CTE

 CTE classes are available for private school students. They can contact the school counselor for enrollment information.

 

Business Management/Entrepreneurship Program of Study

Computer Applications

Computer Applications is a foundational course intended to teach students the computing fundamentals and concepts involved in the proficient use of common application software. Upon completion of this course, students will gain basic proficiency in word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentations. In addition, students will have engaged in key critical thinking skills and will have practiced ethical and appropriate behavior required for the responsible use of technology. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee Common Core State Standards for Literacy in Technical Subjects and Tennessee Common Core State Standards in Mathematics.*

Accounting I

Accounting I introduces concepts and principles based on a double-entry system of maintaining the electronic and manual financial records for a sole proprietorship, a partnership, and a corporation. It includes analyzing business transactions, journalizing, posting and preparing worksheets and financial statements. (This course provides access to a computerized workstation for each student to complete financial applications using accounting and spreadsheet software.)

Exploration of Organizational Leadership and Marketing

This course is designed to introduce and provide an overview of marketing and organizational leadership, as well as employment opportunities available in these fields. Students will explore important marketing concepts, personality traits, and communication skills. Students will also develop skills in teamwork, conflict resolution, and group problem-solving techniques used in business.

Entrepreneurship

The course includes enhanced marketing information as it relates to entrepreneurial activities. Subject matter includes introductory entrepreneurial concepts, business plan development, management responsibilities, and legal and ethical issues of business ownership.

Entrepreneurship is also available to twelfth-grade students who have completed at least one year of related study in another Career and Technical Education area, Construction Core or Human Services and have an interest in owning their own business. Several items in this class are the same as we covered in Virtual Enterprise.

Finance Program of Study

Includes the courses as listed above, Computer Applications and Accounting I and.

Financial Planning

Financial Planning is a course designed to develop skills in the use of financial principles in making business decisions. Students will research job qualifications and employment opportunities in finance. The course includes a study of the allocation of financial resources, the effects of finance and credit institutions on the business community, and the impact of financial decisions on the consumer market. Ethical issues will be explored in this course. (Online computer access will be required for accessing the Internet financial markets and related software.)

Construction Core

Construction Core is a course that will introduce students to basic skills and knowledge applicable to all construction trades. Topics covered include safety, construction drawings, site layout, hand and power tools, linear and angular measurements, and application of algebraic and geometric principles to construction problems.

Carpentry I

Carpentry I is a course that will introduce students to basic skills and knowledge related to residential and commercial carpentry. Topics covered include wood, metal, and concrete building materials; fasteners; hand and power tools; fabrication based on construction plans; and framing of platform and post-and-beam structures, in both wood and metal. This course gives students an introduction to the skill and knowledge base typically required for apprentice carpenters.

Carpentry II

Carpentry II is a course I which students will extend their skills and knowledge related to residential and commercial carpentry. Topics covered include stairs, installation and trim of windows and doors, installation and repair of gypsum wallboard, advanced site layout, exterior finish work, and thermal and moisture protection. This course gives students a substantial skill and knowledge foundation typically required for apprentice carpenters.

Introduction to Human Studies

Introduction to Human Studies is a foundational course for students interested in becoming a public advocate, social worker, dietician, nutritionist, counselor, or community volunteer. This course covers the history of counseling, career investigation, stress management, mental illness, communication, and the counseling process. Artifacts will be created for inclusion in a portfolio, which will continue to built throughout the program of study. Standards in the course are aligned with Tennessee Common Core State Standards for English Language & Literacy in Technical Subjects, as well as the Tennessee Psychology and Sociology standards, and the National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education, Second Edition.

Family Studies

Family Studies is an applied knowledge course that examines the diversity and evolving structure of the modern family. Course standards focus on the demographic, historical, and social changes of interpersonal relationships, as well as parenting, and the effect of stressors on the family. Artifacts will be created for inclusion in a portfolio, which will continue to build throughout the program of study. Standards in the course are aligned with Tennessee Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects, as well as Tennessee Psychology, Scientific Research, Sociology, and US History standards and the National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education, Second Edition.

