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Today in English 12...

Thursday, June 9th
We spent today reviewing terms and devices.
POETRY

TYPES OF STANZAS
• couplet (2)
• tercet (3)
• quatrain (4)
• cinquain (5)
• sestet (6)
• septet (7)
• octave (8)

Rhyme: the repetition of similar or duplicate sounds at regular intervals, usually the repetition of terminal sounds of words at the ends of lines.

End Rhyme: rhyme occurring at the ends of verse lines; most common rhyme.

Internal Rhyme
: a word in the middle of the lines rhymes with a word at the end of the line.

Old King Cole was a merry old soul.

Perfect Rhyme: bake / rake

Imperfect Rhyme: the spelling or sound is different – break / snake – come / home

Rhyme Scheme: patterns of rhymes with a unit of verse.

TYPES OF POEMS

A. Narrative: a recording of events, sometimes brief, sometimes long; is highly objective, told by a speaker detached from the action.

1. Epic: a long, dignified narrative poem about the deeds of a traditional or historical hero or heroes of high station.
• dignified style
• battles and Gods

2. Ballads: a narrative poem, usually simple and fairly short, originally designed to be sung.
• refrains
• quatrains
• abcb

B. Lyric: a subjective, reflective poem expressing the thoughts and especially the feelings of a single speaker; has a regular rhyme scheme.

1. Elegy: a dignified poem mourning the death of an individual or of all men.

2. Ode: a lyric poem of some length, serious in subject and dignified in style; a poem praising someone or something.

3. Sonnet: a verse form containing fourteen lines, in English usually iambic pentameter, and a complicated rhyme scheme.

Types of Sonnets:

a. Petrarchan (Italian) Sonnet:
• an octave and sestet
• abba abba cde cde

b. Shakespearean (English) Sonnet:
• three quatrains and a concluding couplet
• rhyming abab cdcd efef gg

C. Descriptive: an impersonal word painting. A truly descriptive poem is objective; that is, the poet is more interested in depicting a scene than in his own emotions.

D. Special Kinds of Poems:

1. Pastoral: depicts country scenes, dealing with shepherds and shepherdesses; its setting is marked by constant summer and fecund nature.

2. Blank Verse: unrhymed lines of iambic pentameter.

But God left free the Will, for what obeys
Reason is free, and Reason he made right,
But bid her well beware, and still erect,
Lest by some fair appearing good surpris’d
She dictate false, and misinform the Will
To do what God expressly hath forbid

3. Free Verse: no consistency in line length, meter, rhyme or stanza form; is very rhythmic, often patterned after the spoken word.

Alliteration
Alliteration is the intentional repetition of similar initial sounds in two or more words. Alliteration is meant to appeal to the sense of sound.

He claps the crag with crooked hands;
Close to the sun in lonely lands.

Assonance
Assonance is the intentional repetition of an internal vowel sound in stressed syllables.

Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are.

Consonance
Consonance is the repetition of internal consonant sounds or end consonant sounds in words.

I caught this morning morning’s minion, kingdom of daylight’s
dauphin, dapple-dawn-drawn Falcon, in his riding
Of the rolling level underneath him steady air…

Onomatopoeia
Onomatopoeia is the use of a word to indicate a sound.
Certain words, such as hiss, bang, meow, imitate the sounds they represent.

Over the cobbles he clattered and clashed in the dark inyard.

Euphony
Euphony is the use of compatible, harmonious sounds to produce a pleasing melodious effect.

And the smooth stream in the smoother numbers flows.

Cacophony (Dissonance)
Cacophony is the use of inharmonious sounds in close conjunction for effect; a harsh, clashing sound.

But when loud surges lash the surrounding shore.

Simile
A simile is a direct comparison between two things, often using the clue words “as,” “like,” “than,” “as…as,” or “so…as”.

Metaphor
A metaphor is an indirect or implied comparison between two things. One thing is talked about as if it were another.

The leaves of life keep falling one by one.

The cherished fields
Put on their robes of purest white.

Extended Metaphor

A metaphor which is drawn-out beyond the usual word or phrase to extend throughout a stanza or an entire poem, usually by using multiple comparisons between the unlike objects or ideas.

Personification
In personification human or personal qualities are given to inanimate things or ideas.

The haughty lion surveyed his realm.
My car was happy to be washed.

Apostrophe
Apostrophe is a direct address to a person or personified object not present.

O’ solitude? Where are the charms
That sages have seen in thy face.

Metonymy
Metonymy is speaking of a thing by the name of some other thing closely related to it.

From the cradle to the grave.
The crown for the monarchy.

Synecdoche
Synecdoche is when a part is used to signify the whole and the whole for a part.

“wheels” for automobile
The factory employed 500 “hands”. (workers)

Hyperbole

Hyperbole is an exaggeration or bold overstatement for the sake of emphasis.

This book weighs a ton.
as old as the hills
drowning in my tears

Allusion
An allusion is a casual reference to a famous historical, biblical or literary figure or event.

I stood still and was a tree amid the wood,
Knowing the truth of things unseen before;
Of Daphne and the laurel bough
And that god-feasting couple old
That grew elm-oak amid the wold.

I know not where is that Promethean heat
That can thy light resume.

Rhetorical Question
A rhetorical question is a question asked in such a way that the answer, being obvious, is not needed.

Was it for this you took such constant care
The bodkin, comb, and essence to prepare?
For this your locks in paper durance bound?
For this with tort’ring irons wreath’d around?
…Gods! shall the ravisher display your hair,
While the fops envy, and the ladies stare?

Paradox
A paradox is a statement which appears self-contradictory or absurd, but turns out to have a valid meaning.

One short sleep past, we wake eternally,
And Death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.

Oxymoron
Oxymoron is the combination of two contradictory terms to form a compressed paradox.

living death
pleasing pains

Pun
A pun is a word used in a double sense in order to produce a humorous effect.

Ben Battle was a soldier bold,
And used to war’s alarms:
But a cannon-ball took off his legs,
So he laid down his arms!

Litotes
A litote is a type of understatement in which an affirmative is expressed by the negative of the contrary.

He is not the brightest man in the world.
She is no beauty.

Euphemism
A euphemism expresses a disagreeable or unpleasant fact in agreeable language.

death being referred to as sleep
a liar as someone with a wonderful imagination

Antithesis
An antithesis involves sharply contrasting ideas being expressed within a balanced grammatical structure.

It was the best of times; it was the worst of times.
He promised wealth and provided poverty!

Parallelism
Parallelism is a similarity in structure.

He tried to make the law clear, precise, and equitable.

Repetition
Repetition is when words, sounds, devices are repeated primarily for the sake of emphasis.

Alone, alone, all, all alone,
Alone on a wide wide sea!

Anaphora
Anaphora is repetition of the same word or group of words at the beginning of successive clauses.

We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the hills. We shall never surrender.

Antimetabole
Antimetabole is repetition of words in successive clauses in reverse grammatical order.

One should eat to live, not live to eat.

Climax
Climax is the arrangement of words, phrases, or clauses in an order of increasing importance.

Let a man acknowledge obligations to his family, his country, and his God.

Anti-Climax or Bathos
This is the opposite of climax. It is a sudden ludicrous descent from the higher to the lower. (Used in satire or ridicule)

You have behaved most treacherously; you have attempted to murder me; and you have blunted my razor.

Epigram
An epigram is a brief, pointed saying that has the nature of a proverb; based on contrast.

Fools rush in where angels fear to tread.

PROSE

Methods of Characterization

An author implicitly (indirectly) reveals a character’s personality and traits by describing his/her:

• physical appearance
• speech (both what is said and how)
• actions
• inner thoughts and feelings
• his/her effect on other characters (what they say or how they act)

or the author can just tell the reader what to think about the character (Explicit).

Types of Character

Flat Character – only one or two traits are developed

Round Character – is complex and many-sided

Stock Character – the stereotyped figure who has occurred so often in fiction he/she is immediately known

Static Character – is the same sort of person at the end of the story as he was at the beginning

Developing
Dynamic Character – undergoes permanent change in some aspect of his character, personality, or outlook

Character Foils – characters who contrast so strongly so that the traits of each are emphasized by contrast with those of the other

Protagonist – the central character, who is trying to accomplish something

Antagonist – the force opposing the protagonist

Three Principals of Convincing Characterization

1. A character must be consistent in his/her behavior unless there is a valid
reason for change.

2. Characters must be clearly motivated: we must be able to understand the
reasons for what they do.

3. Characters must be plausible or lifelike.

OCT09

Mood / Atmosphere

Prose NotesComments Off

The feeling created in the reader by a literary work or passage.

OCT09

Tone

Prose NotesComments Off

Detecting the tone of a story is similar to picking up on tone of voice. It’s not what is being said or done — it’s a matter of how. Tone is how an author expresses his or her attitude about a topic (often through the use of adjectives).

OCT09

Parody

Prose NotesComments Off

Parody is a form of satire that imitates another work of art in order to ridicule it.

OCT09

Satire

Prose NotesComments Off

Satire is a literary technique of writing which principally ridicules its subject (individuals, organisations, states) often as an intended means of provoking change.





