Military Careers - www.careersinthemilitary.com - Lets you explore military careers for either enlisted or officer personnel. It also has links to each branch of service.


ARMY - www.goarmy.com


ARMY NATIONAL GUARD- www.nationalguard.com


NAVY - www.navy.com


AIR FORCE - www.airforce.com


MARINES - www.marines.com


COAST GUARD - www.gocoastguard.com



Military information - www.military.com -Largest military website with a lot of helpful information. The information listed below is sample of the type of information available on the this site:


Are You Eligible to Join the Military?

Eligibility rules can be a little confusing. There are different rules for enlisting and for officer programs. 


Enlisting: Enlisted members do the hands-on work of the military. They need at least a high school degree (a GED may or may not suffice). 

Officer: Officers are the managers of the military. Most officer programs require a college degree at minimum, and are very competitive. Many officers have master's or higher degrees.

Before you visit your local recruiter, be sure you meet the minimum qualifications for serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. Some qualifications are required by all five services:

·         You must be a U.S. citizen or resident alien.

·         You must be at least 17 years old (17-year old applicants require parental consent).

·         You must (with very few exceptions) have a high school diploma.

·         You must pass a physical medical exam.

For each branch, there are slightly different enlistment requirements:

 

To join the...

You must:

Air Force

·         Be between the ages of 17-27. *

·         Have no more than two dependents.

·         Pass the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude test. (Minimum AFQT Score: 50)

Army

·         Be between the ages of 17-34. *

·         Have no more than two dependents.

·         Pass the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude test. (Minimum AFQT Score: 31)

Coast Guard

·         Be between the ages of 17- 39*

·         Have no more than two dependents.

·         Pass the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery test. (Minimum AFQT Score: 45)

·         Have a willingness to serve on or around the water.

Marines

·         Meet exacting physical, mental, and moral standards.

·         Be between the ages of 17-29. *

·         Pass the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery test. (Minimum AFQT Score: 32)

·         Women are eligible to enlist in all occupational exception of combat arms specialties: infantry, tank and amphibian tractor crew.

Navy

·         Be between the ages of 17-34. *

·         Pass the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test. (Minimum AFQT Score: 50)

·         Women are eligible to enlist in all occupational fields, with the exception of serving in the Navy Seals or on submarines.


* Age limits vary based on active-duty, prior service, or reserve. In addition, 17-year old applicants require parental consent.

 

Your ASVAB scores determine what jobs you will qualify for in the military.

But before you embarrass yourself in front of active duty service members, know that a job in the Army and the Marine Corps is called an MOS, which is an acronym for Military Occupational Specialty. In the Air Force, jobs are called AFSC – Air Force Specialty Code. In the Navy and Coast Guard, jobs are called ratings, or rate for short.


ASVAB and Army Jobs

Jobs in the Army are called Military Occupational Specalties (MOS). To find the jobs you qualify for, the Army breaks down your ASVAB subtest scores into groups known as line scores. The ASVAB subtests are: General Science (GS); Arithmetic Reasoning (AR); Word Knowledge (WK); Paragraph Comprehension (PC); Numerical Operations (NO); Coding Speed (CS); Auto and Shop Information (AS); Mathematics Knowledge (MK); Mechanical Comprehension (MC); Electronics Information (EI); and Sum of Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension (VE). Note that as Numerical Operations (NO) and Coding Speed (CS) subtests are phased out, some line scores may be changed.

Note: The data listed here is subject to change and is only an example of how ASVAB Scores are related to job selection for the Army.

Army Line Scores:

CL - Clerical: VE+AR+MK

CO - Combat: AR+CS+AS+MC

EL - Electronics: GS+AR+MK+EI

FA - Field Artillery: AR+CS+MK+MC

GM - General Maintenance: GS+AS+MK+EI

GT - General Technical: VE+AR

MM - Mechanical Maintenance: NO+AS+MC+EI

OF - Operators and Food: VE+NO+AS+MC

SC - Surveillance and Communications: VE+AR+AS+MC

ST - Skilled Technical: GS+VE+MK+MC

 

ASVAB and Air Force Jobs

 Jobs in the Air Force are called Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC). To find what jobs you qualify for, the Air Force breaks down your ASVAB subtest scores into groups known as qualification areas. The ASVAB subtests are: General Science (GS); Arithmetic Reasoning (AR); Word Knowledge (WK); Paragraph Comprehension (PC); Numerical Operations (NO); Coding Speed (CS); Auto and Shop Information (AS); Mathematics Knowledge (MK); Mechanical Comprehension (MC); Electronics Information (EI); and Sum of Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension (VE).

