Coursepacket



WEEKS 1, 2, 3, 4
EVERYTHING IS ILLUMINATED, JONATHAN SAFRAN FOER

WEEK 1, 2, 3: LECTURE NOTES/DISCUSSION QUESTIONS and ARTICLES/WEBSITES


WEEK 1: DISCUSSION/LECTURE/QUESTIONS WEEK 1 (download my class notes here) - on Foer's biography, the novel, major themes
TUESDAY: class introductions, policies, expectations, assignments

THURSDAY
: BACKGROUND to author, novel:
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WEEK 2: DISCUSSION/LECTURE/QUESTIONS WEEK 2 Foer continued, Alan Berger article
TUESDAY: Continue Illuminated and background to author, novel:
EXTRAS: 
THURSDAY: (You can sign in on Lakernet and access this article directly, or search for this article on Academic Search Complete)
  • Berger, Alan L. "Unclaimed Experience: Trauma and Identity in Third Generation Writing about the Holocaust." Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies 28.3 (2010): 149-158. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 24 Aug. 2011.
    Berger discusses how Foer's novel represents a unique characteristic of a third generation Holocaust author, and compares his characteristics to two other Holocaust writers of his generation. I thought this was interesting because it communicated how different people (and specifically authors) interpret and express trauma very differently. My only concern with this article is that the section of Foer's work is only about three pages long; it is short, but still applicable to our future discussion of the novel.

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WEEK 3: DISCUSSION/LECTURE/QUESTIONS WEEK 3 - Foer contd.; Collado-Rodriguez article

TUESDAY: Continue Illuminated

  • ARTICLE: (You can sign in on Lakernet and access the article directly, or search for this article on Academic Search Complete)
    Collado-Rodriguez, Francisco
    .
    "Ethics in the Second Degree: Trauma and Dual Narratives in Jonathan Safran Foer's "Everything Is Illuminated.." Journal of Modern Literature 32.1 (2008): 54-68. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 24 Aug. 2011.

    This is a great article that focuses on the form of the novel, and how Foer uses dual representations to blend the realism of the Holocaust with mythical elements of fiction. The author explains how the oscillation between the traumatic events of the Holocaust and the colorful mythical images Foer creates is key to interpreting the novel.

THURSDAY: PAPER 1: Discussion - how to formulate an argument, and organise paragraphs
Type up at least ONE idea for a paper (look over the first page of PAPER 1 instructions). I'll collect your typed responses, and we'll work out how to structure your paper together:
a) What is it that you want to write about? If you have a general interest in something, and don't know how exactly to make it a 'thesis' - don't be terrified. Just write it down. We will make it brilliant.
b) Why is it a significant point that should be explored? (This forces you to find something that is not obvious)
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WEEK 4: DISCUSSION/LECTURE/QUESTIONS WEEK 4 - Foer (End); Jenny Adams article
TUESDAY:

  • DUE: PAPER 1 (at the very beginning of class). 2 FULL pages, Times 12 point font.
  • Complete Foer's Illuminated.
  • Listen to: "Before it had a name" (This American Life, NPR) min. 6:25-29:15ish.

THURSDAY: 

  • Link to Jenni Adams (PDF copy of her book chapter,"The Dream of the End of the World") here - this is the more recent version of her article, which first appeared as an article (below)
  • Adams, Jenni. "The Dream of the End of the World: Magic Realism and Holocaust, History in Jonathan Safran Foer's Everything Is Illuminated." Clio 39.1 (2009): 53-77. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 24 Aug. 2011. (Same material, as it appeared in an article)
  • Begin Extremely Loud
  
 

WEEKS

4, 5, 6, 7


EXTREMELY LOUD
BY JONATHAN SAFRAN FOER 
WEEKS 4, 5, 6, 7: LECTURE NOTES/DISCUSSION QUESTIONS and READING: ARTICLES/WEBSITES

WEEK 4: DISCUSSION/LECTURE/QUESTIONS WEEK 4/5 - notes on Foer, Ochs&Capps article

THURSDAY: Intro to novel (see notes, above)

WEEK 5: 

TUESDAY:

THURSDAY:
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WEEK 6:  DISCUSSION/LECTURE/QUESTIONS WEEK 6 - notes on Foer, Pauline Boss article

TUESDAY  

a) What happened in Dresden? b)Finding the "lock": What could the key and the missing lock represent?

THURSDAY: 
  • ARTICLE (Find in Penfield): Ambiguous Loss Research, Theory, and Practice: Reflections after 9/11. Author: Pauline Boss. 
Source: Journal of Marriage and Family, Vol. 66, No. 3 (Aug., 2004), pp. 551-566
Published by: National Council on Family Relations 
Stable. JSTORE URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3600212 .
  • ASSIGNED: MIDTERM EXAM

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WEEK 7: DISCUSSION/LECTURE/QUESTIONS WEEK 7 - (notes on Foer, articles)

* Select readings for groups 1, 2, 3, 4 *

TUESDAY:

THURSDAY:
                                      WEEK 8: SPRING BREAK
 

WEEKS

8, 9, 10


EATING ANIMALS
BY JONATHAN SAFRAN FOER

WEEK 9: Notes for Week 9, 10 (download here)

TUESDAY:

Optional: 

THURSDAY: EXAM DUE (Film in class)

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WEEK 10: 

TUESDAY: Foer contd.

    THURSDAY: 

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    WEEK 11: 

    TUESDAY: 

    • FILMS:

      • Tanke, Joseph J. "THE CARE OF THE SELF AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS." Ethics & the Environment 12.1 (2007): 79-96. Environment Complete. EBSCO. Web. 25 Aug. 2011.

    THURSDAY: Conferences

    WEEKS 
    12-15

     
    Conferences, meetings, writing time