Homework

 


Monday, November 4, 2013: Wordly Wise #5 spelling and Vocabulary 
Quizzes.  Also, current events are due.

Friday, November 1, 2013 Poetry Project begins for all three 
sixth grade classes and all projects are due on Friday, 
November 22, 2013.

Thursday, October 31: Grammar (Nouns)
  • person, place, thing or idea
  • Collective nouns
  • Compound Nouns
  • Common and Proper Nouns

Wednesday, October 30: Reading Logs  
 
Tuesday, September 24, 2013 
Read for 30 or more minutes and complete the Reading Logs
 
Complete Wordly Wise Lesson 3 due Monday, September 30
 
Study for next Friday's Wordly Wise vocabulary and spelling
assessment.
 
Social Studies Project due October 14.  I will reconfigure the project
 specs and provide a hard copy of the assignment.
 
 
 
 
Thursday, September 12, 2013
 
Reading/Language Arts:
  • Study the Wordly Wise Word list and all
  • of the vocabulary words for each spelling word.
     
  • Complete the Wordly Wise Lesson 2 packet due
  • September 20.
     
  • Read for 30 or more minutes and complete the reading log.
 
Social Studies: Go to my menu bar and select Social Studies. 
Once on on that page watch the videos, read the Five Themes of
Geography Project and read the rubric and the subsequent detailed
information about each of the five themes.  The project begins on
September 13 and is due on September 27.
 
Social Studies:Latitude and Longitude worksheets: "Picture It" and
"What Will They Be." 
 
 
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
 
Reading/Language Arts: Study the Wordly Wise Lesson 2 spelling
word list and make sure to study all of the vocabulary words for each
spelling word.
 
Read for 30 minutes or more and complete the reading log
 
Monday, August 19, 2013:

List 5 consequences for misbehavior in Mr. Davis' Classroom (Mrs. Payne's Class and Ms. 
Bartlow's Class). 

Tuesday, August 20, 2013:

List 5 consequences for misbehavior in Mr. Davis' Classroom (Mr. Davis' Class).

Study class procedures and rules (Mrs. Payne's Class and Ms. Bartlow's Class)

 

I have compiled a list of famous African American scientists, engineers, mathematicians 

and technology gurus for my most current history paper.  I will place numbers in a 

container that represent each one of these famous contributors to history and students 

will randomly select a number.  The number they select is the person they will feature.

 

Dr. Shirley Jackson

Philip Emeagwali

Lewis Latimer

Jan Matzeliger

Elijah McCoy

Garrett Morgan

Daniel Hale Williams

 

 

 

David Crosthwait

Patricia Bath

Meredith Gourdine

Bessie Coleman

Valerie Thomas

Lonnie G. Johnson

George Alcorn

Dr. Charles Drew

George Crum

Benjamin Banneker

Dr. Mark Dean

Ernest Just

Percy Julian

Imhotep

Bessie Blount Griffin

Dr. Mae Jemison

Madam CJ Walker

Ben Carson

James West

Marie Maynard Daly

Prof. Samuel Massie Jr.

Emmett Chappelle

George Washington Carver

Marie Brown

Susie King Taylor

Susan McKinney Steward

James McCune Smith

William Augustus Hinton

Rebecca Lee Crumpler

Mary Eliza Mahoney

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Dads, I'm feeling it--I know you are too!!!  This is the day we
have to bring our A game!!! 
 
Science Homework for 2/14/13
 
Please bring empty tissue boxes and paper towel rolls to
class on Tuesday, February 19.  Thanks.
 
Science Homework for 2/13/13
 
All Classes: Study for Chapter Test "Characteristics of  Waves" on Wednesday,
February 20. The assessment will cover seismic waves, transverse waves,
longitudinal waves, interaction of waves and properties of waves.  Study the
following diagrams: figure 2 on page 8, figure 3 on page 9, figure 4 on page 10,
figure 5 on page 12, figure 7 on page 18, figure 8 on page 19, figure 9 on
page 20, figure 10 on page 21 and figure 11 on page 22.    

All Classes: African American History Paper due 2/26/13

 
Mr. Davis' Class: Complete Reviewing Key Concepts'
questions on page 111, 1a-c, 2a-b and 3a-c.
 
