Syllabus

HISTORY 109

Latin American History: The Colonial Experience – Encounter, Conquest, Interaction

Fall 2011 - MWF 9:00-9:50; King 337

Steve Volk (steven.volk@oberlin.edu) X58522

Office Hours:    

Mondays 10-11am                                              Tuesdays 1:30-2:30                                         Wednesdays 2:30-3:30 and by appointment 

(Tlaloc - Aztec god of rain, fertility, water: Codex Rios)

 

Course Description and Goals:

This semester's course will concentrate on the pre-Columbian background of the Americas, the conquest period, and the three centuries of Spanish and (to a much more limited extent) Portuguese colonial rule. It is intended to help students achieve a better understanding of historical approaches and historical methodologies, as well as gaining skills in information literacy, writing, image analysis, critical thinking, and the ability to work collaboratively. Among the specific learning goals are the following:

To introduce students to some important chronologies, geographies, terms, and dynamics of pre-Columbian and colonial Spanish (and to a lesser extent) Portuguese and Caribbean America.

To enable students to think critically and imaginatively about a number of conceptual issues through which one can approach the history of this region:

§     Practice, power, encounter, exchange.

§     The basic frameworks of “Hispanic” culture, as well as some organizing principles of various Mesoamerican and Andean cultures.

§     The material frameworks of conquest and colonization, including the organization of labor systems, the nature of material production and           consumption, and the structures of mercantile capitalism.

§     Spanish, Mesoamerican, Andean, and (later) mestizo ideological practices, including religion and spiritual beliefs, and how they are shaped           by patriarchy, hierarchy, community, language, race and ethnicity.

§     The affective experiences which influence individual and community identity and which give rise to ideologies of difference.

§     The functioning of systems of power as seen through the perspectives of Iberian logic and subaltern resistance, including colonial political           organization, structures of colonial power, and an understanding of accommodation, reform, resistance, and rebellion.

To help students understand how historians work, and to become more familiar with the basic parameters of historical approaches, including:

§  How to identify, closely read, and analyze primary sources.

§  How to work with and evaluate useful secondary sources, specifically identifying and evaluating their central arguments.

§  How to work with non-written sources (including images and artifacts).

§  How to craft interpretations in the absence of sources: how to listen for the voice of the voiceless, how to hear silences, how to read "across         the grain."

§  How to put arguments in appropriate historical frameworks.

§  To understand and appreciate ambiguity in historical argument and presentation.

§  To develop a sense of historical empathy: while the "past is a foreign country," it is intimately connected to the present through the work of the     historian. Your task is to understand that the past is not the same as the present, but that the work of historians means that the questions we        now ask of the past will be different than those asked by previous generations, for a variety of reasons.

To help students pose productive questions:

§  All good historical work begins with good questions. Without good questions, there is no serious intellectual engagement.

To further students’ abilities to work collaboratively in shaping and answering questions and in solving problems.

To understand the rich complexity of human lives by appreciating how others have lived, and how humans share a series of common objectives and desires even though these have been mediated by unequal access to material goods and systems of power.

Course Organization:

I have reorganized the course to be more discussion-intensive and interactive, to be what I call a “community of practice” This is grounded in my understanding that co-participation provides the matrix to learning. (OK, read this again…and once more, and think about it.)  To accomplish this objective, you will be required to complete the required readings before each class, as well as some general reading for the week that will cover the basic  historical evidence that you need in order to form historical interpretations. I have also prepared more traditional lectures using PowerPoint slides and an audio track as video lectures which you will be expected to view before the corresponding class discussions. Be forewarned: this is not a class where you can sit quietly in the back of the class listening (or not) to a lecture. Here, you will view the lecture before class in order to share in a community of learning in the few hours we have together each week.

Accessing Course Materials:

You can access the course texts in a variety of ways: (1) Required texts are on sale at the bookstore; can be purchased on-line; and are on reserve at the library. Some are also available through OBIS as electronic texts. (2) All required articles are on Blackboard (not EREs) under “Readings”. (3) Texts can also be obtained through OHIO LINK. (5) Finally, some articles are available in full-text editions via JSTOR, an impressive electronic collection of major history journals. Please let me know if you are having any difficulties accessing any materials. Required podcast/video lectures are all accessed via Blackboard>Video Lectures or by clicking on the appropriate link in the electronic syllabus.