Wednesday, June 8th
  • We will review C and D terms. Students will work on their essays - due tomorrow.
Tuesday, June 7th
  • As part of exam preparation we will review A and B terms. Students will work on their essays.
Monday, June 6th
  • Students will be asked to brainstorm topics for their own persuasive pieces, and to begin a rough draft. Essays are due on Thursday, June 9th. 
Friday, June 3rd
  • We will review basic essay structure and read and discuss a student sample. Reading journals are due Monday, June 6th.
Thursday, June 2nd
  • We will read two persuasive pieces related to global warming and discuss the persuasive techniques used.
Wednesday, June 1st
  • We will finish the propaganda project presentations.
  • We will discuss the techniques use in "Let's Go Veggie" and "Where's the Beef".
Tuesday, May 31st
  • We will begin with some propaganda project presentations.
  • Students will be asked to read two persuasive essays: "Let's Go Veggie" and "Where's the Beef". They will be expected to identify techniques used in both pieces: highlighting and labelling. Due tomorrow.
Tuesday, May 24th - Monday, May 30th
I will be in Knoxville, Tennessee until Monday, May 30th with my Destination Imagination team at Global Finals. During this time, students will be working on their propaganda projects. Monday will be the final day to complete the projects. Presentations will take place on Tuesday, May 31st.
Thursday, May 19th. 
Please gather up any old magazines you have at home and bring them with you on Tuesday.
  • We will begin with silent reading
  • Students will have about 30 minutes to complete their essays.
  • We will be reviewing argumentation and persuasion (techniques).

ARGUMENTATION - attempts to convince through logic.

Argumentation takes two opposite forms, deduction and induction.


Deduction accepts a general principle as true, then applies it to specific cases.

Major premise: All men are mortal.

Minor premise: Socrates is a man. GOOD ARGUMENT

Conclusion: Socrates is mortal.


BAD Major premise: Progress is good.

ARGUMENT Minor premise: The automobile represents progress.

Conclusion: The automobile is good.


The problem with deduction is that we cannot always agree on premises.


Induction is the opposite of deduction. It first observes particular cases, then from them formulates a general rule.


After a summer in the factory Joan thought she could afford a car, so the week before 

school began she bought a sporty red three-year-old japanese model. Speeding around 

town with the stereo turned up was so much fun that she didn’t mind the $350-a-month 

payments. But when the insurance company hit her for $2500 as a new driver, her savings 

took a dive. Each month she found herself paying $100 for gas and $150 for parking. A fall

tune-up set her back $200, and new tires $400. Then came the repairs: $250 for brakes,

$350 for a clutch, and $225 for an exhaust system. In desperation Joan took a part-time 

job selling shoes. That helped her bankbook but took her study time. Two weeks after 

exams, holding a sickly grade report in her hand, Joan decided to sell the car. Nobody could 

have told her to, since, like most people, she likes to make up her own mind. But the long 

string of evidence did the teaching: now Joan knows, through induction, that as a student 

she cannot afford a car.


PERSUASION - attempts to convince through emotion.

Major techniques:

Word choice: Is an oil spill an “incident,” an “accident,” a “mistake,” a “crime” or an “environmental tragedy”? Writers tend to choose the term that reflects their feeling and the feeling they hope to encourage in the readers.

Example: An attempt to show old people as active may be helped by the example of your grandmother who skis.

Repetition: Intentional repetition can build feeling.

Hyperbole (exaggeration): This is used in humorous pieces. “Man You’re a Great Player!” - Gary Lautens. 

Analogy and figures of speech: Analogies, comparing one thing with another from a different category (a monster with the forest industry), and their shorter cousins similes and metaphors, are powerful tools of persuasion.

Irony: “My Body Is My Own Business” - Naheed Mustafa

Appeal to authority or prestige: We invite our readers to believe what a judge says about law, or what an educator says about education. This approach appeals to our reader’s ethical sense: he or she believes these people know the facts and tell the truth.

Fright: A frightened reader is an interested reader. Frighten a reader only with facts that really are scary (such as the number of times computer error nearly launched a Third World War).

Climax: After a good introduction, start with your least dramatic point, then progress upward to your strongest.

Wednesday, May 18th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will have time to work on our individual "Be-er and Do-ers" and "The Most Powerful Question a Parent Can Ask..." synthesis essays. Essays should be handed in by the end of the class on Thursday, May 19th.
Tuesday, May 17th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will quickly review our outlines before reading and assessing student samples of synthesis essays. 
  • Students may have time to work on their synthesis essays for "Be-ers and Do-ers" and "The Most Powerful Question a Parent Can Ask...".
Monday, May 16th, 2011
  •  We will begin with silent reading.
  • Today, students will read two synthesis pieces: "Happyness for Sale" and "Circus in Town". They will gather information in order to address the topic: Assess the role optimism plays in the lives of Jenny in "Circus in Town" and Chris Gardner in "Happyness for Sale".
  • As a class, we will share our thinking and create an outline.
Friday, May 13th, 2011
The students will continue working on their drafts. They should be completed by the end of the class.
Thursday, May 12th, 2011
Today, I organized students into groups of three to work on a synthesis group essay on the short story "Be-ers and Do-ers" by Budge Wilson and the article "The Most Powerful Question a Parent Can Ask..." by Neil Millar. The students read and discussed the two pieces and began working on their drafts. 
Wednesday, May 11th, 2011
Students worked on a second Original Composition (O.C.) using the topic of regret.
Tuesday, May 10th, 2011
Our new focus is regret.
Poem "Regret" by Bruce Reisner.
Short Story "Early Autumn" by Langston Hughes.
Monday, May 9th, 2011
  • We will watch a short video clip dealing with the Original Composition section of the exam.
  • Students will have time to work on their own pieces. Topic: stereotypes.
  • When they are finished, they will have time for silent reading.
Friday, May 6th, 2011
  • We will finish our evaluation activity. Students will have time to brainstorm a topic related to stereotyping for their own O.C.s which will be written in class on Monday. Students are allowed to bring an outline with them for the in-class write. 
Thursday, May 5th, 2011
  • We will continue to discuss the Original Composition of the exam. In groups, using a rubric, students will read and evaluate samples.
Wednesday, May 4th, 2011
  • We will be discussing the Original Composition of the exam. I will share a student sample of a narrative about stereotyping, as well as modelling brainstorming for writing about this topic.
  • They will have some time in the lab to finish their essays - due tomorrow
Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011
  • We will finish watching The Crucible, before heading to the lab to work on the good copies of our essays - due Thursday, May 5th.
Monday, May 2nd, 2011
  • We will be discussing specific examples of persecution today, before continuing to watch The Crucible.
Friday, April 29th, 2011
  • Students will work on the drafts of their "And Summer is Gone" essays - due Monday.
Thursday, April 28th, 2011
  • Today we will be watching The Crucible.
Wednesday, April 27th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will be reading the short story "And Summer Is Gone" by Susie Kretschmer.
  • Students must have a thesis (discussing contrast), key points and quotes for support by Friday, April 29th. 
Tuesday, April 26th, 2011
Reading Journals are due.
  • We will begin with silent reading. (The Crucible - Act 2)
  • We will finish our work with sentence combining.
  • We will review synthesis writing. The students will have a chance to look at their first essays and set goals for the next piece.
In an excerpt from Nature Lessons, Marco and his daughter, Mary, do not share the same values; in fact, on most occasions, their values differ immensely. Mary comes from Los Angeles to visit Marco, in Alaska, and they find themselves having quite opposite interests. While Marco is content in nature and the outdoors, Mary is used to the hustle and bustle of the big city. This is one of the main, contributing factors to their opposing views on life.

Mary does not have the same appreciation for the wilderness as Marco does. Marco is fulfilled and at ease in the outdoors, “[sharing] encounters with God’s other creatures, [that’s what he values] most about living in the woods.”. Whereas, Mary’s idea of a satisfying encounter with “God’s creatures”, is going to Sea World. While reading Marco’s thoughts on Sea World, you can tell that he’s filled with contempt. He realizes that his daughter would prefer to see orcas in tanks, balancing balls on their noses, rather than seeing them in the beauty of their natural habitat. Throughout the story, Marco wishes that Mary would embrace their activities with the same keen interest as he does. But, “He couldn’t seem to hold her attention with the small flowers or the places on the trees where porcupines had eaten the bark.”; he can tell that she would rather be experiencing the city life.
  • We will discuss Act 1 of The Crucible before watching it.
Thursday, April 21st, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will continue to work on sentence types/combining.
  • We will finish watching "The Burning Times".
Wednesday, April 20th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will continue to work on sentence types/combining.
  • We will continue to watch "The Burning Times".
Tuesday, April 19th, 2011
Students will attend the all candidates meeting.
Monday, April 18th, 2011
  • The power of words: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hzgzim5m7oU 
  • We will begin with silent reading. Students should read Act I of The Crucible. They will have a reading journal based on Act I due on Tuesday, April 26th.
  • We will continue to work on sentence types/combining. (worksheet)
  • We will continue to watch "The Burning Times".
Thursday, April 14th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will continue to work on sentence types/combining.
  • As an introduction to our study of the play The Crucible by Arthur Miller, we will discuss intolerance/persecution as well as the McCarthy Era.
  • We will begin watching the NFB documentary "The Burning Times" as part of our preparation for reading The Crucible
Wednesday, April 13th, 2011
Students will have time to edit their drafts. Good copies are due on Monday, April 18th.
Tuesday, April 12th, 2011
  • We will continue our discussion of sentence types. We will work on sentence combining.
  • Students will have some time to work on their drafts. They should have a completed draft, ready to peer-edit, for tomorrow.
Monday, April 11th, 2011
  • In preparation for a discussion of writing style, today we will review sentence types (simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex), and how they are properly punctuated.
  • Students will have some time to work on their drafts. Good copies are due on Monday, April 18th.
Friday, April 8th, 2011
Thursday, April 7th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We'll review comparison/contrast essays. Student Sample
  • Working in groups, students will share their points for analyzing "Nature Lessons" before a class share. 
  • They will have time to start to draft their essays.
Wednesday, April 6th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will continue with our focus on deep reading as we work on analyzing "Nature Lessons" and writing a comparison/contrast piece.
Tuesday, April 5th, 2011
  • We will be attending a workshop with writer/professor Matt Hooton. 
Monday, April 4th, 2011
Comparison/Contrast Essays Due
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will begin our second comparison/contrast essay. This time we will focus on analyzing a short story: "Nature Lessons".
Friday, April 1st.
Reading Journals Due
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will read and discuss another example of comparison/contrast writing: "Chicken Hips". (Act of Writing)
  • The students will have some time to work on their essays. Essays must be posted by Saturday morning in order to be edited by me.
Thursday, March 31st, 2011
Essay Drafts Due
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • I will pair writers and editors. Students will then read and edit essays.
Wednesday, March 30th, 2011
  • We will review irony (dramatic, verbal, situational, and structural). Prose Notes.
  • We will read the contrast essay "A Nice Place to Visit," by Russell Baker. (Act of Writing) We will be discussing the use of irony and hyperbole in the piece, as well as paying attention to the use of specific examples/details. 
Tuesday, March 29th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will work on the drafts for our comparison/contrast essays. Due Thursday.
Monday, March 28th, 2011

