.
  • Fri., Apr. 29.  Turn in exercise #7 on pp. 231-32 of the Cahier.
  • Wed., May 4. Turn in exercise #9 on p. 234 (first part only, not the part on p. 235) of the Cahier.
  • Fri., May 6. Turn in exercise #17 on p. 241 of the Cahier.
  • Wed., May 11. Turn in exercise #19 on p. 244 of the Cahier.
  • Fri., May 13.  Turn in exercises #21 on pp. 245-46 of the Cahier.

Schedule of compositions

NOTE:  Compositions are an important element of this class.  Each of the four compositions you'll write for this class will be completed in a three-step process that you may not have used before, following principles explained on pp. 15-19 of Controverses that you should review.  Each of these three steps culminates in a piece of work to be handed in on Monday, in class:
  • On the first Monday of the cycle (Feb. 22, Mar. 14, Apr. 11, and May 2) you'll choose a thesis, reflect upon it, and present, in French, in the form of brief but complete sentences, six arguments relating to your thesis.  Three of these arguments will support your thesis, and three will oppose it or qualify it in some way.  (You'll rebut or confront these arguments when you write the composition).  
  • On the second Monday of the cycle (Feb. 29, Mar. 21, Apr. 18, and May 9) you'll hand in a first draft that develops the arguments in favor of the thesis and rebuts or confronts the arguments against the thesis.   You’ll also add an introduction, a conclusion, and appropriate transitions.  
  • On the third Monday of the cycle (Mar. 7, Apr. 4, Apr. 25, and May 16) you'll produce a final corrected version of your composition.

The work you hand in each Monday will, Deo volente, be returned to you in class on Wednesday, with a grade and comments.  IMPORTANT NOTE:  Of the grades you receive during this three-step process, note that only the grade for the final corrected version will count toward your final grade.

EACH COMPOSITION, THEN, IS A THREE-PART ASSIGNMENT ABOUT A CONTEMPORARY CONTROVERSIAL TOPIC.  HERE, IN DETAIL, IS HOW YOU SHOULD APPROACH THE FIRST COMPOSITION:

For Mon., Feb. 22, after reading through the topics relating to the common good and individual freedom that are proposed in Section B: Questions de discussion on pp. 165-66 of Controverses, choose the one most interesting to you.  Then develop (1) a thesis statement, (2) (3) (4) three reasons that support your thesis, and (5) (6) (7) three counterarguments that rebut, confront, qualify, or otherwise cast doubt upon your thesis.  (You'll develop responses to these counterarguments in the following week.  In this first step of the process, though, don't try to develop the counterarguments.  Simply state them.  Also, there’s no need to invent a title at this stage of the process.  Please triple-space your work and leave large margins of at least three centimeters on all sides and a margin of six centimeters between the top of the first page of your text and your name, "Français 202," and the date, in French, of course.

For Mon., Feb. 29, develop your earlier work into a first draft of your composition.  State your thesis in an introductory paragraph.  Develop your three arguments in favor of your thesis, giving each of them a separate paragraph.  Then write three additional paragraphs introducing the counterarguments that attempt to rebut or qualify the thesis, showing why the counterarguments are more or less misleading, wrong, weak, irrelevant, illogical, misguided, or otherwise dubious, but admitting what seems true of value that you find in them.  Give each of these discussions of a counterargument a separate paragraph.  Finally, add a concluding paragraph that restates a version of your thesis.  This should be one that is somehow modified from the original statement in light of the discussion of the counterarguments: this is what Oukada et al. mean by a "dialectical" approach.  This first full draft of your composition should, like the assignment for the previous week, be triple-spaced, with margins of at least three centimeters on all sides and a margin of six centimeters between the top of the first page and your title, name, "Français 202," and the date, all in French, of course.

On Mon., Mar. 7, hand in a final version of your composition, also triple-spaced, correcting as best you can the errors and weaknesses of your first draft.

Following the same work plan, you’ll write three additional compositions. The second composition will address globalization.  The subject of the third will be immigration's benefits and drawbacks.  The fourth composition will be about language and society. 

FOR CONVENIENCE, HERE'S A SUMMARY OF ALL THE MONDAY COMPOSITION ASSIGNMENTS

Feb. 22:  As explained in detail above, choose a subject relating to individual freedoms and the common good from among the ones suggested on pp. 165-66 of Controverses in the section « Questions de discussion ».  State your thesis and summarize the three arguments you’ll use to support it as well as the three counterarguments you’ll rebut.  This is a short assignment:  a sentence or two for the theses and each of the arguments or counterarguments is all you need at this stage.

Feb. 29:  First draft due in class.

Mar. 7:  Final version due in class.