SOURCES ON LATIN AMERICA:

I have compiled a number of internet sources and resources on Latin America at Sources and Resources on Latin America. This resource, unfortunately now with too many broken links, includes a variety of materials from the history of Latin America to organizations and publications of interest to activists working on Latin American issues.

ASSIGNMENTS & GRADING POLICY

You will receive further instructions on each of the assignments outlined here.

First Paper (Sept. 19): Based on your reading of Phillips and Münkler, please discuss the categories which European voyagers in the late 15th and early 16th century would likely have in mind as they were poised on the edge of their explorations of the “New World” and Africa. What aspects of the “Other” would most likely capture their attention? What would be “strange” to these late Medieval Europeans? (3-5 pages).

Second Paper (Oct. 17): Assessing Primary Sources in the Conquest of Mexico. Compare, evaluate and contrast at least three narratives presented in Stuart B. Schwartz, ed., Victors and Vanquished: Spanish and Nahua Views of the Conquest of Mexico (Boston: Bedrord/St. Martin's), 2000.  (3-5 pages).

Third Paper (Nov. 21): The Colonial Dialogue (4-5 pages).

Final Paper (Dec. 17, 4:00 PM): Your final paper will require that you complete a substantial analysis and synthesis of the colonization process using both primary and secondary sources to discuss the (incomplete) process of colonization in Spanish America (7-10 pages).

Assignments are to be turned in on (or before) the due date noted in the syllabus. Late papers turned in without prior permission - you must request an extension before the due date of the paper - will be reduced by one grade-step for each day that the assignment is late. For example, a paper due on Monday, September 19 which is turned in on September 20 will get a "B-" instead of the "B" that it merited; if it is turned in on September 21, it will get a "C+", etc.

Your first three assignments must be turned in by the last day of the Reading Period, December 16, or they won't be counted. I will not grant an "Incomplete" in the course to allow you to finish those assignments. Your final papers are due no later than 4:00 PM on December 17. Any paper turned in after that time will not be read unless you have applied for a formal Incomplete in the course (which requires my signature) or receive an Emergency Incomplete from the Dean of Studies office. No exceptions.

Your final grade will be determined as follows:

First Paper: 20%    Second Paper: 20%    Third Paper: 30%    Final Paper: 30%

Attendance: I take attendance every class as a way of getting to know your names, but there is no “participation” grade for this course. This is your education, and if you miss classes, you won’t learn as much (did I mention co-participation??). On the other hand, since group work is so important for the class, I will take into account excessive absence from the class when determining your final grade.

Plagiarism and the Honor Code: "The word plagiarism derives from Latin roots: plagiarius, an abductor, and plagiare, to steal. The expropriation of another author’s work, and the presentation of it as one’s own, constitutes plagiarism and is a serious violation of the ethics of scholarship." [American Historical Association, Statement on Standards of Professional Conduct]. Copying the work of others goes against everything that a liberal education is about. It is a serious affront to the other students in the course, to me as a member of the course, and to the plagiarizer him/herself. The college requires that students sign an “Honor Code” for all assignments. This pledge states that “I affirm that I have adhered to the Honor Code in this assignment.” For further information, see the student Honor Code which you can access via Blackboard>Honor System (see link in the sidebar on the left column). If you have questions about what constitutes plagiarism, particularly in the context of joint or collaborative projects, please see me or raise it in class.

Students with Disabilities:

Appropriate accommodations will always be granted to students with documented disabilities. Any questions about the necessary process of documenting disabilities should be addressed to Jane Boomer, Coordinator of Services for Students with Disabilities (Peters G27-28; x5588). If you have a documented disability, please see me early in the semester.

Research help:

If you need help finding information or conducting library research, you may wish to schedule an appointment with a reference librarian.  Librarians can help you plan a research strategy, search databases effectively, and locate books, articles, quality web sites, data, and other resources for any type of research project.  Fill out the form on the library’s web site to get started.  Drop-in research assistance is also available in all campus libraries.

Mictlantecuhtli, c.1480, Aztec. Fired clay, stucco and paint, 176 x 80 x 50 cm.                                                                                                                  Museo del Templo Mayor, Mexico City, CONACULTA-INAH. Photo Michel Zabe

FINAL NOTE: If you are having problems with the readings, the lectures, or just want to discuss further any aspect of the course (from content to class dynamics), I strongly encourage you to see me during office hours or to make an appointment. Please don’t wait until late in the semester to express these concerns.