Mrs. Allen's Class: Study Chapter 2, lessons one and two
 
Mrs. Cooper's Class: Study Chapter 2, lessons one and two.
 
 
Science Homework for 2/7/13
 
  • Mr. Davis' Class: Read Chapter 2, lesson 3 "Music," pages 48-52, 1a-b, 2a-c and 3a-c
  • Mrs. Cooper's Class: Read pages 26-29 "Seismic Waves" and answer the review questions underneath the section assessment.
  • Mrs. Allen's Class: Read Chapter 2, lesson 2, "The Properties of Sound" and answer the questions at the end of the lesson.

 
  
Sixth Grade Strive For Five Position Paper: A strive for five assignment is given over five days.  Here is the agenda for the five days:
  1. Organize your thoughts on the first day using an outline or graphic organizer such as a foursquare.
  2. Draft your paper using your organizer as a guide.
  3. Revise your rough draft.  Use editorial marks to correct your paper. Highlight all capital letters, circle all end punctuation marks, check spelling and make sure your subjects and verbs agree in number.  Remember to vary your sentence beginnings and use your thesaurus to strengthen your word choice. 
  4. Proof your work and rewrite your paper.  Make sure all guidelines are followed for this position paper. 
  5. Publish your paper.
What is a position paper?        

Like a debate, a position paper presents one side of an arguable opinion about an issue. The goal of a position paper is to convince the audience that your opinion is valid and defensible.  It is very important to ensure that you are addressing all sides of the issue and presenting it in a manner that is easy for your audience to understand. Your job is to take one side of the argument and persuade your audience that you are an authority on the topic being presented. It is important to support your argument with evidence to ensure the validity of your claims, as well as to refute the counterclaims to show that you are well informed about both sides.

 Organization

Sample Outline

I. Introduction
___A. Introduce the topic
___B. Provide background on the topic to explain why it is important
___C. Assert the thesis (your view of the issue). More on thesis statements can be found below.

Your introduction has a dual purpose: to indicate both the topic and your approach to it (your thesis statement), and to arouse your reader’s interest in what you have to say. One effective way of introducing a topic is to place it in context – to supply a kind of backdrop that will put it in perspective. You should discuss the area into which your topic fits, and then gradually lead into your specific field of discussion (re: your thesis statement).

II. Counter Argument
___A. Summarize the counterclaims
___B. Provide supporting information for counterclaims
___C. Refute the counterclaims
___D. Give evidence for argument

You can generate counterarguments by asking yourself what someone who disagrees with you might say about each of the points you've made or about your position as a whole. Once you have thought up some counterarguments, consider how you will respond to them--will you concede that your opponent has a point but explain why your audience should nonetheless accept your argument? Will you reject the counterargument and explain why it is mistaken? Either way, you will want to leave your reader with a sense that your argument is stronger than opposing arguments.

When you are summarizing opposing arguments, be charitable. Present each argument fairly and objectively, rather than trying to make it look foolish. You want to show that you have seriously considered the many sides of the issue, and that you are not simply attacking or mocking your opponents.

It is usually better to consider one or two serious counterarguments in some depth, rather than to give a long but superficial list of many different counterarguments and replies.

Be sure that your reply is consistent with your original argument. If considering a counterargument changes your position, you will need to go back and revise your original argument accordingly.

For more on counterarguments visit: http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/argument.html

III. Your Argument
___A. Assert point #1 of your claims
_____1. Give your educated and informed opinion
_____2. Provide support/proof using more than one source (preferably three)
___B. Assert point #2 of your claims
_____1. Give your educated and informed opinion
_____2. Provide support/proof using more than one source (preferably three)
___C. Assert point #3 of your claims
_____1. Give your educated and informed opinion
_____2. Provide support/proof using more than one source (preferably three)

You may have 3 overall points to your argument, but you should not have fewer.

IV. Conclusion
___A. Restate your argument
___B. Provide a plan of action but do not introduce new information

The simplest and most basic conclusion is one that restates the thesis in different words and then discusses its implications.

 

Transitions

In academic writing your goal is to convey information clearly and concisely, if not to convert the reader to your way of thinking. Transitions help you to achieve these goals by establishing logical connections between sentences, paragraphs, and sections of your papers. In other words, transitions tell readers what to do with the information you present them. Whether single words, quick phrases or full sentences, they function as signs for readers that tell them how to think about, organize, and react to old and new ideas as they read through what you have written.

