Page authors

  • Alexander Hanhart
    November 15, 2011
Home‎ > ‎

Assignments

Because one of the course goals is fluency in mathematical expression, there will also be problems to write up on paper each week and turn in. These problems will require more than just procedure, might connect two or more things together, and will more closely resemble the harder exam problems. They will normally also require written explanations in English sentences for full credit.

Written assignments will be posted to this page once they are prepared.

Grading of Written Homework

One of the goals of this course is for you to learn how to think and communicate mathematically. This means that your homework problems should be written up with justification and explanations of your steps in English. See the examples in the textbook for examples of how to write up solutions to a problem well.

Some exam problems will also ask for justifications, so this will be good practice.

Each problem will usually be worth 3 points. Graders will grade each three-point part according to the following rubric:

Points Description of Work
4
Work is completely accurate and essentially perfect. Work is thoroughly developed, neat, and easy to read. Complete sentences are used.
3
Work is good, but incompletely developed, hard to read, unexplained, or jumbled. Work contains “right idea” but is flawed.
 2Answers which are not explained at all, even if correct, will generally receive 2 points.
1 Work is sketchy. There is some correct work, but most of work is incorrect.
0 Work minimal or non-existent. Solution is completely incorrect.

If you have a question about how a problem is scored, please check the rubric above to see which line best describes your work.  If you are still unsure, contact your instructor.  The instructor may confer with the grader about the score.

Exceptions

Your lowest homework score will be dropped when computing your average for the final grade. This means you can take a "free spin" for any reason you want, be it time to spend on another class, a family emergency, or an unusually packed social calendar. In fairness to the graders and other students, late homeworks will not be accepted.

Č
Ċ
ď
1_1.pdf
(23k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Sep 13, 2011, 12:41 PM
Ċ
ď
1_2.pdf
(33k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Sep 13, 2011, 12:41 PM
Ċ
ď
1_3.pdf
(27k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Sep 13, 2011, 12:41 PM
Ċ
ď
1_4.pdf
(36k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Sep 13, 2011, 12:41 PM
Ċ
ď
1_5.pdf
(34k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Sep 13, 2011, 12:41 PM
Ċ
ď
1_6.pdf
(14k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Sep 20, 2011, 10:42 AM
Ċ
ď
2_1.pdf
(20k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Sep 20, 2011, 10:43 AM
Ċ
ď
2_2.pdf
(28k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Sep 20, 2011, 10:43 AM
Ċ
ď
2_3.pdf
(22k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Sep 27, 2011, 9:22 AM
Ċ
ď
2_4.pdf
(26k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Sep 27, 2011, 9:22 AM
Ċ
ď
2_5.pdf
(14k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Sep 27, 2011, 9:22 AM
Ċ
ď
2_6.pdf
(23k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Oct 4, 2011, 1:20 PM
Ċ
ď
2_8.pdf
(38k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Oct 4, 2011, 1:20 PM
Ċ
ď
3_1.pdf
(21k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Oct 18, 2011, 3:47 PM
Ċ
ď
3_2.pdf
(35k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Oct 18, 2011, 3:47 PM
Ċ
ď
3_3.pdf
(19k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Oct 18, 2011, 3:47 PM
Ċ
ď
3_4.pdf
(39k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Oct 24, 2011, 5:13 PM
Ċ
ď
3_5.pdf
(27k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Oct 24, 2011, 5:13 PM
Ċ
ď
3_7.pdf
(32k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Nov 1, 2011, 2:27 PM
Ċ
ď
4_1.pdf
(21k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Nov 1, 2011, 2:27 PM
Ċ
ď
4_2.pdf
(22k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Nov 4, 2011, 12:36 PM
Ċ
ď
4_3.pdf
(23k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Nov 4, 2011, 12:36 PM
Ċ
ď
4_4.pdf
(14k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Nov 15, 2011, 9:13 AM
Ċ
ď
4_5.pdf
(31k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Nov 15, 2011, 9:13 AM
Ċ
ď
4_7.pdf
(21k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Nov 29, 2011, 8:05 AM
Ċ
ď
5_1.pdf
(14k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Nov 29, 2011, 8:05 AM
Ċ
ď
5_2.pdf
(31k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Nov 29, 2011, 8:05 AM
Ċ
ď
5_3.pdf
(39k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Dec 6, 2011, 8:22 AM
Ċ
ď
5_4.pdf
(31k)
Alexander Hanhart,
Dec 6, 2011, 8:22 AM
Comments