BOOKS RECOMMENDED FOR PURCHASE: 

Mark A. Burkholder & Lyman Johnson, Colonial Latin America, 6th ed. (New York: Oxford), 2008.

Stuart B. Schwartz, Victors and Vanquished: Spanish and Nahua Views of the Conquest of Mexico(Boston: Bedford/St. Martins), 2000.

Ward Stavig, The World of Túpac Amaru: Conflict, Community, and Identity in Colonial Peru (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press), 1999.

Irene Silverblatt, Modern Inquisitions. Peru and the Colonial Origins of the Civilized World (Durham: Duke), 2004. [NOTE: This text is available in an electronic edition as an ACLS Humanities E-Book. Click on the link.]


SYLLABUS

Sept 7, 9, 12: The European Imagination


Podcast viewing
for week: Europe on the Edge of Exploration and Conquest (40:53 min.)

Sept. 7: Introduction

Sept 9, 12: Imagining a World Without the Western Hemisphere

Mark A. Burkholder & Lyman L. Johnson, Colonial Latin America, 6th ed. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008) [Hereafter CLA]: pp. 23-32 [6th ed.], 23-33 [7th ed.] [NOTE: Page numbers in this book are based on the 6th and 7th editions; if you have a different edition, please find the logically appropriate set of pages or chapters.]  

World Map: Donnus Nicolaus Germanus, Cosmographia, Claudius Ptolemaeus Ulm, 1482.

Sept 9: Where Are We? Maps and Location

Seymour Phillips, "The Outer World of the European Middle Ages," in Stuart B. Schwartz, ed., Implicit Understandings (NY and Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1994), pp. 23-42.

Sept 12: The Strangeness of Other People

                Phillips, “The Outer World,” pp. 42-63.

Marina Münkler, “Experiencing Strangeness: Monstrous Peoples on the Edge of the Earth as Depicted on Medieval Mappae Mundi,” The Medieval History Journal Vol. 5:2 (2002): 195-222. [Blackboard and on line. Click on “Full Text PDF” in right-hand column]

 

Sept. 14, 16: Imagining a World without Europe. The Spiritual and Material Worlds of Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica

Reading for week:  CLA: pp. 1-18 [6th ed]; 1-19 [7th ed.].

Podcast viewing for week: Lecture 2: "New World Pops." (15 min.), Lecture 3: "Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica" (31 min.), Lecture 4: "The Mexica (Aztecs): 1325-1519" (24 min.)

          Sept. 14: Texts: Reading Subaltern History

Jorge Luis Borges, "Averroes' Search," in The Aleph, Including the Prose Fictions from The Maker , Andrew Hurley, trans. (New York:  Penguin Books, 2004), pp. 69-78.

Gordon Brotherston, “Popol vuh,” in Book of the Fourth World: Reading the Native Americas through their Literature (NY: Cambridge University Press, 1992), pp. 215-237. [NOTE: A digital photographic copy of the oldest surviving transcription of the Popol vuh, dating from c.1701 by Francisco Ximénez, O.P., and held at the Newberry Library in Chicago, can be found on line via Ohio State University library system. It presents the manuscript in three different versions: K'iche', Spanish, and English.)

Selections from Gordon Brotherston, Image of the New World (London: Thames and Hudson), 1979.

I.1. Annals of the valley of Mexico before and during the Spanish conquest  (1516-25), pp. 28-32.

III. 14. Maya worship of maize, pp. 118-19.

V.1. The present and past ages of the world, pp. 153-55.

V. 2. Quetzalcoatl burns himself and becomes Venus, pp. 155-56.

V. 3. Quetzalcoatl brings bones from Dead Land and makes man, pp. 157-59.

V. 4. Quetzalcoatl appears as Venus and lifts up the sky,” pp. 159-62.

Sept. 16: Understanding Distant Cultures

Inga Clendinnen, "The Costs of Courage in Aztec Society," Past & Present, no. 107 (May 1985): 44-89. [Blackboard and on-line at JSTOR].

OPTIONAL: Jeffrey M. Pilcher, “The People of Corn: Native American Cuisine,” in ¡Que Vivan los Tamales! Food and the Making of Mexican Identity! (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1998), pp. 7-24.