Table Tennis and Court Tennis

There are many games that have similarities to the point where, as a casual observer, one might dismiss them as the same. One pair of these games is table tennis and court tennis. However, there are many differences between them which are ignored or overlooked by people inexperienced in both of these entertaining games.

The most obvious distinction is the equipment. Table tennis is played by two people at either end of a miniaturized tennis court painted on a table. The “court” and net are small, set on a glossy table to promote bouncing for the ball. In court tennis, the court is very outsized and entirely carpeted with Astroturf, complete with the same white division lines as table tennis. The balls in either of these games differ in the fact that one is plastic, smooth, hard, and hollow, while the other is green, textured with fuzz, and flexible. To hit the ball, one must have a certain tool for either game to accommodate the differences in their playing piece. In table tennis there is a small wooden or plastic paddle with a thin rubber lining meant to propel and bounce back a hard, plastic white ball, while court tennis players utilize the bigger size and solid mesh wiring of a racket to hit a softer, rubbery ball.

Another distinction between table tennis and court tennis is the involvement of players in the game. Due to the smaller size of a table tennis “court”, the player does not have to move very much. The end of a table spans approximately four feet and there isn’t any need to move out of that area. A player in table tennis would most involve their lower arm because the ball being hit is light and easy to move. In court tennis, you find yourself standing on a large court around which one must move as hard and fast as possible on their side of the net to hit the ball, which isn’t as easy to propel as the light ball of table tennis. In this way, court tennis is much more intense and clearly of more fitness and calorie burning value. While court tennis develops a stronger and healthier body, table tennis would expand a player’s delicate and quick-thinking reflexes.

Finally, there is the distinction between accommodations and ease of use in everyday life. Table tennis is composed of a small ball, petite paddles and a large table. All table tennis sets are built with storage capabilities and can be folded up and packed away with ease. Table tennis sets require very little cleaning under normal use and can last more than a lifetime. Because of the simplicity and low cost of having a table tennis court, it is more commonly found and considered less of a privilege to have one. Court tennis is more likely to be played in leisure courts found in one’s parks, recreation centers, and sports centers. Most tennis court memberships are free or at a low cost with more expensive ones usually found in places outside of the previous mentioned places. Unlike table tennis, a private court in your home would be extremely costly. Tennis courts require a lot of maintenance and cleaning and do not fold up and fit in your closet. They are more commonly found in the homes of the upper class who can afford to have someone clean and maintain their courts on a weekly basis. Given that the upper class represents a smaller portion of the population, tennis courts are less common.

Court tennis and table tennis differ in many ways. The equipment found in either of them differs in size and the materials they are made from to accommodate a different game. Involvement in table tennis is much smaller, versus the larger, more intense involvement of a player in court tennis. With accommodations for either of them in a person’s home differing in cost and the level of maintenance required, it is apparent that one or the other will appeal to a person depending on their lifestyle. With these differences addressed, it shouldn’t be difficult to distinguish between these two games.

  • Students will have time to work on their own pieces.
Friday, March 18th, 2011
Mandalas are due.
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will go over the chart for "An Ode to the User-Friendly Pencil".
  • Students will have time to brainstorm their own comparison/contrast topics, and, using a venn-diagram, begin to look for points of comparison and contrast. 
Thursday, March 17th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading. 
  • We will have a quiz on colon/semi-colon use.
  • We will discuss indeterminate endings (based on Oryx and Crake).
  • We will review comparison/contrast essay writing, before reading "An Ode to the User-Friendly Pencil" and mapping its points using a chart I will provide.

Because they involve at least two subjects and offer the possibility of doing several things, comparison and contrast pieces pose problems of focus and organization.

FOCUS

First you face the question of whether to deal only with points of likeness or of difference, or to treat both. You must be clear about the focus in your own mind and make it equally clear to the reader.

A second problem of focus concerns the subjects. Will you concentrate upon one subject or treat both as equally important? If, for instance, you are writing about high school and university, you have three possibilities of focus: on high school, on university, or on both. This focus must be made clear to the reader, but without the obviousness of a sentence like the following:

In this essay I shall be chiefly concerned with high school.

Work with a lighter hand. For example, if you wish to concentrate on high school:

In many ways high school is like university.

If upon university:

In many ways university is like high school.

And if upon both:

University and high school are alike in many ways.

ORGANIZATION

A second problem posed by comparison and contrast involves organization. When you compare any two subjects – call them A and B – you must do so with regard to specific points – 1, 2, 3, and so on. You may organize your material in two ways – either:

A.
1.
2.
3.

B.
1.
2.
3.

or:

1.
A.
B.

2.
A.
B.

3.
A.
B.

In an essay about high school and university, you could devote the first half to high school and discuss such specifics as teachers, lessons and homework; and spend the second half on university, treating the same points, preferably in the same order. Or you could organize around the particular similarities or differences. In the first paragraph of the body you would discuss teachers, in high school then in university; in the second, lessons; and in the third, homework.

Neither method of organizing is inherently better. Proceeding by A and B stresses each subject in its totality. Organizing by 1, 2, 3, emphasizes specific likenesses or dissimilarities. But while neither method is absolutely superior, one will probably serve your purpose better on any specific occasion. 

Wednesday, March 16th, 2011
  • This is the last day that students will have to work on their mandalas (due tomorrow).
Tuesday, March 15th, 2011
  • We will review semi-colon use, and using commas with two or more adjectives. (Grammar)
  • Students will have time to work on their mandalas.
Monday, March 14th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Students will have time to work on their mandalas (due Thursday).
Friday, March 11th, 2011
  • We will connect what has happened in Japan to themes/issues touched on in the novel Oryx and Crake.
  • Students will have time to finish their literary paragraphs (using Google Docs) for the use of contrast in the poem "Summer in the Yakima Valley".
  • They will have time to read their novels and work on their mandalas. 
Summer in the Yakima Valley
by Ruth Roach Pierson

By day I loved
the farmhouse on the hill
the dust haze the pickup raised
plying the dirt roads
the orchard trees in even
rows down the slopes
and out in all directions
the sigh of apricots
Santa Rosa plums, Bing
and Queen Anne cherries
ripening in the dry heat
the long-short snick snick
of the sprinklers’ jerky rotation
hum and hiss of a low-flying
spray plane
In over-the-knees rubber boots
my cousin and I stomped
the uneven ground    careful
of cow pies and Canadian thistles
plucked alfalfa shoots
to stick between our teeth
swaggered like cowboys
to the edge of the irrigation ditch
and stripped to swim in its muddied water
giddy on the danger of going too near
the whirlpool pull
of the main pipe’s undertow

But after dark
in the attic room
in that house on the top of the hill
he always fell asleep first,
my cousin, leaving me
to listen alone
to the sounds of the night
the valley now as alien
as the other side of the moon—
a coyote’s hungry cry
the twist and scrape of tumbleweed
like a wind-tossed tangle of bones
over clay-dry earth
a jackrabbit caught
in the beam from a jeep’s headlight
Exiled in the moon-engorged room
I lay prey to the sick
ache, the hunger for home
as nightmare shadows slid
across the floor, loomed
on the wall over my head
and everywhere the eerie
whine of the wind aprowl
in the Yakima Valley by night—
weedy, persistent, atonal

Thursday, March 10th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will share our T-Chart information, as a class, and complete the following chart.
  • We will look at, and critique, samples of literary paragraphs about the poem, using our class created criteria.
  • Students will have time to work on their mandalas.
Wednesday, March 9th, 2011
This is a shortened block due to an assembly and early dismissal. T-Charts are due.
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Students will have time to work on their mandalas. 
Tuesday, March 8th, 2011
Second Snapshot is due.
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will be reading and discussing the poem "Summer in the Yakima Valley".