* Note that as Numerical Operations (NO) and Coding Speed (CS) subtests are phased out, some qualification area scores may be changed.

Note: The data listed here is subject to change and is only an example of how ASVAB scores are related to job selection for the U.S. Air Force.

The four qualification areas are:

Qualification Area

ASVAB Subtests

G - General

Verbal Expression (WK plus PC) and Arithmetic Reasoning (AR)

M - Mechanical

Mechanical Comprehension (MC), General Science (GS) and 2 times Auto & Shop Information (AS)

A - Administrative

Numerical Operations * (NO), Coding Speed * (CS), and Verbal Expression (WK plus PC)

E - Electrical

Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Electronics Information (EI), and General Science (GS)

ASVAB and Navy Jobs

Jobs in the Navy are called "Ratings" or “Rate” for short. To find the rating you qualify for, the Navy looks at your ASVAB subtest scores - different subtests for different ratings. The ASVAB subtests are: General Science (GS); Arithmetic Reasoning (AR); Word Knowledge (WK); Paragraph Comprehension (PC); Numerical Operations (NO); Coding Speed (CS); Auto and Shop Information (AS); Mathematics Knowledge (MK); Mechanical Comprehension (MC); Electronics Information (EI); and Sum of Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension (VE). Note that as Numerical Operations (NO) and Coding Speed (CS) subtests are phased out, scoring rules for ratings will be changed.



10 Tips For Visiting the Recruiting Office

 

Recruiters are honest, well-trained, committed professionals. Meeting a recruiter should be an informative, stress-free experience. These 10 tips will make sure you're prepared for your interview.

1. Have No Fear. Remember you are under no obligation when speaking to a recruiter. You may be asked to sign paperwork before taking the ASVAB and possibly at other steps in the process. This is standard procedure so don't be alarmed.  The enlistment process is involved and takes time; you have the ability to change your mind at anytime before you sign the final enlistment contract.

2. Go with Someone. You may feel more at ease if you take a friend, parent or someone else you trust.

3. Know the ASVAB. You may be able to get the job you want, but to do so you must score well on the Armed Service Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB).  But the ASVAB alone doesn't guarantee you'll get the job you want. Military job selection is also based on other specified criteria, such as physical fitness, eyesight, security requirements, and education level.

Keep in mind the job you want may not be available at the time you are joining. In this case, you may want to wait until there is an opening for the job you want. Depending on how important the choice of a particular branch is to you, consider the possibility that another service may be able to offer you the job you want or maybe there's a similar job available.

4. Be stationed where you want. Some services have programs where they can guarantee your first duty station. Be sure to ask!  But remember after your first unit, you could end up serving anywhere.

5. Get paid more. If you have special training or education, you may qualify to join at a higher rank and pay.  Some examples include Junior ROTC, Eagle Scout and Civil Air Patrol. Ask the recruiter. 
6. Choose your start date. Use the Delayed Entry Program to your advantage, tell your receruiter the earliest date you are able to go to basic training!

7. Choose your commitment.  The shortest enlistment contract requires a commitment of two years active duty and four years in the inactive reserve. The standard enlistment contracts are 4 or 6 years of active service followed by an inactive reserve commitment.

8. Correct the contract before signing. Typos and errors can create problems. Make sure the contract is right before you sign it.

9. Get it in writing. Guarantees such as MOS, bonuses and the College Fund must be reflected in the enlistment contract.

10. Remember you're signing up to be a Soldier, Airman, Sailor, Marine or Coast Guardsman. It is important that you are honest with your recruiter. Don't hesitate to ask questions. You should work to get the job you want, but understand that your role as a servicemember comes first. Be honest with yourself; serving in the military is not like a regular job. You can't just quit when the going gets tough. The military requires diligence, dedication and acommitment to teamwork. Remember, your actions could potentially cost or save lives.

Bonus Tip: The Buddy Deal. Some Services have programs where friends who sign up together can go through training together, be stationed together or even start with advanced rank and pay just because you sign up together.