FIRST PAPER (“STRANGENESS”) DUE AT START OF CLASS, SEPT. 19

Sept. 19, 21, 23: Imagining a World without Europe. The Material World of the Pre-Columbian Andes

Reading for week: CLA: pp. 18-23 [6th ed]; 19-23 [7th ed.].

Podcast viewing for the week: Lecture 5 (Environment & Society in the Andes, 28:43); and Lecture 6 (The Rise of the Incas, 41:30 min.)

Sept. 19: Background, Texts, Reading Subaltern Identity

Gordon Brotherston, “Tahuantinsuyu,” Book of the Fourth World. Reading the Native Americans Through Their Literature (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1992), pp. 193-211.

Ward Stavig, The World of Túpac Amaru: Conflict, Community, and Identity in Colonial Peru (Lincoln, NB: University of Nebraska Press, 1999), Introduction and Ch. 1 (xiii-xxxiv, 1-23).

Selections from Gordon Brotherston, Image of the New World (London: Thames and Hudson), 1979.

V. 8. Solar eclipse and domesticity in the second world age, pp. 170-71.

V. 9. The cave-mouths at ‘Dawn Inn,’, whence the Inca emerged, pp. 172-73.

Selections from Benjamín Keen, Latin American Civilization. History and Society, 1492 to the Present, 4th ed. rev. (Boulder: Westview), 2000.

Bernabé Cobo, ”How the Inca Formed a Nation,” Historia del Nuevo Mundo (Seville: 1800-1893): pp. 19-21.

Sept 21: The Material Landscape of Pre-Columbian America

Arnold J. Bauer, “The Material Landscape of Pre-Columbian America,” in Goods, Power, History: Latin America’s Material Culture (NY: Cambridge, 2001), pp. 15-45.

Sept. 23: Environment and History

Garcilaso de la Vega, el Inca, Royal Commentaries of the Incas and General History of Peru, trans. Harold V. Livermore (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1966), Part I, Book 5, Chapter I-XVI (pp. 241-276).

Sept. 26, 28, 30: The Early Encounter

Reading for week: CLA: pp. 40-47 [6th ed.], 41-49 [7th ed.].

Podcast viewing for the week: Lecture 7: Columbus Heads West (19 min, 20 sec)Lecture 8: Hello Columbus! (29 min.)

Sept 26: Why Spain/Portugal? What Were They Looking For?

Overview lecture and questions

Sept 28 and 30: Reading Columbus

The Journal of Christopher Columbus (During His First Voyage, 1492-93), and Documents Relating to the Voyages of John  Cabot and Gaspar Corte Real, trans. With notes and introduction by Clements R. Markham (London: Hakluyt Society), 1893.  Read only the following dates (unless you want to read the entire journal): Oct. 11-17 (p. 35-51); Oct 24-30 (p.57-63); Nov. 3-12 (67-76); Nov. 25-27 (p. 85-91); Dec. 16 (p. 111-114); Dec. 21 (p. 122-126); Dec. 26 (p. 135-39).[Blackboard and on-line].

Margarita Zamora, “Christopher Columbus’s ‘Letter to the Sovereigns’: Announcing the Discovery,” in Stephen Greenblatt, ed., New World Encounters (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993), pp. 1-11.

Palacios Rubios, "The Requirement" (Requerimiento)

Spanish version

English translation in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Requerimiento

“The Laughter of Doctor Palacios Rubios,” Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo y Valdés, Historia general y natural de las Indias, selection from Benjamín Keen, Latin American Civilization. History and Society, 1492 to the Present, 4th ed. rev. (Boulder: Westview, 2000), pp. 64-65.

Christopher  Columbus by Sebastiano de Piombo, 1519 (posthumous)

  
  







Oct. 3, 5, 7: The Conquest – Nahua Perspectives

Reading for week: CLA: Chapter 2 (The Age of Conquest).

Podcast Viewing for the week: Lecture 9: By What Right? (24:51); and Lecture 10: Cortes and the Conquest of Mexico (25:53)

Oct. 3, 5: Omens and Early Encounters

Stuart B. Schwartz, Victors and Vanquished: Spanish and Nahua Views of the Conquest of Mexico (Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2000), 29-126.

Oct. 7: Tenochtitlan to the Noche Triste

In class screening of the "La Otra Conquista" (The Other Conquest), David Carrasco, dir. (2000), first half.