  • As part of our discussion we will review alliteration, assonance and consonance. (Poetry Notes)
  • Students will be asked to find examples of contrast (differences) in the poem, and to create a T-Chart listing these differences (including quotes for support). The T-Charts will be collected in class tomorrow.
Monday, March 7th, 2011
Reading Journal 5 is due.
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Students will make any needed changes to their documents and submit for evaluation. 
Friday, March 4th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will be transferring our snapshots (edited by me) to a Google Doc. Students will be asked to share their documents with two other students in the class. These students will be asked to make at least two corrections or comments on each piece they edit. I will model the kinds of changes or comments that could be made.
Thursday, March 3rd, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Our mini-lesson focused on language. We discussed formal and informal language; archaic, colloquial, dialect, jargon and slang. (Prose Notes)
Tuesday, March 1st, 2011
  • We will be working on our in-class snapshots today. They should be completed by the end of class.
  • Students can silent read once they are finished writing their pieces.
Monday, February 28th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will be brainstorming (topics and details) for our next snapshot assignment using Two Facts and a Fiction and WWF (timed writing).
  • Students will have time to work on their drafts, which will be completed in class tomorrow. They should write their goal for this piece at the top of their papers.
  • If there is time, they can work on their mandalas.
We will read up to Chapter 12 of Oryx and Crake for Friday.

Friday, February 25th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will continue our discussion of goal setting. Michael Jordan.
Students need to:
    • identify their goal.
    • initiate a plan of action.
    • monitor their progress.
    • reflect on their learning.
    • self-assess.
  • Students will have some time to work on their mandalas.
Thursday, February 24th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Students will have time to finish their literary paragraphs. (Good copies are due Monday.)
  • If there is time, they will start working on their mandalas.
Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Students will have time to work on their literary paragraphs on Google Docs.
Tuesday, February 22nd, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will review student notes for "Mother to Son" related to extended metaphor. 
  • Using a student model, together we will develop criteria for the literary paragraph.
Mother to Son by Langston Hughes
Well, son, I'll tell you:
Life for me ain't been no crystal stair.
It's had tacks in it,
And splinters,
And boards torn up,
And places with no carpet on the floors
Bare.
But all the time
I'se been a-climbin' on,
And reachin' landin's,
And turnin' corners,
And sometimes goin' in the dark
Where there ain't been no light.
So, boy, don't you turn back.
Don't you set down on the steps.
'Cause you finds it's kinder hard.
Don't you fall now
For I'se still goin', honey,
I'se still climbin',
And life for me ain't been no crystal stair.

In the poem "Mother to Son" a certain image dominates. This image, a staircase, is also an extended metaphor for the speaker's life. The mother says her staircase has had "places with no carpet on the floor/Bare," and areas with "splinters" and "tacks". The reader can take this to mean that her life has had many obstacles and challenges for her to overcome. The speaker also refers to parts of the staircase that are "dark/Where there ain't been no light". This illustrates that at times she has felt alone and hopeless. Despite these hardships, the mother tells her son that she continues to climb, "reachin' landin's/and turnin' corners". The speaker is evidently resilient, adapting to unexpected changes, and she encourages her son to persevere when he finds his own life to be "kinder hard", telling him not to "turn back" or "set down on the steps". The extended metaphor clearly illustrates that life can be far from easy, but you should never give up.  
  • Students will then (using the criteria they have developed) begin to work on a literary analysis paragraph based on the conflict found in the short story "On the Rainy River".
Monday, February 21st, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will review how to read a poem.
  • We will be reading the poem "Mother to Son" by Langston Hughes. (handout)
  • Students will analyze the poem individually and in literature discussion groups.
Friday, February 18th, 2011
Reading journal #3 is due.
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • The students will read "On the Rainy River" from Imprints 12 - p.70.
  • They will be asked to create a theme statement for the story, focused on courage. They will also be asked to identify types of conflict found in the story (supported with specific examples from the text).
Thursday, February 17th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • There will be a quick quiz on correcting comma splices.
  • Students will share their theme statements from "The Large Ant".
  • We will watch a short video: http://www.flixxy.com/game-of-survival.htm
  • Using the video, we will review plot. (Prose Notes)
Wednesday, February 16th, 2011
Snapshots are due today. I should receive either a paper copy or an invite to a Google Doc. Don't forget to include your self-assessment.
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will review theme and theme statements. (Prose Notes)
  • We will be reading the short story "The Large Ant" in Imprints 12 - p.150. Students will be asked to create and share a theme statement based on the story.
Tuesday, February 15th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • I will explain the mandala project.
Create a mandala for four main characters. (This may be done in a group.) At the center of the mandala, you should include the title of the play (underlined) and the name of the author. The first ring should include the names of your characters. The second ring should contain three character traits for each character. The third ring should contain three quotes (including page numbers) or paraphrases. Each quote or paraphrase should support one of the traits you have identified. The fourth ring should include a theme statement. Outside of the rings, you must create a symbol for each character.
  • We will review symbol and symbolism. (Prose Notes)
  • We will begin to examine sentence types (simple and compound) and how to fix run-on sentences (comma splices). (Grammar)

Monday, February 14th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • This will be the last day that students have to work on their snapshots and self-assessments. (handout)

Friday, February 11th, 2011
The second reading journal is due today.
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Students will be working on their snapshots.

Thursday, February 10th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading. 
  • We will review characterization and character types. (Prose Notes)
The second reading journal will be due tomorrow.

Wednesday, February 9th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading. Students should have read up to chapter 6 for tomorrow.
  • We will be working on our snapshots.
Tuesday, February 8th, 2011
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will review allusion.
  • We will review the criteria and read another snapshot example.
From Walter Dean Myers' book Slam
When it's late night you hear the sound of car doors and people talking and boom boxes spilling out the latest tunes. When it rains the tires hiss on the street and when there's a real rain with the wind blowing sometimes you can hear it against the tin sign over Billy's bicycle shop. If there's a fight you hear the voices rising and catching each other up. The sound of broken glass can cut through other noises, even if it's just a bottle of wine somebody dropped. And behind all the other sounds there's always the sirens, bringing their bad news from far off and making you hold your breath until they pass so you know it ain't any of your people who's getting arrested or being taken to the hospital. p.2
 
  • Students will have time to work on their pieces and to conference with me.
Friday, February 4th, 2011
Reading journal 1 is due today.
  • We will begin with silent reading. The students are expected to have read up to chapter 6 for Thursday, February 10th.
  • I will share an example of a snapshot from Annie Dillard's Pilgrim at Tinker Creek.
  • We will be working with Google Docs today. http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/watch?v=A7y7NafWXeM
  • Students will create a Google Doc for their snapshots and begin to work on a draft.
Thursday, February 3rd, 2011
All students who bring their novels containing at least 3 post-it notes marking where they have a question, or noticed something interesting, will receive a delicious surprise.
  • We'll begin with silent reading.
  • I'll model literature circles before the students move into their groups.
  • During the discussion groups, the students should take notes for their journals, which are due tomorrow.
  • We'll continue with brainstorming for our snapshots. I'll model. There will be two handouts related to sensory details.
  • If there is time, students will begin gathering details for their own topics. 
Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011
  • In preparation for the reading journals, which are due on Friday, we will discuss what we know about the setting of the novel based on what we have read so far.
  • This will also give us a chance to review onomatopoeia, cacophony/dissonance, euphony, and imagery. (poetry notes)...
  • and will be a nice lead into snapshot writing.
A snapshot is a written picture of a moment in time. Unlike a physical photograph, when you write, you're taking a complete sensory picture. You can discuss the smells, textures, sounds, and sensations in addition to the sights. 

More importantly, though, you are able to capture a feeling. All of the details should lead the reader somewhere. The same sun can be an oppressive weight or a comforting embrace. The things you include--and the words you use to describe them---create the atmosphere/mood of the piece.
  • We will be brainstorming for topics.
Snowman wakes before dawn. He lies unmoving, listening to the tide coming in, wave after wave sloshing over the various barricades, wish-wash, wish-wash, the rhythm of heartbeat. He would so like to believe he is still asleep. On the eastern horizon there's a greyish haze, lit now with a rosy, deadly glow. Strange how that colour still seems tender. The offshore towers stand out in dark silhouette against it, rising improbably out of the pink and pale blue of the lagoon. The shrieks of the birds that nest out there and the distant ocean grinding against the ersatz reefs of rusted car parts and jumbled bricks and assorted rubble sound almost like holiday traffic. Out of habit he looks at his watch: stainless-steel case, burnished aluminum band, still shiny although it no longer works. He wears it now as his only talisman. A blank face is what it shows him: zero hour. It causes a jolt of terror to run through him, this absence of official time. Nobody nowhere knows what time it is. Calm down, he tells himself. 


Tuesday, February 1st, 2011

  • We will begin with silent reading. The students should have read up to "Downpour" (page 46 or 51, depending on the edition) for Thursday. They should also take notes on their reading to refer to during the literature circle discussion.
  • We will begin our discussion of goal setting...
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pf-HDWRmRUc 
  • ... and we will practice setting some simple SMARTER goals that we'll keep track of over the next three days. 
Monday, January 31st, 2011
WELCOME TO ENGLISH 12
  • Today we will go over the course outline (available on this site).
  • I will distribute the literary terms and devices list for English 12. (handout)
  • We will pick up our texts from the library. Our anthologies will be Imprints 12 and Act of Writing, and our novel will be Oryx and Crake.
  • We will be discussing the reading journal criteria (handout and see below).
  • We will review setting, essential setting, mood/atmosphere, and tone. (prose notes).
  • Students will have some time for silent reading.