Lifespan Development

Lifespan Development builds basic knowledge in human growth and development. The course standards include developmental theory, principles of growth, behavior of children from conception through adolescence, adult development and aging, and death and dying. Artifacts will be created for inclusion in a portfolio, which will continue to build throughout the program of study. Standards in the course are aligned with Tennessee Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects, as well as Tennessee Biology I, Psychology, and Sociology standards, and National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education, Second Edition.

Nutrition Across the Lifespan

Nutrition Across the Lifespan is for students interested in learning more about becoming a dietitian, nutritionist, counselor, or pursing a variety of scientific, health, or culinary arts professions. This course covers human anatomy and physiological systems, nutrition requirements, as well as social, cultural, and other impacts on food preparation and integrity. Artifacts will be created for inclusion in a portfolio, which will continue to build throughout the program of study. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects, as well as Tennessee Biology I, Chemistry I, Human Anatomy & Physiology (A&P), Scientific Research, and World Geography and the National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education, Second Edition.

Early Childhood Education Careers I

Early Childhood Education Careers I (ECEC I) is a foundational course in the Human Services career cluster. Careers in early childhood education include but are not limited to childcare providers, nannies, and preschool teachers. This course studies the foundation of childhood development services, careers, provider responsibilities and aptitudes, and fundamentals of child development. Students will create a course portfolio. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects and Tennessee state standards for Biology I, Psychology, and Sociology, as well as the National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education, Second Edition.

Early Childhood Education Careers II

Early Childhood Education Careers III (ECEC III) is an applied knowledge course for students interested in learning more about becoming an early childhood teacher, nanny, or childcare provider. This course covers the components of the learning environment, planning age appropriate activities, using activities for learning, and developing communication skills. Students in this course will participate in a work- based learning component of instruction and add work products to a course portfolio. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects and Tennessee Psychology, Scientific Research, and Sociology standards and the National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education, Second Edition.

English

Anchor Standards for Reading

English I -Students will be challenged with works whose range extends across genres, cultures, and centuries. Such works as Great Expectations, Animal Farm, The Odyssey and Romeo & Juliet offer profound insights into the human condition and serve as models for students’ own thinking and writing. Students gain a foundation of literary and cultural knowledge and the capacity to surmount the challenges posed by complex texts. Writing is a key means of asserting and defending claims, showing what they know about a subject, and conveying what they have experienced, thought, and felt. Students must have firm control over the conventions of standard English.

English II- This course will build on skills obtained in English I with the goal of achieving college and career readiness for every student. The English II curriculum includes reading a mixture of fiction and nonfiction texts and dissecting them to discover how writing works to create meaning as well as the tools authors use to deliver a message. Texts range from Shakespearean plays and To Kill a Mockingbird to current articles and commercials. By analyzing both what the author says and what the author does, students learn to think more critically about information they encounter in the world around them. In addition to reading a variety of texts, students will learn to recognize and manipulate grammatical, structural, and rhetorical features in their own writing and compose an argument that presents a thesis and defends it with evidence.

English III- is a comprehensive study of American Literature. Students will focus on the elements of literature to analyze complex pieces of text. Students will study a variety of short stories, poems, and novels over the duration of course. In addition to studying literature students will also work to improve their writing skills. Students will write in many different modes including persuasive essay, narrative writing, and research-based analysis. Students will also study the evolution of the writing process and examine techniques to improve their writing skills. Finally, students will learn to participate in meaningful class discussions and sharpen their communication skills while learning to create and support meaningful claims.

English IV- is a course that focuses on British Literature. Students will study novels, essays, plays, poems, and short stories. Students will learn to use evidence to make claims about literature and analyze the merit of each piece. Students will also to continue to study writing and further expand their knowledge of research and how to create and maintain a clear argument in their writing assignments. Students will also develop skills in presentation by participation in class discussions and debates.

Spanish I

The Spanish I level begins with basic Spanish language consisting of: greetings/farewells depending on the time of day, learning the alphabet, learning numbers 1-100, days of the weeks, telling time, telling and describing the seasons.