Stuart B. Schwartz, Victors and Vanquished: Spanish and Nahua Views of the Conquest of Mexico (Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2000), 127-181.



(Conquest of Mexico: Lienzo de Tlaxcala)


Oct. 10, 12, 14: Colonial Bodies

Reading for week: CLA: Chapter 3 (Ruling New World Empires).

Podcase Viewing for the week: Lecture 11: Columbian Exchange (1): Disease (25:03); and Lecture 12: Columbian Exchange (2): Animals & Plants (13:56)

    

Oct. 10: Disease

Suzanne Austin Alchon, "New World Epidemics and European Colonialism," in A Pest in the Land: New World Epidemics in a Global Perspective (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2003), pp. 109-145. Skim the "Appendix: The Demographic Debate," 147-177.

 Oct. 12: Food

Arnold J. Bauer, “Contact Goods,” in Goods, Power, History: Latin America’s Material Culture (NY: Cambridge, 2001), pp. 46-84.

Rebecca Earle, "'If You Eat Their Food...':  Diets and Bodies in Early Colonial Spanish America," The American Historical Review 115: 3 (June 2010): 688-713.

Oct. 14: Sex

Regina Harrison, “The Theology of Concupiscence: Spanish-Quechua confessional Manuals in the Andes,” in Francisco Javier Cevallos-Candau, Jeffrey A. Cole, Nina M. Scott, and Nicomedes Suárez-Araúz, eds., Coded Encounters: Writing, gender, and Ethnicity in Colonial Latin America (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1994), pp.135-150.


SECOND PAPER (ASSESSING PRIMARY SOURCES: THE CONQUEST OF MEXICO) DUE AT START OF CLASS, OCT. 17

Oct. 17, 19, 21: Colonial Minds – Religion

Podcast Viewing for the week: Lecture 13: Spanish Interests in the New World (18:18); Lecture 14: Hapsburg Rule in Spain (11:28 min); Lecture 15: The Church, The Devil, and Evangelization in the Early Colony (31:01).

          Oct. 17: Evangelization

From Kenneth Mills, William B. Taylor and Sandra Lauderdale Graham, eds., Colonial Latin America: A Documentary History (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 2002):

8. Orders Given to ‘the Twelve’ (1523), pp. 59-64;

3. The Lords and Holy Men of Tenochtitlan Reply to the Franciscans, 1524 (1564), pp. 19-22.

9. Francisco de Vitoria, ‘On the Evangelization of Unbelievers,’ Salamanca, Spain (1534-35), pp. 65-77;

13. The Jesuit and the Bishop, Bahia, Brazil (1552-53), pp. 93-103;

14. Fray Pedro de Gante’s Letter de Charles V, Mexico City (1552), pp. 104-112.

Oct. 19: Sympathy for the Devil. Syncretism and the "Problem" of Evangelization in the New World.

Sabine MacCormack, "The Mind of the Missionary: José de Acosta on Accommodation and Extirpation, Circa 1590,” in Religion in the Andes: Vision and Imagination in Early Colonial Peru (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1991), pp. 249-280.

Bartolomé de las Casas, “The Strange Sermon of Father Montesinos,” Historia de las Indias (Mexico: 1951), in Benjamín Keen, Latin American Civilization. History and Society, 1492 to the Present, 4th ed. rev. (Boulder: Westview, 2000), pp. 62-64.

Oct. 21: Discipline

In class: Screening of the second half of "La Otra Conquista" (The Other Conquest)

Inga Clendinnen, "Disciplining the Indians: Franciscan Ideology and Missionary Violence in Sixteenth-Century Yucatán," Past and Present, no. 94 (February 1982): 27-48. [Blackboard and on-line at JSTOR.]

Oct. 24-30: FALL BREAK 

 

Oct. 31, Nov. 2, 4: Struggle and Daily Existence of Colonial Subjects

Podcast Viewing for the week: Lecture 16: How Spanish Rule Reaches the People: Obedezco pero no Cumplo (26:55); Lecture 17: Landed Systems in Colonial Spanish America (23:04)

Oct. 31: Establishing Colonial Rule

Ward Stavig, The World of Túpac Amaru: Conflict, Community, and Identity in Colonial Peru (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1999), Introduction and Chs. 1 (pp. xiii-xxxiv, 1-23).