Evaluation of reading journals will be based on the following scoring guide:

Summary: 6/10
If your reading journals are plot summaries, your reading journal grade will be a C.

Connections: 7/10 – 8/10
Your journals must connect plot events to your personal experiences. You should write about both the plot events and the effect the book has on you. Listed here are triggers for beginning such responses. (Select only one trigger for each reading journal – and only if you cannot generate your own original idea.)

• As I read the part about…, I began to think of…
• I know the feeling of…, because I…
• I was surprised…
• If I had been (character’s name), I…
• based on…, I predict…

Sentences must be well crafted and paragraphs well organized.

Author’s Craft: 9/10 – 10/10
You will write a response as described above (connections) plus an additional paragraph on some aspect of the author’s craft. Such comments might include:

• Telling about a section that you really liked and explaining why
• Telling about the author’s use of figurative language (simile…)
• The use of foreshadowing or suspense
• Effective or ineffective use of dialogue
• Themes
• Comparison to other books (similar settings, characters…)
• Analysis of character or comment on character development

To receive an A, you must make your point by basing your response on a
specific quote(s).

During group discussions, you will have the opportunity to compare interpretations, share visualizations, correct misunderstandings and make connections and predictions. Please make use of this valuable resource in your journal entries. Take the time to reflect on and revise (if necessary) your initial responses.

You need a rich vocabulary to be a strong writer. The best way to acquire a rich vocabulary is to read at every opportunity. Although you will absorb many new words merely by meeting them frequently, you will accelerate the assimilation of new words if you will take the trouble to look up the meaning of unfamiliar words as you meet them. Write these words, their definitions, and the sentences they are used in, into your journal.

Sample #1
“Boys and Girls” is interesting in that it explores how strongly society influences the way that we think and act; and it’s surprising to see how even the girl’s own mother and father, entrenched in their traditional way of thinking, disregard her unique qualities and expect their daughter to develop into their vision of a young woman.

It helps that the story is told very bluntly from the perspective of the girl herself, because soon enough it becomes evident that she is subconsciously accepting the stereotype of becoming a delicate young woman, taking to adorning her bed with frilly sheets and dreaming about being rescued by men, as opposed to her old habits of being afraid of what lurked in the corner of her room and being the one to do the rescuing in her dreams. The girl telling the story ends up becoming more feminine whether she likes it or not simply because she is expected to, with the last lines of the story showing her resignation as she accepts that she is “only a girl”. She basically accepts the inevitable, assuming that if so many people expect her to become something, then they must be correct.

I can relate somewhat to the story in that my own father is a landscaper, and so as I grew up I would always go to work with him and try to help him out. I would do menial tasks and always try and do my best to impress him in front of the workers. As I got older I became less and less interested in the kind of work my dad did, and hated having to go to work, even when I would get paid. The girl in the story however, would love nothing more than to keep working with her father, but is being pulled towards her mother, almost against her will. It is clear that the narrator expects that her younger brother Laird is too erratic and absent minded to assume her duties, wondering how such an immature little boy could ever be expected to do the job she is so good at. In her world, she is superior to her brother, yet to the outside world she is seen as just a girl, going through a confusing stage of adolescence who will be replaced in her duties by Laird once he gets a bit older. She sees her mother’s life as dismal and drab, yet she will probably grow up to do the same thing, accepting it as a fact of life because that is what she truly thinks women must do. Having watched her mother conform to that kind of stereotype ingrains that kind of mentality in her just as much as in the men around her.

Sample #2

“No Renewal” is a dystopian look at the future written from the perspective of the past. In this short story, an elderly man named Douglas Bent is going through the process of making himself a special cup of wintergreen tea for his birthday. As he goes through this seemingly mundane process; the oddities, quirks, and to some horrors, of this world are revealed. The world has run out of petroleum (though cars and consumer electronics are still commonplace). As a result, the area around the Bay of Fundy in Newfoundland has been dug up for the clay that humans now make everything out of. There is no wood left. All the animals have died. Partway through the story, Douglas realises that he doesn’t even know how old he is. In search of an answer, he retreats to his attic where a trunk containing remnants of younger years lies. He eventually finds his birth certificate, which shows that his “expiry date” is today. The story ends with him embracing his imminent euthanasia.

It’s an interesting concept. The author has some very creative ideas that should play out well, but in short, they don’t. At the root of the problems are a number of obvious contradictions and even (prepare yourself) mathematical errors. Most apparent is the fact that though there is no oil left, there are cars. Now of course they could be hydrogen cars or electric cars or solar powered cars or some such. But one undeniable mistake is the existence of the electric clock. The clock would need a housing. The housing could be made out of clay, but the wires inside would also have to be insulated. Wires can’t be insulated with clay. Then there is the “Panic Winter of ‘94″ where they had to burn their 200 year old clock, but then somehow didn’t have to burn the large trunk upstairs. It’s almost like the author had a bunch of good ideas of things that might happen in the future, but had no time to flesh them out or figure out the implications. Then there’s the error with the dates. the period of time from 1989 to 2049 is 60 years, not 50. I hope he fired his editor and took a math course at his community college or something.

Needless to say, I didn’t think much of the story. it seemed poorly thought out and rushed. There are so many dystopian short stories out there that are better than this one. The only really new idea that this one brought to the genre was digging up clay to make up for plastic, and the actual implications of this were nowhere to be found in the story. Perhaps I am so unimpressed because I just watched Manufactured Landscapes last night, but “No Renewal” is just another unoriginal, formulaic, dystopian short story. The idea of compulsory euthanasia, which was clearly intended to pack a powerful dramatic punch, was considerably watered down, as the idea was introduced midstory. That, and he fact that, like most ideas in this story, it’s already been done before way better (like in The Giver).

Wednesday, January 19th - Friday, January 21st, 2011
  • Practice exams will be returned and discussed. Students will select areas they want to continue to work on with my support.
Tuesday, January 18th, 2011
Monday, January 17th, 2011
Friday, January 14th, 2011
  • We will finish with our literary terms and devices today. Don't forget the links below.
  • We'll review exam format and practice the original composition section. 
  • Timed Practice Exams: D/H block - Monday, January 17th. B/F block - Tuesday, January 18th. Be prepared to work through lunch: Bring food.
Thursday, January 13th, 2011
  • This will be the last class time provided to work on the essays which are due on Monday, January 17th.
  • Essays must have been edited by two or three other people (three corrections or comments each).
Tuesday, January 11th, 2011
As promised, here are some links that may prove helpful to you as you prepare for your provincial:
Today, we will continue to work on our synthesis essays. We will be experimenting with Google Docs as a way to peer-edit.
Monday, January 10th, 2011
  • Marks will be posted today and The Crucible essays and projects will be returned and discussed.
  • We will begin to prepare for our synthesis essay by looking at the poem "Wordsmith" by Susan Young and the short story "The Gold Mountain Coat" by Judy Fong-Bates. Students will be asked to create a list of possible comparison/contrast topics for the two pieces. Topics so far include the contrasting relationships the fathers have with their children, and the contrast in family values, symbolism and theme.
  • Today's literary terms...
MelodramaA drama, such as a play, film, or television program, characterized by exaggerated emotions, stereotypical characters, and interpersonal conflicts. (Soap Opera)
ParodyA literary or artistic work that imitates the characteristic style of an author or a work for comic effect or ridicule.
Pathos: A quality that arouses emotions (especially pity or sorrow).
Propaganda: The planned use of any form of communication designed to affect the minds, emotions and actions of a given group for a specific purpose. 
Proverb: A short saying that is frequently used that expresses a basic truth. Practice makes perfect. Honesty is the best policy.

Friday, January 7th, 2011
  • Today's literary terms...
frame story (also frame taleframe narrative, etc.) employs a narrative technique whereby an introductory main story is composed, at least in part, for the purpose of setting the stage for a fictive narrative or organizing a set of shorter stories, each of which is a story within a story. The frame story leads readers from the first story into the smaller one within it.
Foreshadowing is a literary technique used by many authors to provide clues for the reader to be able to predict what might occur later on in the story. 
Flashback is a transition (in literary or theatrical works or films) to an earlier event or scene that interrupts the normal chronological development of the story.
Interior Monologuepresenting a character's inner thoughts and emotions in a direct, sometimes disjointed or fragmentary manner.
Internal Rhyme: Old King Cole was a merry old soul.
Juxtaposition: is the idea of putting two contrasting ideas side by side. For example, Michael Moore uses juxtaposition in Fahrenheit 911, when he plays the song “What a Wonderful World” while showing scenes of war and violence. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6Kic2KTGj
  • We will discuss (go over) "Railway Car Blues" prior to the students handing in their paragraphs.
Thursday, January 6th, 2011
  •     We continue with our literary terms....
Active Voice: The object receives the action of the verb. Cats eat fish. Everybody drinks water.
Passive Voice: The object of the active verb becomes the subject of the passive verb. Fish are eaten by cats. Water is drunk by everybody.
Caricature: A description of a person exaggerating some characteristics.
Cliche: A saying or expression that has been overused, losing its power. What goes around comes around.
Didactic: Intended to teach. Parables are didactic.
Epilogue: Found at the end of a piece - an explanation.
Prologue: Found at the beginning of a piece - preparation.
Epiphany: A sudden moment of insight - revelation. Gravity.
Epigram: A short, light hearted, witty poem. Satire.
You're rich and young, as all confess, And none denies your loveliness; But when we hear your boastful tongue, You're neither pretty, rich, nor young.
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011
  • We begin our final review of the literary terms that will appear on the exam. (See below.)
  • The students will have the class to complete their character essays. I will collect them at the end of the block.
Allegory is a form of extended metaphor, in which objects, persons, and actions in a narrative, are equated with the meanings that lie outside the narrative itself. The underlying meaning has moral, social, religious, or political significance, and characters are often personifications of abstract ideas as charity, greed, or envy. Thus an allegory is a story with two meanings, a literal meaning and a symbolic meaning. For example, in Lord of the Flies, Piggy could represent the rational side of humanity. 