Mar. 14:  Choose a subject relating to globalization from among the ones suggested on p. 197 in the section « Sujets de discussion ».

Mar. 21:  First draft due in class.

Apr. 4:  Final version due in class.

Apr. 11:  Choose a subject relating to immigration's benefits and disadvantages from among the ones suggested on p. 226 in the section labeled « Questions de discussion ».

Apr. 18:  First draft due in class.

Apr. 25:  Final version due in class.

May 2:  Choose a subject relating to language and society from among the ones suggested on p. 256 in the section « Discussion ».

May 9:  First draft due in class.

May 16:  Final version due in class.

* * *

Calculation of grades

Your grade will be determined as follows:

    • 20% Participation
    • 15% Workbook exercises
    • 20% Four compositions
    • 15% Two in-class group presentations and one in-class Talk Abroad conversation report
    • 10% Midterm exam
    • 20% Final exam (Wed., May 25 from 11:00 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.)
Comments on each of these components:
Class participation
Attendance and participation are essential.  Your attendance and participation will affect your grade.  Your participation will be evaluated after every class.  You will receive either 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 for each class.  Zero means you were absent; 1 means either that you did not bring needed materials, or would or could not participate; 2 means that you didn’t participate much or were inadequately prepared; 3 means that you participated in “ordinary” fashion in class activities; and 4 means that you were well prepared and made notable efforts to communicate in French.  At the end of the course the average of these scores will be calculated.
Workbook exercises
The workbook exercises will graded and handed back.  It is your responsibility to monitor the assignments on this site and to keep up with the exercises that are due.  As explained above, exercises can either be written out on notebook paper or prepared on a word processor and printed out (the entire exercise, not just the answers), or they can be written on the pages of the Cahier, detached, and handed in.  In either case, a physical piece of paper should be turned in to me in class.  No electronic submissions are acceptable.  
Compositions
Your compositions may be handwritten or prepared on a word processor and printed.  In either case, they should be submitted triple-spaced, with wide 1.2-inch margins (3 cm) on all sides of the page, as described above.  NOTE: As for the workbook exercises, a printed, physical copy must be turned in to me in class. No electronic submissions are acceptable.  If for some reason you are unable to hand in a composition in class, late submissions should be place in my mailbox in ADMN-220, preferably before 5:00 p.m. on the day on which they are due.  The first and second drafts of compositions will be returned with a grade, but as explained above, only the grade on the final version counts toward your course grade.
Student presentations
As described above, you'll work with one or two partners on two in-class presentations, one to be presented between Mar. 7 and Mar. 16, and one presented between May 9 and May 18.  You'll also be responsible for an informal account of your Talk Abroad conversation, presented in a discussion format on Apr. 25 or Apr. 27.  Your performance in these all-in-French performances will determine 15% of your grade.
Comprehensive tests
There will be a mid-term exam on Wed., Mar. 23, which will cover the vocabulary in chapters 15-20 of Vocabulaire progressif du français, the grammar in chapters 5-6 of Controverses, §§27-37 of Exercises in French Phonics, and Chapters 1-5 of L'affaire Saint-Fiacre by Georges Simenon.  This exam will count for 10% of your final grade.  A final exam (May 25 at 11:00 a.m.) will cover the vocabulary in chapters 15-28 of Vocabulaire progressif du français, Chapters 5-8 of Controverses, §§27-49 of Exercises in French Phonics, and the entirety of Simenon's novel.  The final exam will count for 20% of your final grade.

NOTE: Students must not cheat or plagiarize, and they must not condone these behaviors or assist others who plagiarize.  This includes reliance on machines (i.e. computers or the web) to translate from English to French.  Academic misconduct jeopardizes the career of the individual student involved, and also undermines the scholastic achievements of all PLU students in the sense that it attacks the mission of this institution.  Students are responsible for doing their own work, thereby insuring the integrity of their academic records.  In addition, civil conversation is central to the university's academic enterprise and guided by faculty expertise.  The university is committed to protecting the rights of community members to engage in dialogue and express ideas in an environment that is free from harassment, discrimination, and exploitation.  This freedom of expression does not, however, entail the freedom to threaten, stalk, intimidate, harass, or abuse.  Students are therefore expected to treat every individual with respect and civility.  (See Student Code of Conduct, p. 12)  An additional note:  If you need course adaptations or accommodations because of a disability, if you have emergency medical information to share with me, or if you need special arrangements in case the building must be evacuated, please make an appointment with me as soon as possible.  If you have questions concerning the services available for students with disabilities at PLU, please contact the Office of Disability Support Services, x7206.

          BONNE CHANCE ET BON COURAGE !

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