Lucas Alamán, “The Structure of Colonial Government” (1849-52), in Benjamín Keen, Latin American Civilization. History and Society, 1492 to the Present, 4th ed. rev. (Boulder: Westview, 2000), pp. 94-99.

Nov. 2: Struggles over Land and its Production

        Stavig, The World of Túpac Amaru, Chs. 4-5 (84-128).

Nov. 4: Environment and Colonialism

Stavig, The World of Túpac Amaru, Chs. 6 (129-161).

From Kenneth Mills, William B. Taylor and Sandra Lauderdale Graham, eds., Colonial Latin America: A Documentary History (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 2002):

The Evils of Cochineal, Tlaxcala, Mexico (1553), pp. 113-116.

From Richard Boyer and Geoffrey Spurling, eds., Colonial Lives: Documents on Latin American History, 1550-1850 (NY: Oxford University Press, 2000):

Karen Vieira Powers, “Land Concentration and Environmental Degradation: Town Council Records on Deforestation in Uyumbicho (Quito, 1553-96),” pp. 11-17.

Nov. 7, 9, 11: Labor and Community

Reading for week: CLA: Chapter 4 (Population and Labor) & 5 (Production, Exchange & Defense).

Podcast viewing for the week: Lecture 18: Labor Systems - The Encomienda (27:39); Lecture 19: Labor Systems - The M'ita (32:25)

Nov. 7: The Market Economy

Brooke Larson, “The Emergence of a Market Economy,” in Cochabamba, 1550-1900: Colonialism and Agrarian Transformation in Bolivia, expanded ed. (Durham: Duke University Press, 1998), pp. 51-91.  

Nov. 9: The Mining Mita

Marquis of Varinas, “The Corregidor: Enemy of the People,” in Benjamín Keen, Latin American Civilization. History and Society, 1492 to the Present, 4th ed. rev. (Boulder: Westview, 2000), pp. 100-104.

José de Acosta, “The Potosí Mine,” Historia natural y moral de las Indias (1590), in Benjamín Keen, Latin American Civilization. History and Society, 1492 to the Present, 4th ed. rev. (Boulder: Westbiew, 2000), pp. 82-84.

Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala, “The Mine Owners,” in The First New Chronicle and Good Government, abridged ed, David Frye, ed. (Indianapolis/Cambridge: Hackett Publishing Co., 2006), pp. 179-184.

From Ward Stavig and Ella Schmidt, eds., The Tupac Amaru and Catarista Rebellions: An Anthology of Sources (Indianapolis/Cambridge: Hackett Publishing Co., 2008):

No. 15. Tupac Amaru Protests the Mita to the Audiencia of Lima (pp. 20-24).

No. 16: Three Documents Related to the Potosí Mita (pp. 24-28).

No. 17: A Communal Strategy to Maintain Compliance with the Mita and Other Demands (pp. 28-30).

RECOMMENDED: Stavig, The World of Túpac Amaru, Chs. 7 (162-207).

Nov. 11: Coca, Work, and Community

Catherine J. Allen, "Coca and Cultural Identity in Andean Communities," in Deborah Pacini and Christine Franquemont, eds., Coca and Cocaine. Effects on People and Policy in Latin America (Peterborough, NH: Cultural Survival and LASP, 1986), pp. 35-48.

W. Golden Mortimer, “The History of Coca,” in William O. Walker III, Drugs in the Western Hemisphere: An Odyssey of Cultures in Conflict (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1996), pp. 2-8.

Joseph A. Gagliano, “The Coca Debate in Colonial Peru,” in Walker, Drugs in the Western Hemisphere, pp. 8-22.

Nov. 14, 16: State and Society in the Spanish Colonies (NOTE: No class Nov. 18)

Reading for week:  CLA: Chapters 6 (The Social Economy) & 7 (The Family & Society).

Podcast Viewing for the week: Lecture 20: Colonial Dialogues (21:43); Lecture 21: New World Slavery (24:23)

Nov. 14: An Early 17th Century Snapshot: Guaman Poma de Ayala

Selections from Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala, The First New Chronicle and Good Government, abridged ed., David Frye, ed. (Indianapolis/Cambridge: Hackett Publishing Co., 2006), pp. 186-203; 225-227; 231-239; 263-287.