Analogy: drawing a comparison in order to show a similarity in some respect: "the operation of a computer presents an interesting analogy to the working of the brain".

Antithesis: opposition, or contrast of ideas or words in a balanced or parallel construction. "To err is human, to forgive divine." "One small step for man, one giant leap for all mankind."

Anecdotal evidence is often used in place of clinical or scientific evidence, and may completely ignore research or harder evidence that points to an opposite conclusion. For example, "My grandfather smoked like a chimney and died when he was 95, so smoking can't be that bad for your health."

An aside is words spoken to the audience or perhaps to another character while other characters are on stage. The other characters pretend to not hear and we the audience get to listen in on  the thoughts. In William Shakespeare's Othello. 

Tuesday, January 4th, 2011
  • We began with a warm-up activity involving figurative language.
  • We reviewed how to write the five (or four) paragraph literary essay.
  • The students had time to create an outline for their character essays based on a character from The Crucible. They will work on these essays in class tomorrow, and I will collect their work at the end of the class.
Wednesday, December 15th, 2010
Reading Journal 2 is due today.
  • Students will continue gathering evidence from the play and begin working on their mandalas, which are due on Friday, December 17th.
Tuesday, December 14th, 2010
  • The students will have time to work on their second journal entry, due tomorrow, before moving on to Act 3.
  • We will finish watching the movie.
Monday, December 13th, 2010
  • We will review fable, farce, satire and sarcasm.
  • We should be finished with Act 2 by the end of the class.
Friday, December 10th, 2010
Reading Journal 1 is due today.
  • We will be continuing with Act 2.
As promised, here is the link for e-exams. Make sure to let Brenda know on Monday if you would like an e-exam. http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/eassessment/eexams.htm

Thursday, December 9th, 2010
Wednesday, December 8th, 2010
  • We should finish reading and discussing Act 1 today. We may also have time to watch the first act.
Tuesday, December 7th, 2010
  • We will start to read the play. As we read, we will be taking notes on character (including quotes with page numbers). These notes will be essential when we work on the group project (mandala) and the individual essay on character. We will discuss how to create a mandala, today. It should be completed before the holidays. The essay will be written when we return. 
Create a mandala for four main characters. (This may be done in a group.) At the center of the mandala, you should include the title of the play (underlined) and the name of the author. The first ring should include the names of your characters. The second ring should contain three character traits for each character. The third ring should contain three quotes (including page numbers) or paraphrases. Each quote or paraphrase should support one of the traits you have identified. The fourth ring should include a theme statement. Outside of the rings, you must create a symbol for each character.

Monday, December 6th, 2010
Friday, December 3rd, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will finish watching and discussing the video on McCarthyism.
  • We will talk about Puritanism. 
  • I will introduce the reading journal criteria. (Handout)
Thursday, December 2nd, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will finish our discussion on intolerance/persecution.
  • We will begin to watch a video explaining McCarthyism: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1Z5aYU6x0o&feature=related
  • The students will be asked, in the writer's notebooks, to jot down five things that surprised them, or that they found interesting, or that they had questions about.
Wednesday, December 1st, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will review characterization. (Prose Notes)
  • As an introduction to our study of the play The Crucible by Arthur Miller, we will discuss intolerance/persecution.
  • If there is time, we will continue with "sixty seconds".
Tuesday, November 30th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We did not finish our poetry presentations yesterday, but we will today.
  • We will share our responses to "Summer in the Yakima Valley".
  • We will continue with "sixty seconds".
Monday, November 29th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will finish our poetry presentations.
  • We will read and analyze the poem "Summer in the Yakima Valley" by Ruth Roach Pierson. We will be looking at contrast.
Friday, November 26th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will continue with our poetry presentations.
  • We will continue with our notes on poetic forms. (Poetry)
  • We will discuss the literary analysis paragraphs for "Girl at a Crossroads".
Wednesday, November 24th, 2010
  • We will review free verse and blank verse. (Poetry)
  • In their journals, students will respond to the poem "Girl at a Crossroads" (handout)
  • If there is time, we will continue with our poetry presentations.
Tuesday, November 23rd, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will read "My Body Is My Own Business" by Naheed Mustafa (p.149: The Act of Writing
  • Again, students will be asked to consider irony.
  • If there is time, we will continue with our poetry presentations.
Monday, November 22nd, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will review colon rules. (Grammar)
  • Students will be asked to create three sentences in their journals: two using semi-colons and one using a colon.
  • We will share our sentences.
  • If there is time, we will continue with our poetry presentations.
Friday, November 19th, 2010
Poetry project are due.
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will review irony. (Prose Notes)
  • Students will read "Thanks For Not Killing My Son" (Act of Writing)
  • We will discuss the irony in the piece.
  • We will begin our poetry presentations.
Thursday, November 18th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will be reviewing our self-assessments and working on goal setting.
  • There will be time to work on the poetry projects, and perhaps some time for "Sixty Seconds".
Wednesday, November 17th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will review semi-colon rules.
  • Students will have some time to work on their poetry projects.
Tuesday, November 16th, 2010
  • We will discuss "Capping the GreatCup Debate".
  • We will review irony. (Prose Notes)
  • We will read "Thanks For Not Killing My Son" (p.342: The Act of Writing)
  • Students will complete an organizer.
  • We will discuss the techniques used in the letter.
Monday, November 15th, 2010
Expository paragraphs are due.
  • We will be discussing argumentation and persuasion. (handout)
  • Students will read "Capping the Great Cup Debate" by Martin Hocking (pp. 316-319: The Act of Writing)
  • During their reading, students will be asked to track the methods being used by the writer. Is the essay primarily argumentative or persuasive? (Most essays use a combination of the two forms, but they also tend to lean more in one way than another.) What is the evidence the student can offer to support their opinions on this topic? I will provide an organizer to help with this task.
  • There should be time for a little more "Sixty Seconds". 
Friday, November 12th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Students will respond to an article in their writing notebooks.
  • We will discuss how to present to an audience and practice, using "Sixty Seconds". 
Wednesday, November 10th, 2010
  • Students will be attending the Remembrance Day assembly. If there is time left over, they will work on their expository paragraphs.
Tuesday, November 9th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading. 
  • We will review how to write an expository paragraph.
  • Students will have time to brainstorm their own paragraph topics. Expository paragraphs will be due on Monday, November 15th.
Monday, November 8th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Students will have time to plan how they will present their poems. This project is due Friday, November 19th. 
Friday, November 5th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Students will have time to look for poems and sort and list images. This must be done for Monday.
Thursday, November 4th, 2010
  • Mini-lesson: metonymy, synecdoche, and hyperbole (Poetry Notes)
  • We will begin to work on our poetry project. (Handout) The first step is to find a poem that is rich in imagery and to sort and list lines from the poem based on the senses they stimulate (sight, smell, taste, touch or sound). 
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010
  • Mini-lesson: oxymoron and paradox (Poetry Notes)
  • Students will work on their literary essays, due tomorrow.
Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010
  • Students will work on their literary essays.
Monday, November 1st, 2010
Literary essays will be due on Thursday, November 4th.
 
Friday, October 29th, 2010
  • Students will work on their literary essays.
I will be collecting notebooks. They should contain the literary analysis paragraph for "The Large Ant", the reflection on the TED talk, the three poems with notes, and the draft of the literary essay.

Thursdays, October 28th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Students will be working on their literary essays.
Wednesday, October 27th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Our mini-lesson will focus on shifts in mood and tone, rhyme and rhyme scheme, and allusion. (Poetry Notes)
  • Students will read "The Sturgeon". They'll discuss it and "Out, Out" in preparation for tomorrow when they will begin their essays.
Tuesday, October 26th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Our mini-lesson will focus on alliteration, assonance, consonance, onomatopoeia, euphony and cacophony (dissonance) (Poetry Notes)
  • Students will work in discussion groups to explore "Circular Saws". We will then read "Out, Out" by Robert Frost.
Monday, October 25th, 2010      
It's Reading Week! 
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will watch the following TED Talk: http://www.ted.com/talks/sir_ken_robinson_bring_on_the_revolution.html
  • In their notebooks, the students will be asked to respond to the TED Talk: sharing thoughts, feelings and questions.
  • Using a literature circles approach, we will read the following three poems. Students will be asked to select the one that they believe best connects to Fast's short story ("The Large Ant") thematically. They all have much in common with the story, so the choice will be based on personal preference. The students should make thorough annotations of the thematic links (perhaps using a Venn diagram), as they will be asked to write a short comparison or contrast essay. This lesson will likely extend into tomorrow's class. 
We read "Circular Saws" today. Students should bring their poems and notes with them tomorrow to use in their literature discussion groups.
 