Transitions signal relationships between ideas. Basically, transitions provide the reader with directions for how to piece together your ideas into a logically coherent argument. They are words with particular meanings that tell the reader to think and react in a particular way to your ideas. In providing the reader with these important cues, transitions help readers understand the logic of how your ideas fit together.

LOGICAL RELATIONSHIP

TRANSITIONAL EXPRESSION

Similarity

also, in the same way, just as ... so too, likewise, similarly

Exception/Contrast

but, however, in spite of, on the one hand ... on the other hand, nevertheless, nonetheless, notwithstanding, in contrast, on the contrary, still, yet

Sequence/Order

first, second, third, ... next, then, finally

Time

after, afterward, at last, before, currently, during, earlier, immediately, later, meanwhile, now, recently, simultaneously, subsequently, then

Example

for example, for instance, namely, specifically, to illustrate

Emphasis

even, indeed, in fact, of course, truly

Place/Position

above, adjacent, below, beyond, here, in front, in back, nearby, there

Cause and Effect

accordingly, consequently, hence, so, therefore, thus

Additional Support or Evidence

additionally, again, also, and, as well, besides, equally important, further, furthermore, in addition, moreover, then

Conclusion/Summary

finally, in a word, in brief, in conclusion, in the end, in the final analysis, on the whole, thus, to conclude, to summarize, in sum, in summary

 

For more information on transitions visit: http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/transitions.html

Grammar and Spelling

You must make certain that your paper is free from grammar and spelling mistakes. Mechanical errors are usually the main reason for lack of clarity in essays, so be sure to thoroughly proof read your paper before handing it in. For help with common errors in grammar and usage consult the following websites:

http://www.sfu.ca/~gmccarro/Grammar/Grammar.html http://ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/index2.htm http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/

 

Sample Position Papers

http://college.hmco.com/instructors/catalog/walkthroughs/pdf/0618133968_ch18.pdf

How to Cite your Work

http://www.easybib.com/

Directions:
Reread lessons one and two in your "Sound and Light" texts.  Then read the  
background information below.
 

The Speed of a Wave

A wave is a disturbance that moves along a medium from one end to the other. If one watches an ocean wave moving along the medium (the ocean water), one can observe that the crest of the wave is moving from one location to another over a given interval of time. The crest is observed to cover distance. The speed of an object refers to how fast an object is moving and is usually expressed as the distance traveled per time of travel. In the case of a wave, the speed is the distance traveled by a given point on the wave (such as a crest) in a given interval of time. In equation form,

 

The Anatomy of a Wave

A transverse wave is a wave in which the particles of the medium are displaced in a direction perpendicular to the direction of energy transport. A transverse wave can be created in a rope if the rope is stretched out horizontally and the end is vibrated back-and-forth in a vertical direction. If a snapshot of such a transverse wave could be taken so as to freeze the shape of the rope in time, then it would look like the following diagram.

 

Energy Transport and the Amplitude of a Wave

As mentioned earlier, a wave is an energy transport phenomenon that transports energy along a medium without transporting matter. A pulse or a wave is introduced into a slinky when a person holds the first coil and gives it a back-and-forth motion. This creates a disturbance within the medium; this disturbance subsequently travels from coil to coil, transporting energy as it moves. The energy is imparted to the medium by the person as he/she does work upon the first coil to give it kinetic energy. This energy is transferred from coil to coil until it arrives at the end of the slinky. If you were holding the opposite end of the slinky, then you would feel the energy as it reaches your end. In fact, a high energy pulse would likely do some rather noticeable work upon your hand upon reaching the end of the medium; the last coil of the medium would displace you hand in the same direction of motion of the coil. For the same reasons, a high energy ocean wave can do considerable damage to the rocks and piers along the shoreline when it crashes upon it

Prompt:

Joshua L. and Joseph W. decide to change the How Do Waves Travel investigation from a silver cooking pan to a public pool?  They said they wanted to create a disturbance using a slender person and a really robust person.  Both individuals agreed to place a basketball close to the edge of the water.  Joshua suggested that each person should cannonball three times off the high dive into the water, so he and Joseph could sketch the pattern of the waves created by both divers.  Joseph said the energy produced by both people would remain constant, while Joshua theorized that the robust diver’s body mass and weight would create more energy in the water.  Who is correct, Joshua or Joseph?  Write a short essay to explain whose position you support.  Support either Joshua’s point of view or Joseph’s point of view with information from the textbook, the web page and other sources.  Make sure to include the key terms from lesson one and two in your position paper.

