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Subjects and Predicates

Subjects and Predicates:

 

Every sentence is made up of two parts. The subject means the person or thing the sentence is about. The subject names the person or thing the sentence is about. A simple subject is the main noun or pronoun.

 

The complete subject includes all the words that identify the person or thing the sentence is about:

 

Ex: My Aunt Mary has a cat.

 

The predicate tells what the subject does. The simple predicate is the main verb or verb phrase.

 

The complete predicate includes all the words that tell what the subject of the sentence is or does:

 

Ex: Tim took three marbles from the pile.

 

 

 

 

Sentences can have more than one subject or predicate. A compound subject is two or more subjects with the same predicate. The subjects are usually joined by and or or.

 

A compound predicate is two or more predicates with the same subject. The simple predicates in a compound predicate are usually joined by and, but, or or.

 

If a compound subject has two subjects, the subjects are not separated by commas. If it has three or more subjects they are separated by commas.

 

Ex: Josh, Carrie, and Meg went fishing.

 

If a compound predicate has two predicates, the two predicates are not separated by commas. If it has three or more predicates, they are separated by commas.


Ex: Tonight we will eat, read, and play games.

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