As time progresses, we move into more complex concepts: nouns (gender& number agreement), adjectives and verbs, as well as pronouns and possessive adjectives. Students also learn to conjugate the verb Ser. All along students are learning vocabulary and culture relating to different topics.

Towards the end of Spanish I students learn vocabulary relating to family. Also, students will do “Proyecto de familia,” a family project worth two exam grades. Students learn to conjugate their second verb, Tener. Students will learn vocabulary concerning the school day, school supplies, and after school activities; and about the differences between schools here in the U.S. and schools in latin America and Spain.

Lastly students will learn to conjugate all three types of verbs: -ar, -er & -ir verbs. Also will end the semester with learning vocabulary relating to foods and meals; breakfast, lunch & dinner. They will learn about the eating habits of people here in the U.S. and people in Spain and in latin America.

Spanish II

For the Spanish II level we will continue to use the Spanish I book. Our goal is to finish the entire Spanish I book. Students will be expected to remember a significant amount of vocabulary and to have maintained verb conjugation knowledge from the previous year.

We begin with a week-long review of the previous year’s most important concepts. Then we move on the conjugating a different type of verb: Stem-changing verbs as well as learn vocabulary relating to sports. Also students will learn colors and will do “Proyecto de colores” worth two exam grades.

We continue the semester by learning even more adjectives. These adjectives can be used to describe health, feeling/emotions and personality/behavior. Later we learn culture and vocabulary relating to vacations.

Next students are taught a past tense and how to conjugate existing verbs in the preterite tense. Students double their vocabulary by being able to communicate in the present and in the preterite (past) tense. Their understanding of the language grows extensively.

Towards the end, students learn vocabulary relating to shopping for food and clothing and traveling out of the country. Lastly, students will learn about the human body, as well as, learn to conjugate reflexive verbs and in the present progressive tense.

MATHEMATICS

INTEGRATED MATHEMATICS 1 (FRESHMAN COURSE)

This course is the first of three courses in a series that uses a more integrated approach to cover the same algebra and geometry concepts and skills that are included in the traditional three course series. The problem situations, models, and technology used will foster connections among the various strands of mathematics and develop concepts from multiple perspectives.

INTEGRATED MATHEMATICS 2 (SOPHOMORE COURSE)

This course is the second of three courses in a series that uses a more integrated approach to cover the same algebra and geometry concepts and skills that are included in the traditional three course series. The problem situations, models, and technology used will foster connections among the various strands of mathematics and develop concepts from multiple perspectives.

INTEGRATED MATHEMATICS 3 (JUNIOR COURSE)

This course is the third of three courses in a series that uses a more integrated approach to cover the same algebra and geometry concepts and skills that are included in the traditional three course series. The problem situations, models, and technology used will foster connections among the various strands of mathematics and develop concepts from multiple perspectives.

BRIDGE MATHEMATICS (SENIOR LEVEL)

In alignment with the Developmental Studies Program for Mathematics outcomes, the curriculum standards have been organized into groups of mathematical skills. Certain mathematical skills are required in order to prepare a DSPM student for college level mathematics courses. However, these particular skills should be developed in an environment that promotes learning beyond skill and drill techniques. These new skills should be introduced in conjunction with appropriate mathematical concepts and should relate to previous learning. Applications of these skills should play a principal role in the learning and assessment process. Technology should be used to strategically enhance the student’s understanding of core concepts via the use of multiple problem solving strategies,

SENIOR FINITE MATH (SENIOR LEVEL)

This course is designed to prepare students for both college and the workplace. Students choosing this course would be less likely to enroll in a STEM Calculus course upon entering college. However, this course will provide a foundation for students entering a business application Calculus course or other general education mathematics course.

PRE-CALCULUS (SENIOR LEVEL)

This course is designed to incorporate skill required for mathematical or scientific fields of study. Topics include the algebra of functions, transformations involving conic sections, complex numbers, the polar coordinate system, sequences and series, and extensive work with trigonometric identities, equations and inequalities.