Guidelines:

  • Think about the issue and decide your point of view
  • Aim for four paragraphs, roughly 300-500 words
    • Introduction
    • Counter Argument
    • Your Argument
    • Conclusion
  •  Follow the outline at the top of the page, use foursquare or another graphic organizer to help organize your paper
  • Revise your work, make sure your final product is flawless
  • A typed paper is always better, but if you write it, make sure it is neat

Position Project Paper Rubric

Position Paper RUBRIC

20-18

17-15

14-12

11-9

8-6

5-0

Total

Thesis Statement

Developed a strong thesis and included it in the appropriate place in the paper. The thesis was the focal point of the paper and was both strongly and thoroughly supported throughout the paper.

Developed a strong thesis and included it in the appropriate place in the paper. The thesis was the focal point of the paper and supported throughout the paper.

Developed a strong thesis and included it in the appropriate place in the paper. Most of the information supported the thesis statement.

Developed a thesis statement and included it in the paper. Some of the information supported the thesis statement.

Thesis Statement needs to be developed further or is not included in the paper. The thesis is not fully supported in the paper.

A clear position is not present throughout the paper.

Strong Reasons

Position is supported with well developed and thought out reasons (minimum of three). Reasons show strong analysis and conclusions based on the information.

Position is supported with well developed and thought out reasons (minimum of three). Reasons are well developed, but analysis and conclusions need to be strengthened.

Position is supported with a minimum of three distinct reasons. Reasons are developed, but more analysis and conclusions are needed.

Position is supported with a minimum of three distinct reasons. Reasons are developed, but are more general and need to be developed further.

Reasons are weak and/or repetitive. They need to be developed and explained further.

Reasons are not developed or are repetitive. Ideas can be difficult to understand.

Depth and Variety of Evidence

Position is supported in depth with a variety of sources. Substantial valid and accurate information in the form of expert opinion, statistics, research studies, etc. has been used throughout the paper. Information is relevant and supports the writer’s ideas.

Position is supported with a variety of sources. Adequate valid and accurate information has been used throughout the paper. Information is relevant and supports the writer’s ideas.

Position is supported with a variety of sources. Valid and accurate information has been used throughout the paper. Most of the information is relevant and supports the writer’s ideas. A mix of general and specific information is used.

Position needs to be supported with more valid and accurate information. Some of the information may not be relevant and/or does not support the thesis.

Paper lacks valid and accurate information. Some of the information is not relevant and does not support the position.

Little to no support from researched information is present in the paper.

Organization and Mechanics

Ideas are well organized and free of mechanical errors.

Most ideas are well organized and free of mechanical errors.

Organization of the paper needs to be strengthened. Mechanical errors are present throughout the paper.

Paper has some organization but some diversions or abrupt shifts in purpose are present. Many mechanical errors are present as well. Sentence structure needs to be strengthened.

Paper has little organization and many diversions, often shifting in purpose. Many mechanical errors are present and transitions are not utilized.

Paper lacks organization and there are numerous mechanical errors which make comprehension difficult.

Transitions

Transitional words and phrases are used to connect ideas and maintain coherence between paragraphs.

Some transitional words and phrases are used to connect ideas and maintain coherence between paragraphs.

Too few transitions used, or used correctly.

Too few transitions used.

Attempts made to use appropriate transitions.

Lack of transitions.

Position Paper Score:

/100

Position Project Paper  

 

Below is a link to a writing rubric to use for "Common Core" writing standard 1 Argument for sixth grade
 
Due Monday, December 10, 2012 for Mr. Davis' Class and Friday, December 14
for Mrs. Cooper and Mrs. Allen's Classes.
11/13/12
Science Questions for All Three Classes
1. Predict the outcome if more energy is introduced in the pan of water?

