Restoration Projects


Restoration/care of Mauck Meeting House
By: Rod Graves
Spring 2011
 
In the last meeting o the year 2010, the Page County Heritage Association Board of Directors voted unanimously to address the damage from northerm exposure on the back side of the Mauck Meeting House (the Mill Creek side).  Rot and high winds had taken their toll on the logs in the rear of the building over time.  The Heartpine logs in general were in good state, but with time this problem would have gotten much worse.  What we accomplished will ensure that the building will be in a great state of preservation for future generations.  Heartpine period beaded siding (like that on the eves of the structure) copied from the original, was placed over the logs by method of furring strips to accommodate the siding.  Prior to the logs being covered, (in the back only) all the logs were sprayed for any termite damage and then oiled with Rosewood oil to prevent dry rot.  PCHA president, Gary Bauserman, and VP, Rod Graves, donated the materials of pine siding, termite spray, and Rosewood oil.  The work was done architecturally appropriate/accurate in order to save the integrity of the log structure for the long haul.  Rod Graves and the Bausermans oversaw the project.  Local carpenters, Dave Sours, Gilbert Sours, and James Drain, who were part of the the team that helped build the Luray Valley Museum at Luray Caverns, completed the siding project.  The did a great job.

The Mauck Meeting House also received other repairs on the eve siding.  Damaged shutters were replaced, one broken glass was replaced with a period glass, and a few damaged areas to the logs were repaired.  The state of the exposed logs, in general, is excellent, however they will have Rosewood applied to them after the weather breaks.  In addition, Rod Graves has donated and will install two period German Elbow box locks to the doors of the Mauck Meeting House.  They are what would have been on the doors originally.  The Mauck Meeting House preservation and care is paramount to the PCHA, as it is one of the most important historical buildings in the Shenandoah Valley.  Preserving our past is vital to our mission and to our membership.  PCHA board member, Ronnie Kauffman, has donated very generously toward the preservation of the Mauck Meeting House in memory of her late husband, Steve Kauffman, who is sadly missed by all.


Restoration of the Redwell Furnace Office ca. 1787
By: Rod Graves
Spring 2011
 
Luray Caverns Corporation and other interested parties have donated a total of $6,500 over a number of years to restore this very important historic building representing Colonial Iron culture in Virginia.  In early America, Redwell Furnace (later called Isabella Furnace) was the most advanced iron furnace in the western part of the Back Country of Virginia.  The furnace stopped blasting in 1841, but a fabled history was produced nonethless.  It is now owned by the Town of Luray with a cooperative agreement with the PCHA.  The building is located just outside of Luray along the Hawksbill Creek across from the newly-built Hawksbill Greenway.  The building has been secured and repaired from the severe damage, which is suffered in the 1960s.  The inside was re-timbered, and the floor joists were replaced with heavy period timbers in preparation for restored flooring.  The outside was recently pointed up with the original white lime mortar that is truly stunning to see against the limestone.  During the stonework restoration, the chimney, which had been rebuilt in the 1950s with incorrect modern brick was rebuilt again using period brick and and returned to its Federal period appearance.  The chimney throat was also repaired during this time.  Rod Graved and Gary Bauserman oversaw and volunteered their labor toward this restoration.  The inside flooring has been paid for and will be replaced in a matter of weeks.  It took some time to find the right random width 10-12 inch Heartpine material, and it is pretty much from an extinct tree species.  Both floors will be restored and the bottom floor will have the brick floor, as it originally had.  Also in the near future, the plaster walls, the interior wood walls, doors, trim and cabinets will be painted in the original colors.  The outside will need two small porches restored.  It will look as it did in 1787 when completed!  All this will be done as time and funds allow, so please donate to this cause if you are able.  The Redwell/Isabella Furnace site has been designated by the Virginia Department of Historic Resources a Registered Historic District for Page County, Virginia.


Restoration of the Calendine Stage Coach office
By: Rod Graves
Spring 2011
 
Gary Bauserman and Rod Graves oversaw the work of a local stone mason, Clyde Jenkins, who was hired by the PCHA in the later part of 2010, to repair/restore the foundation and supports beneath the Stage Coach structure.  A period fashioned crawl space was installed, which was a great overall improvement.  Also, pine siding was replaced on the northern exposed side that had been rotted by weather.  The  underside of the building was cleaned and sprayed for termites.  During the work, a number of great artifacts were found, including old medicine bottles, a Victorian shoe, and surprisingly, a top to a Circa 1780s colonial five plate jamb stove.  When the weather breaks, we hope to be able to repair the plaster walls inside and replace the period fence and cement posts in front of Calendine. 


Comments