Narrative essays are due today. Please attach all rough drafts, class criteria, and self-assessment. Remember to include (and highlight) an example of parallelism.

“Circular Saws” by Fred Cogswell

When the circular saw

chewed up my fingernail

I said to myself

"This is a bad dream

and I shall wake up"

but I didn't

and in a few minutes

the pain began


after that, I had

a scar to remind me

not to go near

circular saws


But I soon found

they had ways of disguising themselves

so that watch as I might

they were always

hurting me


now inside and out

I am covered with scars

but that is not

the worst I've learned

the worst thing is

that under the masks

I wear and without

intending to be

I am a circular saw

 


“Out, Out” by Robert Frost

The buzz-saw snarled and rattled in the yard

And made dust and dropped stove-length sticks of wood,

Sweet-scented stuff when the breeze drew across it.

And from there those that lifted eyes could count

Five mountain ranges one behind the other

Under the sunset far into Vermont.

And the saw snarled and rattled, snarled and rattled,

As it ran light, or had to bear a load.

And nothing happened: day was all but done.

Call it a day, I wish they might have said

To please the boy by giving him the half hour

That a boy counts so much when saved from work.

His sister stood beside them in her apron

To tell them "Supper." At the word, the saw,

As if to prove saws knew what supper meant,

Leaped out at the boy's hand, or seemed to leap--

He must have given the hand. However it was,

Neither refused the meeting. But the hand!

The boy's first outcry was a rueful laugh,

As he swung toward them holding up the hand

Half in appeal, but half as if to keep

The life from spilling. Then the boy saw all--

Since he was old enough to know, big boy

Doing a man's work, though a child at heart--

He saw all spoiled. "Don't let him cut my hand off--

The doctor, when he comes. Don't let him, sister!"

So. But the hand was gone already.

The doctor put him in the dark of ether.

He lay and puffed his lips out with his breath.

And then--the watcher at his pulse took fright.

No one believed. They listened at his heart.

Little--less--nothing!--and that ended it.

No more to build on there. And they, since they

Were not the one dead, turned to their affairs.

 


“Sturgeon” by Karen Solie

Jackfish and walleye circle like clouds as he strains

the silt floor of his pool, a lost lure in his lip,

Five of Diamonds, River Runt, Lazy Ike,

or a simple spoon, feeding

a slow disease of rust through his body's quiet armour.

Kin to caviar, he's an oily mudfish. Inedible

Indelible. Ancient grunt of sea

in a warm prairie river, prehistory a third eye in his head.

He rests, and time passes as water and sand

through the long throat of him, in a hiss, as thoughts

of food. We take our guilts

to his valley and dump them in,

give him quicksilver to corrode his fins, weed killer,

gas oil mix, wrap him in poison arms.

Our bottom feeder,

sin-eater.


On an afternoon mean as a hook we hauled him

up to his nightmare of us and laughed

at his ugliness, soft sucker mouth opening,

closing on air that must have felt like ground glass,

left him to die with disdain

for what we could not consume.

And when he began to heave and thrash over yards of rock

to the water's edge and, unbelievably in,

we couldn't hold him though we were teenaged

and bigger than everything. Could not contain

the old current he had for a mind, its pull,

and his body a muscle called river, called spawn.


 
Thursday, October 21st, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Our mini-lesson will focus on the comma. (Grammar)
  • We will also begin to discuss comparison/contrast writing. (handout attached)

Because they involve at least two subjects and offer the possibility of doing several things, comparison and contrast pieces pose problems of focus and organization.

FOCUS

First you face the question of whether to deal only with points of likeness or of difference, or to treat both. You must be clear about the focus in your own mind and make it equally clear to the reader.

A second problem of focus concerns the subjects. Will you concentrate upon one subject or treat both as equally important? If, for instance, you are writing about high school and university, you have three possibilities of focus: on high school, on university, or on both. This focus must be made clear to the reader, but without the obviousness of a sentence like the following:

In this essay I shall be chiefly concerned with high school.

Work with a lighter hand. For example, if you wish to concentrate on high school:

In many ways high school is like university.

If upon university:

In many ways university is like high school.

And if upon both:

University and high school are alike in many ways.

ORGANIZATION

A second problem posed by comparison and contrast involves organization. When you compare any two subjects – call them A and B – you must do so with regard to specific points – 1, 2, 3, and so on. You may organize your material in two ways – either:

A.
1.
2.
3.

B.
1.
2.
3.

or:

1.
A.
B.

2.
A.
B.

3.
A.
B.

In an essay about high school and university, you could devote the first half to high school and discuss such specifics as teachers, lessons and homework; and spend the second half on university, treating the same points, preferably in the same order. Or you could organize around the particular similarities or differences. In the first paragraph of the body you would discuss teachers, in high school then in university; in the second, lessons; and in the third, homework.

Neither method of organizing is inherently better. Proceeding by A and B stresses each subject in its totality. Organizing by 1, 2, 3, emphasizes specific likenesses or dissimilarities. But while neither method is absolutely superior, one will probably serve your purpose better on any specific occasion.










































































Wednesday, October 20th, 2010
  • We will complete yesterday's activity.
  • Students will peer edit their narratives.
  • If there is time, we will silent read.
Good copies of narratives are due on Monday, October 25th.

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • I will share another model of a narrative essay.
  • Using the original composition criteria, and working in groups, the students will assess a number of writing samples.
Students must have their completed narratives with them tomorrow - ready for peer conferencing.

Monday, October 18th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Our mini-lesson will focus on parallelism.
  • I will share another model of a narrative essay.
  • Students will have time to work on their own pieces.
Friday, October 15th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • I will return and discuss the literary analysis paragraphs.
  • We will discuss the theme in "The Large Ant". 
  • I will share another model of a narrative essay.
  • The students will have time to work on their pieces.
Mother to Son by Langston Hughes
Well, son, I'll tell you:
Life for me ain't been no crystal stair.
It's had tacks in it,
And splinters,
And boards torn up,
And places with no carpet on the floors
Bare.
But all the time
I'se been a-climbin' on,
And reachin' landin's,
And turnin' corners,
And sometimes goin' in the dark
Where there ain't been no light.
So, boy, don't you turn back.
Don't you set down on the steps.
'Cause you finds it's kinder hard.
Don't you fall now
For I'se still goin', honey,
I'se still climbin',
And life for me ain't been no crystal stair.

In the poem "Mother to Son" a certain image dominates. This image, a staircase, is also an extended metaphor for the speaker's life. The mother says her staircase has had "places with no carpet on the floor/Bare," and areas with "splinters" and "tacks". The reader can take this to mean that her life has had many obstacles and challenges for her to overcome. The speaker also refers to parts of the staircase that are "dark/Where there ain't been no light". This illustrates that at times she has felt alone and hopeless. Despite these hardships, the mother tells her son that she continues to climb, "reachin' landin's/and turnin' corners". The speaker is evidently resilient, adapting to unexpected changes, and she encourages her son to persevere when he finds his own life to be "kinder hard", telling him not to "turn back" or "set down on the steps". The extended metaphor clearly illustrates that life can be far from easy, but you should never give up.      

Thursday, October 14th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will revisit theme.
  • We will read "The Large Ant" (Imprints 12) and students will be asked to write a theme paragraph in their notebooks. The paragraph should include a topic sentence which states the theme, three supporting points (quotes and explanations), and a conclusion. 
Theme: a view about life and how people behave. (Death - Love - Friendship - Courage)

In fiction, the theme is not intended to teach or preach. In fact, it is not presented directly at all. You extract it from the characters, action, and setting that make up the story. In other words, you must figure out the theme yourself.

Finding the Theme

  • Check out the title. Sometimes it tells you a lot about the theme.
  • Notice repeating patterns and symbols. Sometimes these lead you to the theme.
  • What allusions are made throughout the story?
  • What are the details and particulars in the story? What greater meaning may they have?
Wednesday, October 13th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Students will hand in their paragraphs after completing and attaching a self-assessment.
  • Students will have time to work on their narratives. I will share another exemplar.
Tuesday, October 12th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading
  • I will return the draft literary paragraphs and give some final tips. Good copies will be handed in tomorrow.
  • We will continue to work on our narrative essays. I will share an exemplar.
Basic qualities of a narrative essay:
  • A narrative essay recreates an experience through time.
  • A narrative essay can be based on your own experiences, or it can be based on the experiences of someone else.
  • In addition to telling a story, a narrative essay also communicates a main idea or a lesson learned.
First steps for writing a narrative essay:
  • Identify the experience you want to write about.
  • Think about why the experience is significant.
  • Spend a good deal of time drafting your recollections about the details of the experience.
Writing about the experience:
  • Rather than telling your readers what happened, use vivid details and descriptions to actually recreate the experience for your readers.
Friday, October 8th, 2010
  • Students will have some time to work on their literary paragraphs before they submit their drafts.
  • We will begin to work on our narratives (brainstorming). 
  • I have included a list of past provincial exam topics. Students will select one topic to write about.