2. Can you formulate a theory for the plastic’s movements?

3. What other idea or activity could you come up with to show what we observed?

4. How is this activity related to a water skier?

5. If a student from another school came to this classroom how would you interpret your drawing to him/her?
 
11/13/12
Mr. Davis Class only
 
Read over the first lab zone activity.  Pay close attention to #3 and #4 of the investigation.  Make these high level questions such:
  • How is the duck's motion on page 7 related to a water skier's motion?
  • How would you adapt this lab zone activity using another medium to achieve the same results?
  • What conclusion can be drawn from this activity?Create three more high level questions.  Come prepared to discuss them in class. 
  • Make sure to think deeply and critically. 

 

 
 
 
Monday, Novemeber 5
 
Mr. Davis class will take their health assessment on Wednesday, November 7.  Mrs. Cooper and Mrs. Allen's classes will take their assessments on Friday, November 9.  The assessment will cover chapter 8, lessons 1-5.
 
Study Guide
 
  • Please study all highlighted words.
  • Where do medicines come from? 
  • What are the side effects of medicines? 
  • Compare and contrast OTC and prescription drugs.
  • What are the dangers of drug abuse?
  • Why do people abuse drugs?
  • How does drug abuse effect others?
  • What are Stimulants and how do they effect the body?
  • Provide three products that are stimulants.
  • What are depressants and how do they effect the body?
  • Describe three types of depressants.
  • What are narcotics and how do they effect the body? 
  • What are illegal narcotics, what are the severe side effects of narcotics and what do dealers do with illegal narcotics?       
  • What are steroids and how do they effect the body? 
  • Why is marijuana dangerous? 
  • Describe illegal drugs such as inhalants, hallucinogens, cocaine and crack and explain why they are dangerous. 
  • Why should people refuse drugs?
  • Where can a person get help in refusing drugs?
  • List three strategies a person might use to avoid drug use.
  • Study the table on page 271.  
 
 
Today, November 5, I sent students in Mrs. Allen and Mrs. Cooper's class home with a health business letter to complete for me.  They received a dual-sided handout with instructions on one side and its companion scoring rubric on the other side.  The letter is due November 13.  The rubric and business letter model are below.
 
 

This business letter format illustrates the specific parts of a business letter.

Writing an Effective Business Letter
 
Business Letter Template Fields:

Date: Use month, day, year format, e.g., March 3, 2012 or 3 March 2012

Sender's Address: It is a good idea to include sender's email and url, if available. Don't include this information if it's already incorporated into the letterhead design. This will allow customers to find your small business more quickly.

Inside Address: Use full name. Mr./Ms. is optional

Salutation: Be sure to use a colon at the end of the name, not a comma as in personal letters

Body Text: State why you are writing. Establish any connection/mutual relationship up front. Outline the solution, providing proof in the way of examples and expert opinions. Group related information into paragraphs

Closing "Call to Action": State what the reader needs to do and what you will do to follow up

Signature Block: Sign your letter in blue or black ink

Enclosures: Use if you have an enclosure

Carbon Copy: Use if you are sending a copy to additional person(s)

 
 
 
 
Mr. Davis' class
 
  • Chapter 8, lesson one: Answer all of the Focus Skill activities
  • Chapter 8, lesson two: Define all of the highlighted words (text feature), write one sentence for each vocabulary word and write a one to two-page realistic fiction short story that uses all of the vocabulary words.  This assignment is due October 5. 

Weighted Rubric for Short Story 100 pts.

(15 * 4 = 60) + (10 * 4 = 40)

Category

15

13

12

11

Characterization

The main characters are named and clearly described using variety of direct and indirect techniques. Most readers could describe the characters accurately.

The main characters are named and described using some direct and indirect techniques. Most readers would have some idea of what the characters are like.

The main characters are named using few direct and indirect characterization techniques. The reader knows very little about the characters.

It is hard to tell who the main characters are and there is little or no use of direct or indirect characterization techniques.

Setting

Many vivid, descriptive words are used to tell when and where the story took place.

Some vivid, descriptive words are used to tell the audience when and where the story took place.

The reader can figure out when and where the story took place, but the author didn't supply much detail.

The reader has trouble figuring out when and where the story took place.

Organization of Plot

The story is very well organized. One idea or scene follows another in a logical sequence with clear transitions.

The story is pretty well organized. One idea or scene may seem out of place. Clear transitions are used.

The story is a little hard to follow. The transitions are sometimes not clear.

Ideas and scenes seem to be randomly arranged.