Nov. 16: “Race Thinking” and Colonial Identity

Irene Silverblatt, Modern Inquisitions. Peru and the Colonial Origins of the Civilized World (Durham: Duke, 2004), Prologue (pp. 3-27).

Nov. 18: NO CLASS – continue with the Silverblatt reading on your own

Silverblatt, Modern Inquisitions, Chs. 1-3 (pp. 29-97).

THIRD PAPER  (THE COLONIAL DIALOGUE) DUE NOV. 21, AT START OF CLASS

Nov. 21, 23: Race & Identity       

 Podcast Viewing for the week: Lecture 22: Colonial Dialogues - Resistance (29: 44)

Nov. 21: Magical Race Thinking: Making Spaniards

Silverblatt, Modern Inquisitions, Chs. 4-6 (pp. 101-160).

Nov. 23: Becoming Indian

Silverblatt, Modern Inquisitions, Chs. 7-8, Afterword (pp. 163-227).

Nov. 25: Thanksgiving Break

Nov. 28, 30, Dec. 2: Gender and the Spanish American World

       Podcast Viewing for the week: Lecture 23: The Construction of Hispanic Patriarchy (41:05)

Nov. 28: Lo Femenino/Lo Domestico

Asunción Lavrin, "Lo Feminino: Women in Colonial Historical Sources," in Coded Encounters, pp. 153-176. [Blackboard and regular reserve].

Nov. 30: Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz

Thomas A. Abercrombie, "Affairs of the Courtroom: Fernando de Medina Confesses to Killing His Wife (Charcas, 1595)," in Boyer and Spurling, eds., Colonial Lives, Chapter 6: pp. 54-75.

Nancy van Deusen, "Wife of My Soul and Heart, and all My Solace: Annulment Suit Between Diego Andres de Arenas and Ysabel Allay Suyo (Huanuco, Peru, 1618)," in Boyer and Spurling, eds., Colonial Lives, Chapter 10: pp. 130-140. 

Dec. 2: Putting it Together: Casta Paintings

No readings.


(De español e india, produce mestizo)

Dec. 5, 7, 9: The Late Colony. Challenges and Rebellions.

Reading for week: CLA: Chapter 9 (Imperial Expansion).

Podcast Viewing for the week: Lecture 24: Bourbon Era Readjustments: Economic Realignment (23:08); Lecture 25: Bourbon Reforms: New Administrative Approaches (44:09)

Dec. 5: Urban Rioting

R. Douglas Cope, “The Riot of 1692,” in The Limits of Racial Domination: Plebeian Society in Colonial Mexico City, 1660-1720 (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1994), pp. 125-160.

Dec. 7: Rebellion in Mexican Villages

William B. Taylor, “Rebellion,” in Drinking, Homicide and Rebellion in Colonial Mexican Villages (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1979), pp. 113-150.

Dec. 9: Andean Rebellions: Túpac Amaru

From Kenneth Mills, William B. Taylor and Sandra Lauderdale Graham, eds., Colonial Latin America: A Documentary History (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 2002): “ ‘As for the Spaniards, their time is up,’ Jauja, Peru (1742, 1752),” 299-308.

Stavig, The World of Túpac Amaru, Chs. 8-9 (pp. 207-262).

Dec. 12: The Coming of Independence

Podcast Viewing for the week: Lecture 26: Great Rebellions of the Andes (Juan Santos Atahualpa and Tupac Amaru II) (25:42)

Dec. 12: Displacing Discontent: Criollos and Independence

CLA: Chapter 10 (Crisis & Political Revolution).

From Benjamín Keen, Latin American Civilization. History and Society, 1492 to the Present, 4th ed. rev. (Boulder: Westview), 2000:

Lucas Alamán, “The Cleavage Within,” Historia de Méjico (1949-52), pp. 200-203.

Simón Bolívar, “The Vision of Bolívar,” The Selected Writings of Bolívar (1951), pp. 222-23.

“The Plan of Iguala,” from Lorenzo de Zavala, Ensayo histórico de los revoluciones de México (1918), pp. 226-233.

Reading period, Dec. 14-16

FINAL PAPER (The Process of Colonization) DUE NO LATER THAN SATURDAY, DECEMBER 17 AT 4:00 PM.


(Meeting between Simón Bolívar and José de San Martín in Guayaquil, Ecuador, 1822)



 

 

 

ĉ
Steven Volk,
Nov 1, 2011, 5:59 PM
Comments