MHS Science Course descriptions

Biology I (JUNIOR year)– Pre-requisites: Physical World Concepts & Chemistry

Biology I is a lab science course that investigates the relationship between structure and function from molecules to organisms and systems, the interdependence and interactions of biotic and abiotic components of the environment, and mechanisms that maintain continuity and lead to changes in populations over time. Students explore biological concepts through an inquiry approach. Embedded standards for Inquiry, Technology & Engineering, and Mathematics are taught in the context of the content standards for Cells, Interdependence, Flow of Matter and Energy, Heredity, and Biodiversity and Change.

Biology II –Pre-requisites: Biology I & Chemistry I (senior year science elective)

Biology II is a lab science course in which students engage in an in-depth study of the principles of biology. It is an extension of Biology I with a focus in anatomy, genetics, and ecology. It is recommended for any student who would like to have a career in the medical or medically related field or who will take a freshmen level Biology class in college.

Chemistry I – Pre-requisites: Physical World Concepts, pass Algebra I

SOPHOMORES-must PASS algebra I in order to take this class. Students who are not passing math or who do not pass Algebra I will be taking Biology before Chemistry.

There is an honors section for chemistry which requires a “B” or higher in Algebra I and very hard work ethic. Mrs. Pugh or Mrs. Ramsey are the only teachers who can sign off for students to take Honors Chemistry.

Chemistry I is a laboratory science course in which students investigate the composition of matter and the physical and chemical changes it undergoes. Students use science process skills to study the fundamental structure of atoms, the way atoms combine to form compounds, and the interactions between matter and energy. Students explore chemistry concepts through an inquiry-based approach. Embedded standards for Inquiry, Mathematics, and Technology & Engineering are taught in the content standards for Atomic Structure, Matter and Energy, and Interactions of Matter.

Chemistry II HONORS –Must have taken: Chemistry I and Algebra II. (JR or SR level)

STUDENTS WHO ARE Math and science focus areas must take this

Chemistry II is a laboratory science course that builds on topics introduced in Chemistry I. This class is designed for any student who is planning a career in the medical field, lab field or will be taking freshman level chemistry in college. It includes a more clinical, “hands-on” approach to chemistry with lab and forensic science.

Physical World Concepts – Recommended co-requisite: Algebra I (freshmen)

HONORS: There is an honors section of PWC recommended for students with a B or higher in math. These recommendations come from middle school level teachers.

Conceptual Physics is a laboratory science course that examines the interactions between matter and energy. Students explore physics concepts through an inquiry-based approach. Embedded standards for Inquiry, Technology & Engineering, and Mathematics are taught in context of the content standards for Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Waves and Optics, Electricity and Magnetism, and Atomic & Nuclear Science.

Extra ELECTIVES offered for math and science focus areas.

Human Anatomy and Physiology: biology and chemistry (JR or SR elective)

This is a laboratory science course that includes of an in-depth study of the body systems that maintain homeostasis from anatomical, physiological, and histological perspectives. Students explore anatomical and physiological concepts through an inquiry-based approach. Embedded standards for Inquiry and Technology & Engineering are taught in the context of the content standards for Anatomical Orientation, Protection, Support, and Movement, Integration and Regulation, Transportation, Absorption and Excretion, and Reproduction, Growth, and Development.

Life Time Wellness and Physical Education

The purpose of Health and Physical Education at Monterey High School is to help students take control of their personal, physical, and emotional well-being. We will focus on personal fitness, practical skills, individual and team sports, and real world applications that encourage students to become responsible for their own fitness and well being throughout life.

Social Studies

Economics

Macroeconomic and microeconomic concepts will be addressed. Students will participate in the exploration of news articles, internet, economic theorists, and other written materials to achieve the aims of the course. The aims of this course are to gain an understanding of fundamental economic concepts and their application to a variety of economic systems; to gain the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to function effectively in a technologically expanding global economy and to understand the roles of individuals, business, and government agencies play in the economic world. Topics such as inflation, economic growth/recession and their corresponding relationship to the economy will be included.