Creativity

The story contains many creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader's enjoyment. The author has really used his/her imagination.

The story contains a few creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader's enjoyment. The author has used his/her imagination.

The story contains a few creative details and/or descriptions, but they distract from the story. The author has tried to use his/her imagination.

There is little evidence of creativity in the story. The author does not seem to have used much imagination.

Sentence Structure (Fluency)

All sentences are well-constructed with varied and interesting structure patterns.

Most sentences are well-constructed with varied and interesting structure patterns.

Most sentences are well-constructed but have similar and uninteresting structure patterns.

Sentences lack structure and appear incomplete or rambling.

10

8

4

2

Grammar and Spelling (Conventions)

Writer makes no errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader form the content.

Writer makes 1-2 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader form the content.

Writer makes 3-4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader form the content.

Writer makes more than 4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader form the content.

 
 Mrs. Cooper and Mrs. Allen's Classes: Read Chapter 8, lesson one "Medicines Can Help People Stay Healthy" and create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast over-the-counter drugs and prescription drugs.  Study the highlighted vocabulary words.  Due October 4. 
E-Mail Assignment for Mrs. Allen and Mrs. Cooper's classes
 

Your friend has not looked well for the past three days. He/she told you that they have been allowed to take prescription medication without the supervision on an adult in the household. They also mention that the pain does not go away, but there’s more. Your friend said that he/she takes more than one tablet with any type of beverage.

You have the same doctor as your friend. Decide whether to write an e-mail or business letter to the doctor. In the first paragraph explain to the doctor who you are and why you are contacting him/her. Give compelling details to catch his/her attention. In the second paragraph, explain to the doctor what you know about aspirin and how your friend should have responded to the pain. Use the aspirin label worksheet as a reference. In the third paragraph thank the doctor for his/her help and mention that you will see them soon. Each paragraph should have four to six sentences. This includes a topic sentence, supporting statements and a closing statement that transitions to the next paragraph.

I will provide the email format. This assignment covers chapter 8, lesson 1 and is due Friday, October 5.

Email Rubric

Email Writing Rubric

0

1

2

3

Total

Email Header

Email has no heading

Email has incomplete heading; missing the address or date.

Email has complete heading, but missing appropriate punctuation.

Email has a complete address and date with proper punctuation

Salutation

Email has no salutation

Attempts salutation, missing title, proper punctuation

Has salutation, but missing proper punctuation

Complete salutation.

Body

Email has no organized paragraphs.

Email has a body of one or more organized paragraphs and these paragraphs are not indented.

Email has a body of one organized paragraph and this paragraph is indented.

Email has a body of two or more organized paragraphs and each paragraph is indented.

Closing

Email has no closing.

Email has incorrect closing.

Email has appropriate closing, but missing proper punctuation.

Email has complete appropriate closing.

Signature

Email has no typed signature.

Email has incorrect project signature.

Email has appropriate typed project signature, but missing proper punctuation.

Email has appropriate typed project signature.

Mechanics

Email has four or more spelling errors and/or grammatical errors.

Email has three misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

Email has no more than two misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

Email has no misspellings or grammatical errors

Typing Skills

Email has many typing errors.

Email has three or more typing errors.

Email has no more than two typing errors.

Email has no typing errors.

Total

A = 20-21

B = 18-19

C = 16-17

D = 14-15

F = 0-13

 
Foldable Project
 
Mrs. Cooper and Mrs. Allen's classes will create a quad-fold foldable brochure.  The outside front of the brochure is the cover of the brochure.  The front cover must display an original title describing chapter 8, lesson 1, a picture that describes the lesson, the student's name and date of completion. The inside pages must contain "Where Medicines Come From," "Side Effects of Medicines," "Two Types of Medicines," and "Using Medicines Safely." 
 
Each sub topic page must contain a summary, a picture and a caption.  All brochures should exude color and the text must be large enough to see from six feet away.  The back of the brochure should have a brief bio about the author of the brochure with a picture of the author.  Please exercise originality!  Look below and you will see the project rubric. 

This project is due Thursday, October 18, 2012.

Foldable Rubric

 

 

Student Name: ________________________

Teacher Name: ________________________

CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Required

Elements

The foldable includes all required elements as well as additional information.