English 12 Provincial Exams: Original Composition Topics

November 2004        
Self-awareness leads to meaningful change.                
August 2004            
Role models influence our lives.
June 2004                
Certain events change our impressions of life
April 2004                
Experiences shape relationships
Jan 2004                
Our views of the past change as we mature.
November 2003            
The best gifts are the simplest ones.
August 2003                
Memories influence our lives.
June 2003                   
We learn the most from people closest to us.
April 2003                   
Our journey into the future begins in the past.
January 2003              
Certain experiences can mark the beginnings of maturity.
November 2002            
Challenging circumstances lead to positive actions.
August 2002                
Forming meaningful connections may enrich lives.
June 2002                   
People can be influenced by their environment.
April 2002                   
Sometimes people are unable to control the directions their lives take.             
January 2002               
People can create their own reality.
November 2001           
Taking advantage of opportunities can be beneficial.
August 2001                
Each stage of life brings new choices.
June 2001                   
A good life does not have to be complex.
April 2001                   
It is important to have a realistic view of life.
January 2001               
Surprises can make life interesting.
November 2000 
Adapting to new situations in life is essential.
June 2000                   
Being sincere is important.
August 2000                
Taking charge of your own life is worthwhile.
April 2000                   
The pursuit of freedom involves change.
January 2000               
Keeping an open mind allows for growth.
November 1999            
The important things in life endure over time.
August 1999                 
Determination
June 1999                   
Being Unique
January 1999               
Making Commitments   

Thursday, October 7th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will be reading the poem "Anger" by Linda Pastan. (handout)
  • Students will analyze the poem individually and in literature discussion groups.
  • They will work on their second literary paragraph. 
Students will select one of their drafts to submit tomorrow.

Wednesday, October 6th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will be reading the poem "Mother to Son" by Langston Hughes. (handout)
  • Students will analyze the poem individually and in literature discussion groups.
  • They will work on their first literary paragraphs.
Tuesday, October 5th, 2010
  • We began with silent reading.
  • Our mini-lesson focused on language. We discussed formal and informal language; archaic, colloquial, dialect, jargon and slang. (Prose Notes)
  • We practised creating a literary paragraph based on the poem "Sick" by Shel Silverstein.
Monday, October 4th, 2010
  • We began with silent reading.
  • Together, we created the literary analysis paragraph criteria (posted in classroom).
Friday, October 1st, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Our Quick Write will be a WWF and will focus on the following original composition topic:
Role models influence our lives.
  • In groups, the students will discuss the definition of courage shared in "On the Rainy River".
Thursday, September 30th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will discuss the students' definitions of courage before reading "On the Rainy River" (Imprints 12)
  • We will explore the author's view of courage - offering support from the text.
Wednesday, September 29th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • The students will share the conflict(s) they identified in "The Shining Houses". 
  • Using paragraph format, we will write a paragraph about the conflict(s). (For more information on how to write a paragraph: http://lrs.ed.uiuc.edu/students/fwalters/para.html ) You might also want to check out the simpler format and example provided for the English 8 class.
Remember to come to class tomorrow with a definition of courage. 

Tuesday, September 28th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • Our Quick Write will be a circle story.
  • I will hand back and discuss the snapshot pieces.
Friday, September 24th, 2010
  • We will do our silent reading.
  • We will review plot and conflict, and apply this information to "The Shining Houses".  
Thursday, September 23rd, 2010

Snapshots are due. All drafts should be attached as well as the scoring rubric. You will also complete a self evaluation based on the following questions:

Student Self Evaluation

  • Tell me about your process - how did you get from beginning to end in writing this piece?
  • Which mentor texts used in class had the biggest impact on your thinking and writing?
  • What did you learn about snapshot writing that is evident in the piece? Explain using highlighted examples from your work. (In this piece you will show where you used vivid details.)
  • What did you learn from someone else in writing this piece: a student in class, a comment from another reader, something written on a rough draft, mini lessons and so on?
  • Where does this piece still fall short? If you had months ahead of you to work on the piece, what would you go after first?
  • Grade the piece and explain your evaluation. Use the rubric that we have discussed in class in your evaluation.
Wednesday, September 22nd, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will be discussing theme (Prose Notes).
  • We will discuss the theme of the song “Little Boxes” by Malvina Reynolds. 
  • www.kickyoutube.com/watch?v=sN40lATBjFg&feature=related
  • Then you will read “The Shining Houses” p.26 (Imprints 12). You will identify the theme of the short story and compare it to the theme in the song “Little Boxes”. (Writer's Notebook)
Tuesday, September 21st, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • We will discuss shifting tense and punctuating dialogue.
  • You will have time to work on your own pieces.
Remember to bring your Imprints 12 tomorrow.

Monday, September 20th, 2010
  • We will begin with silent reading.
  • I will hand back notebooks and drafts.
  • We will Quick Write: WWF.
  • We will discuss how to identify and fix changes in fragments and comma splices.
  • Students will have time to work on their own pieces.
Friday, September 17th, 2010

Notebooks are due today. I will also be collecting your snapshot drafts.

I will be sharing another student sample today: "Welcoming Walls"
Using our new, portable lab, we will continue to work on our drafts.

Thursday, September 16th, 2010

This semester we will be using the six traits of good writing: 
  • Ideas 
  • Organization
  • Voice
  • Word Choice
  • Sentence Fluency 
  • Conventions.
In our first writing assignment (the snapshot), we will focus on the first two traits.

IDEAS: THE HEART OF IT ALL
  • Discovering a personally important topic
  • Making the message clear and interesting to the reader
  • Staying focused
  • Expanding and clarifying the idea with significant details
  • Tossing out what does not matter (the deadwood)
From Walter Dean Myers' book Slam
When it's late night you hear the sound of car doors and people talking and boom boxes spilling out the latest tunes. When it rains the tires hiss on the street and when there's a real rain with the wind blowing sometimes you can hear it against the tin sign over Billy's bicycle shop. If there's a fight you hear the voices rising and catching each other up. The sound of broken glass can cut through other noises, even if it's just a bottle of wine somebody dropped. And behind all the other sounds there's always the sirens, bringing their bad news from far off and making you hold your breath until they pass so you know it ain't any of your people who's getting arrested or being taken to the hospital. p.2 

ORGANIZATION: SHOWCASING IT
  • Writing a crackerjack lead
  • Staying on the path (not wandering)
  • Showcasing information with a pattern or structure that fits
  • Using transitions to link ideas
  • Pacing the piece, spending time where it matters
  • Wrapping it up with a thoughtful conclusion
  • I will be handing out and reviewing the rubric for marking the snapshots.
  • I will also share a student sample.
  • You will then have some time to work on your pieces and conference with me.
 Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

D Block will do what B Block did yesterday, and B Block will do D Block's activity. The only addition will be that we will review simile and metaphor. (Poetry Notes)

Tuesday, September 14th, 2010

In order to access computer lab time, my two classes will be out of sync for a few days.

D Block:
  • Silent reading
  • English 12 Terms and Devices (handout)
    • review connotation, denotation and repetition
    • image, imagery, narrative, narration and narrator 
  • We will quickly review the snapshot assignment before heading to the library.
B Block:
  • Silent reading
  • English 12 Terms and Devices (handout)
    • review connotation, denotation and repetition
    • image, imagery, narrative, narration and narrator
  • We will read the mentor text "In the Trenches" by Charles Yale Harrison from The Act of Writing - p.119 (textbook available in the classroom)
  • We will respond (in writing in our notebooks) and discuss structure questions 2 and 3, and style question 4.
  • If time permits, the students will be able to work on their snapshot drafts in their notebooks.
Monday, September 13th, 2010

Reminder: Students should now have a "book" for silent reading and a writing notebook (which includes two quick writes).
  • We began with silent reading.
  • We read the mentor text "une petite fille" by Penny Kittle. (handout) 
  • We discussed tone, mood and atmosphere, and how word choice contributes to these. (Prose Notes)
  • We looked at the use of sensory details: part of figurative language.
  • We began our first narrative piece: a writing snapshot. 
A snapshot is a written picture of a moment in time. Unlike a physical photograph, when you write, you're taking a complete sensory picture. You can discuss the smells, textures, sounds, and sensations in addition to the sights. 

More importantly, though, you are able to capture a feeling. All of the details should lead the reader somewhere. The same sun can be an oppressive weight or a comforting embrace. The things you include--and the words you use to describe them---create the tone of the piece.
  • We will be brainstorming for topics and details today. You may find a topic in the quick writes we did last week. The brainstorming should be done in your writing notebooks.
The following link may be helpful to you in finding the right word(s): http://www.windows2universe.org/teacher_resources/sensory_bank.html

Friday, September 10th, 2010
  • We began with silent reading.
  • Students shared their favourite lines from their poems with the class.
  • Our Quick Write topic was "the music in your heart". However, students had the option of continuing to work on their "Where I'm From" poems, or a topic of their own choosing. 
  • We had a chance to share some of our song titles and reasons for inclusion.   

Thursday, September 9th, 2010
  • We started with another booktalk (The Road).
  • We looked at student samples of "Where I'm From" poems.
  • I modeled beginning my own poem.
  • I then asked the students to work on their poems in their notebooks.
  • Working in small groups, we had a chance to share our favourite lines.
  • We picked up our textbook, Imprints 12, from the library.    

Wednesday, September 8th, 2010
  • We went over the course outline. 
  • I gave a booktalk (Oryx and Crake) and asked the students to make sure that they brought something to read to class on Friday. 
  • Don't forget the public library card challenge!
  • We reviewed "How to Read a Poem". (handout) 
  • We read and listened to the poem "Where I'm From" by George Ella Lyon: http://www.georgeellalyon.com/where.html 
  • Students worked through the poem: first individually and then with a partner. We then discussed the poem as a class.


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