United States Government and Civics

This course explores the three levels of government. Students learn the important events leading to the writing of the Constitution and then spend time studying the Constitution. Students will explore important freedoms within the Bill of Rights and Supreme Court cases, which defined those freedoms. The class will survey the three branches of the United States Government. Students will study the federal government and its workings as well as the state and local governments and the responsibility of citizens to each branch.

World History and Geography

This course explores the history and geography of the world from the Renaissance to the present, examining both Eastern and Western history. Students will better understand how past social, political, and economic events have influenced the modern world. Students will develop; organizational, note taking, test taking, and writing skills within the scope of this class.

United States History and Geography: Post-Reconstruction to the Present

Students will examine the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution and America’s growing role in world diplomatic relations, including the Spanish-American War and World War I. Students will study the goals and accomplishments of the Progressive movement and the New Deal. Students will also learn about the various factors that led to America’s entry into World War II, as well as its consequences for American life. Students will explore the causes and course of the Cold War. Students will study the important social, cultural, economic, and political changes resulting from the Civil Rights Movement, the Cold War, and recent events and trends that have shaped modern-day America. Additionally, students will learn the causes and consequences of contemporary issues impacting their world today. Students will continue to use skills for historical and geographical analysis as they examine American history since Reconstruction with special attention to Tennessee connections in history, geography, politics, and people. Students will continue to learn fundamental concepts in civics, economics, and geography within the context of United States history. The reading of primary source documents is a key feature of United States history standards. Finally, students will focus on current human and physical geographic issues important in contemporary America and the global society.

Fine Arts

Art I
Art I introduces the students to the elements of art through the use of various art media and the discussion of famous art works. Art history is explored through art criticism and

Art II
Art as a means of personal expression is developed through the completion of more in-depth art projects. Art criticism focuses on multi-cultural art and American artists. Art projects are more advanced and incorporate ceramics and other crafts.

Concert Choir
The Concert Choir is primarily a performing arts class, and as such, spends the majority of time singing and practicing quality choral literature in 3 and 4 parts, in English and other languages, and from a variety of time periods. Tone quality, proper breathing technique, vowel shape, and diction are given special emphasis. Students are expected to perform in concerts, both formal and casual. Students may audition for Freshman Honors and All-State Choirs. Basic music theory and sight-reading are included and will be tested throughout the year with a final exam at the end of each semester.
The choir student will know his/her particular part of any song performed. He/she will be expected to know basic concepts of music reading. He/she will understand and demonstrate appropriate concert behavior. Above all, it is hoped the student will develop an appreciation for the work and reward of the performing arts.

Theatre Arts- is a course that teaches the history of theatre while preparing students for performance. Students will study pantomime, improvisation, and finally aspects of technical theatre. Students will learn elements of technical theatre such as: stage make-up, lighting, sound, and costumes.

Dual-credit

Dual Enrollment classes are available through Volunteer State Community College, Nashville State Community College, and Tennessee Tech. Students may take classes that fulfill high school graduation requirements and also receive college credits. Approval for this program must be obtained from your high school counselor. Generally the requirements are: 3.0 GPA and ACT scores of English-18, Reading-19 and Math-19.These classes receive extra points on your ranking GPA. Some classes receive 5 points for an A and some receive 6 points for an A.

Department of Special Education

Biology
Students are offered End of Course Biology class as a Biology A and B course.

Algebra 1
Students are offered Algebra I A and B as an alternative to attending a regular classroom. End of Course (Gateway) Tests are only given to students who successfully complete Algebra I B.

English 1, 2, 3, 4
English classes are offered at a slower pace than in the regular classroom setting. English 1 and 2 are both yearlong classes while English 3 and 4 are one-semester classes. Basic English and writing skills are taught to English 1 and 2 classes. Composition writing is focused on during 11th grade and the reading of novels in the 12th grade.


The New Information of the Tennessee Diploma Project will be here for current state information you may go to this link.

http://www.tennessee.gov/education/gradreq.shtml