All required elements are included on the foldable.

All but 1 of the required elements is included on the foldable.

Several required elements were missing.

Labels

All items of importance on the foldable are clearly labeled.

Almost all items of importance on the foldable are clearly labeled.

Many items of importance on the foldable are clearly labeled.

Labels are too small, messy OR no important items were labeled.

Graphics - Relevance

All graphics are related to the topic and make it easier to understand.

All graphics are related to the topic and most make it easier to understand.

All graphics relate to the topic.

Graphics do not relate to the topic.

Attractiveness

The foldable is exceptionally attractive in terms of design, layout, and neatness.

The foldable is attractive in terms of design, layout and neatness.

The foldable is acceptably attractive though it may be a bit messy.

The foldable is distractingly messy or very poorly designed. It is not attractive.

Grammar

There are no grammatical and/or mechanical mistakes on the foldable.

There are 1-2 grammatical and/or mechanical mistakes on the foldable.

There are 3-4 grammatical and/or mechanical mistakes on the foldable.

There are more than 4 grammatical and/or mechanical mistakes on the foldable.

Sources

All borrowed graphics and/or content information have source citation.

Some borrowed graphics and/or content information have source citation.

One or two borrowed graphics and/or content information have source citation.

Borrowed graphics and/or content information do not have source citation.

Totals:

 
 
 
 
 
 
Study Guide:
  •  "Graphs in Science."  What is a graph? (p. 69); Why are Line Graphs Useful? (p.69); Plotting a Line Graph (p.70); Using Graphs to Identify Trends (p. 74).
  • Mean, Median and Mode (p. 66)
  • Significant Figures (p. 63)
  • Accuracy and Precision (p. 62)
  • Ken (Kilometer = 1,000)
  • Has (Hectometer = 100)
  • Donuts (Dekameter = 10)
  • But (Basic Unit = Meter = 1)
  • Dan (Decimeter =0.1)
  • Can (Centimeter = 0.01)
  • Make More (millimeter = 0.001)
  • The metric system is based on what number?
  • What are the SI units for length, mass, temperature, volume and time?
  • What are the two measurements that make up density?
  • What is the formula to find the density of an object?
  • What is the formula to find the volume of a solid?
  • How do you find the volume od an irregular object?
  • What is the difference between mass and weight?
  • What is the density of a brick with a volume of 864 cm3 and a mass of 12 g?
  • Morgan bought her dad a pair of Cole Haan shoes.  What is the volume of the shoe box if the width is 12 cm, the height is 8 cm and the length is 24 cm?
  • How many centimeters are in a meter?
  • How many meters are in a kilometer?
  • How many grams are in a kilogram?
 
 
 Thursday, October 11, 2012: Mr. Davis' Class: Please describe accuracy and precision and provide real-world examples of each.  Also, explain significant figures.  Due Friday, October 12, 2012.
 
Thursday, October 12, 2012: Mrs. Cooper's class: Get Ready!  Get Ready! Study for the cooperative measurement II quiz!
 
Friday, October 12, 2012: Mrs. Cooper's class and Mrs. Allen's class: Please describe accuracy and precision and provide real-world examples of each. Also, explain significant figures. Due Monday, October 15, 2012.
 
 
 
Study Chapter 2, lesson one for a quiz on 10/10/12.
 
Read Chapter 2, lesson One (Measurement--A Common Language) and outline the chapter.  Due Wednesday, October 3.
 
 
Read Chapter 1, section 2, and reinforce your knowledge of "Scientific Inquiry" in the "Nature of Science Technology" textbook (pages 13-22). Answer the Reviewing Key Concept questions underneath section 2 assessment.  Due Tuesday.
 
 

Monday, September 10: Study Chapter 1, lesson 2

"Scientific Inquiry" and please prepare yourself for

this very important quiz!!!! Proper preparation 

 prevents poor performance!!!!

 

Wednesday, September 11: Lab Zone: Skills Activity: Controlling
Variables (p. 16).
 
I have extended the due date of my Science chapter project to Monday, September 24.   
 

Chapter Project

 

Objective: Students will design and conduct a scientific experiment to test whether a common belief is true or false. After completing this Chapter Project, students will be able to:

• develop a hypothesis about whether a common belief is true or false.

• design a controlled experiment that will test the hypothesis.

