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Containers (ActivInspire)

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Mr. West
by MARK WEST 02/08/10

Mac Tips

Special Keys

The Mac Command Key

You probably call this the "Apple Key", but it's officially called the Command Key and it is located near your spacebar. It is used on a Mac much like the control key is used on Microsoft Windows®; example: control-c on Windows copies and on a Mac we use command-c; control-v pastes on Windows and command-v pastes on Mac OS.


The Option Key

The Option Key is located near the Command Key and is sometimes called the ALT key. This key can frustrate a Windows user, as it doesn't work as a Windows ALT key does (you'll often use the Command Key on Mac where ALT is used in Windows), such as when tabbing through open applications: on Windows it's ALT-Tab, on a Mac it's Command-Tab.


The Control Key

The Control Key is located near the Command Key and has special funtions on a Mac (see "Right Clicking" below).


Exiting A Bad Program

On Windows, Alt+F4 will quickly terminate a program.

On Mac OS, Command+Q will quickly terminate a program.


The "3-Finger Salute"

On Windows, when a program stops behaving properly, you can press Control+Alt+Delete to invoke the Task Manager to make an application stop.

On Mac OS, you can accomplish the same thing by pressing Command+Option+Escape; this invokes the Force Quit menu and you can make applications stop.


"Right Clicking"

Sometimes you need to right click. On most computers it's easy, as they come with a two-button mouse. On Mac OS, you typically find a single-button mouse.

You can plug a two-button mouse in to a Mac and it will work. The reason is because two-button mice work on Unix and Mac OS is a Unix variant that uses parts from FreeBSD's and NetBSD's implementation of Unix.

You can also "right click" on a Mac with a single button mouse. To do so, you can do either of the following:

  1. Press and hold the Control Key while clicking.
  2. (This one only works if you have a Mac with a touchpad - usually a laptop) place two fingers on the touchpad while clicking.

Containers

For this example, I am using the English/Language Arts standards

0501.1.4 Capitalize sentence beginnings, proper nouns and adjectives, titles, abbreviations, quotations, parts of friendly letters and business letters.

0601.1.3 Use capitalization correctly (e.g., proper adjectives, within quotations).

0701.1.3 Use capitalization correctly (e.g., titles, friendly and business letters, quotations, proper adjectives).

0801.1.3 Use capitalization correctly (e.g., titles, business letters, quotations, proper nouns and adjectives).

Not Captialized
penguins
lemurs
you
church
soccer
flag
Captialized
Nashville
Cookeville
I
Sunday
English
America

We'll use this picture of a man pondering which I drew for this lesson:

container

For the container object, I whipped up something in the GIMP:

container
note that this uses Hawksmont's star brushes

For the background, I whipped up something in the GIMP:

container
  1. Set the background. Go to the Edit menu and choose Page Background. From the popup window, choose Image and then Browse to the background image.
  2. Using the Insert Media from File tool, I import the container image. To resize it, click the image, use the Properties Browser, choose Position. Set the Width to 300 and the Height to 200. Then, using the Marquee Handles Toolbar, I make a duplicate.
  3. Relocate one image (click on the image with the select tool. Then, using the Properties Browser, choosing Position) and set Left to 40 and Top to 75
  4. Relocate the other image (click on the image with the select tool. Then, using the Properties Browser, choosing Position) and set Left to 440 and Top to 75
  5. Using the Insert Media from File tool, I import the pondering girl image. To resize it, click the image, use the Properties Browser, choose Position. Set the Width to 227 and the Height to 300. I'll move her image to the bottom left corner and using the Marquee Handle Toolbar, lock her in place.
  6. Using the text tool, I'll type in (without quotes) "Captialize" in Arial, 36 point, Bold, White.
  7. Relocate this text (click on the text with the select tool. Then, using the Properties Browser, choosing Position) and set Left to 44 and Top to 28
  8. Using the Marquee Handle Toolbar, lock the text in place.
  9. Using the text tool, I'll type in (without quotes) "Don't Captialize" in Arial, 36 point, Bold, White.
  10. Relocate this text (click on the text with the select tool. Then, using the Properties Browser, choosing Position) and set Left to 444 and Top to 28
  11. Using the Marquee Handle Toolbar, lock the text in place.
  12. I will now add my vocabulary in, one word at a time and all lower case:
    america
    church
    cookeville
    english
    flag
    i
    lemurs
    nashville
    soccer
    sunday
    you
    remember that you can highlight a word and then drag it directly in to ActivInspire. (So you don't need to type them in; just drop them somewhere on the flipchart).
  13. Click on the picture below the word containers. Using the Properties Browser, choose Containers.
    do this
    Change Can Contain to Keywords. Add a Keyword Called Capitalize.
  14. Repeat the above process for the other picture, except make the Keyword NoCap.
  15. Click on the word nashville. Using the Properties Browser, choose Identification.
    do this
    add a keyword called Capitalize. Now in the Properties Browser, choose Containers.
    do this
    Change Return If Not Contained to True.
  16. repeat that process for the following words: Cookeville, I, Sunday, English and America
  17. repeat the above process for the otherwords, except make the Keyword NoCap

  18. Sample Flipchart

    A link to the flipchart or if that's messed up, here's A link to the zip archive of the flipchart.


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