• interpret the data from the experiment and draw a conclusion about the hypothesis.

• communicate results to the class.

The All in One Resource has worksheets that can guide students through the chapter project and help keep them on track.  I will send the worksheets home with the students to guide their process.  Below you will find a bulleted list of project activities and the due dates for each activity.   

 

          ·        Compile a list of common beliefs due Thursday, September 20

·         Plan an investigation of a common belief for worksheet two due Friday, September 21

·         Carry out your experiment due , Monday, September 24

·          Make a data table and a graph from the data due Monday, September 24

·         Draw a conclusion about your hypothesis due Monday, September 24

·         Create a poster that summarizes your experiment due Monday, September 24

·         Present your poster to the class due Monday, September 24

    

 
 
 
 
 
 

Weekly Homework: Current Events Articles

Current events must be incorporated into classroom instruction throughout the school year. Weekly assignments should pertain to the content being taught and should be collected and graded. These assignments assist in the instruction of content, development of reading proficiency, and expose the students to people, places, and ideas outside of their school and community environments.

Assignments should include:

Article Title:

Article Source:

Article Date:

Summarize:

TOPIC: What is the article about?

WHAT: What is the issue or event discussed in the article?

WHERE: Where is the event taking place?

WHEN: When did the event take place? Is it still going on?

WHY: Why is the event taking place? Why is it important?

WHO: Who are the people involved?

Interpret: To me, this article means…My reaction to this issue/event is…

Articles should be from a variety of sources, such as newspapers, newsmagazines, newscasts, the Internet, etc.

Five Themes of Geography Project

Happy Friday parents and students! This is another project my group of innovative geographers must complete. Initially I told them to complete this project by Tuesday. However, I will change the due date to September 7. I provided a rubric and notes below to help complete the project (Refer back to the Social Studies page).

· Describe Rosaryville Elementary School by using the 5 Themes of Geography.

· Make sure you use every theme.

· Make your poster creative and colorful.

If you can’t remembering what they are just ask MR. HELP!!!

M –Movement

R. –Regions

HE – Human Environment interaction

L –Location

P - Place

 
 
 

CATEGORY

5

4

3

2

Title

Title can be read from 6 ft. away and is a creative label for one of the 5 themes of geography.

Title can be read from 6 ft. away and is a label for one of the 5 themes of geography.

The title is too small and/or does not describe one of the 5 themes of geography

There is no title.

Graphics - Relevance

The pictures are an excellent representation of the theme. It makes the theme easier to understand.

The pictures are related to the theme and after reading the caption, it makes the theme easier to understand.

The pictures are not clearly related to the theme - it's a bit of a stretch. Even after reading your caption, the theme is hard to understand.

There are few pictures and they are not related to the themes at all.

Content - Accuracy

The caption clearly identifies the picture (s), clearly describes why those picture(s) or graphic representations are an example of the theme, and it defines the theme thoroughly with three facts about Rosaryville related to that theme.

The caption clearly identifies the picture(s) and clearly describes why those picture(s) are an example of the theme.  It provides a definition and at least two facts about Rosaryville related to that theme.

The caption identifies the picture(s) but doesn't describe why those picture(s) are an example of the theme OR the caption doesn't identify the picture(s), but it describes the theme.

There is no caption -OR the caption does not identify the picture(s) and it does not describe the theme.

Mechanics

Capitalization, punctuation and spelling are correct throughout the poster.

There are 1 or 2 errors in capitalization, punctuation or spelling.

There are 3-5 errors in capitalization, punctuation or spelling.

There are more than 5 errors in capitalization, punctuation and spelling.

Attractiveness

The poster is exceptionally attractive in terms of design, layout, neatness in use of color.

The poster is attractive in terms of design, layout and neatness.

The poster is acceptably attractive though it may be a bit messy.

The poster is distractingly messy or very poorly designed. It is not attractive.

 

Globes: Know Your Hemispheres worksheets due Wednesday, Sept. 5

Scale and Distance: How too use a map scale due Thursday, Sept. 6

 

 

 

Foldable Chapter 8, Lesson One booklet (Mr. Davis' Homeroom) Due Tuesday, September 18

Aspirin Label Worksheet (Mrs. Cooper's Homeroom and Mrs. Allen's Homeroom) Due Tuesday, September 18