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US History Unit 1


 Date Objective Activities Homework
 8/25 Students will review the course expectations. Students will describe the interactions among Native Americans, Europeans and Africans in Colonial America by utilizing one of the big 11 social studies skills.
  1. Review Class Expectations
  2. Introduction: Entry #1Students will be broken up into groups of 4-6 and given 4 questions to which they will consider and respond. Students will then share their answers with the class. Students will write their final responses on a sheet of paper provided by the teacher.
  3. Unit 1.1 Notes.
  4. Discussion to support major themes
  5. Closure
Get a single-subject college rule composition book for class and begin bringing it every day.
 8/28 Students will describe the interactions among Native Americans, Europeans and Africans in Colonial America by utilizing one of the big 11 social studies skills.
  1. Review Class Expectations
  2. Introduction: Entry 2: Write a half page journal entry from the view of a member of the Taino people that describes what the Taino people saw when Columbus and his crew first arrived on their island. Identify your thoughts about the European explorers and your concerns.
  3. Complete any 1.1 Notes from the previous class: Unit 1.1 Notes.
  4. Columbus Review Video: Brief Video
  5. Primary Source Reads: Students will read documents providing information about Christopher Columbus' account of his travels and discuss what the text identifies; students will learn about Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain to gain an increased understanding of Spain's religious influences behind their drive to explore the New World: Unit 1 Documents (PDF); Unit 1 Documents (Google)
  6. Closure
 Get a single-subject college rule composition book for class and begin bringing it every day.
 8/31 Students will describe the interactions among Native Americans, Europeans and Africans in Colonial America. Students will identify the challenges the English faced when developing a settlement at Jamestown.
  1. Introduction: Entry 3: How is the presence of another people going to change the expectations of colonists and what obligations do colonists have to natives who already inhabit the land?
  2. Chapter 2 Notes (Sections 1 and 2)
  3. Indentured Servitude reading and writing assignment
  4. Introduction to Jamestown Documents
  5. Closure
 Bring in the Course Expectations by September 10/11.
 9/2 Students will explain how the New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies developed unique cultures in regards to race, class, and gender.
  1. Introduction: Students will watch about 15 minutes of the History Channels "The Story of Us" and describe how the colonies of Jamestown and Plymouth developed differently and identified the reasons for the each colonies development. (3:24-18:15)
  2. Review the differences of British Colonialism and Spanish Colonialism.
  3. "Early Jamestown: Why did So Many Colonists Die?" DBQ: Students will review the documents of this DBQ and complete the included assignments: "Background Essay Questions" and "Understanding the Question and Pre-Bucketing" (Jamestown DBQ and Jamestown DBQ Questions)
  4. Closure
 Complete the DBQ worksheet about "Early Jamestown: Why did So Many Colonists Die?" to turned in next class. Course Expectations are due by next Thursday.
 9/9 Students will assess the contributions of immigrant groups to the development of the United States by reviewing information about the Jamestown colony.
  1. Introduction: Entry 5 (At the end of the session explain why so many of the early colonists in Jamestown died.)
  2. Collect Homework (If students did not complete the assignment the previous class)
  3. Continue with Jamestown DBQ
  4. Jamestown DBQ Essay Outline Process
  5. Review for Chapter 1 Test
  6. Closure
 Study for the Chapter 1 Test: Unit 1.1 Notes

 Complete the Jamestown DBQ
Jamestown DBQ Essay Outline Process if you did not complete it in class.
 9/11 Students will explain how the New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies developed unique cultures in regards to race, class, and gender.
  1. Chapter 1 Test
  2. Introduction, Entry #6: What did Roger Williams mean when he stated the following in a sermon?: "Forced religion stinks in the nostrils of God."
  3. 1.2 Notes: Sections 3 and 4
  4. Closure
 None
 9/15 Students will explain how the New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies developed unique cultures in regards to race, class, and gender.
  1.  Introduction, Entry #7: Why did people risk everything to populate the Thirteen Colonies?
  2. The Thirteen Colonies Assignment: Students will work with a partner to develop an interesting way to display information about the Thirteen Colonies.
 Complete the Thirteen Colonies Assignment.
 9/17 Students will analyze the causes of the Salem Witch Trials by studying the content of the documents in the mini DBQ assignment about The Salem Witch Trials of 1692. The documents will be studied to help students examine the different entities regarding hysteria that caused the Salem Witch Trials.
  1. Introduction: Entry 8: What makes a person lucky or unlucky?
  2. Collaborative Salem Witch Trial Hook assignment: Students will be divided into groups of 4-7 members. At each group table their will be a piece of paper with words, (Angel/ God) (The Soul), (the Devil), (good luck charms & lucky numbers), (Witches). Students will rotate each station and write comments about their beliefs in these. At the end of this exercise, the students will have 3 minutes to review responses.
  3. Students will return to their seats and popcorn read the background essay asked to write a 2 sentence summary on background essay. Salem Witch Trial DBQ
  4. Teacher will ask each group to review a separate document one student will be responsible for writing the responses to the questions and one student will be responsible for reporting those answers with the whole class. Students will be provided paper to record their responses.
  5. Groups will report their findings to the class.
  6. Closure
 None
 9/23 Students will identify how the colonies developed into self-governing units.
  1. Introduction: Entry 10: How can prosperity in the colonies be achieved without exploiting or enslaving others?
  2. Salem Witch Trial DBQ Outline Check
  3. 1.3 Notes Review (Sections 1 and 2)
  4. Chapter 2 Test Review (Study 1.2 Notes)
 Salem Witch Trial DBQ Essay:

Salem Witch Trial DBQ
DBQ Document Notes

A Day: due by 11:59 PM Tuesday, 9/22 through turnitin.com.
B Day: due by 11:59 PM Wednesday, 9/23 through turnitin.com.
*Outlines will be checked in class on Tuesday, 9/22.
 9/25 Students will identify how the colonies prospered into self-governing units.
  1. Introduction: Entry #11: What is freedom?
  2. Chapter 2 Test
  3. 1.3 Notes Continued (Section 2)
  4. Closure
 None
 9/29 Students will identify the causes of the American Revolution by analyzing how the outcomes of the French and Indian War and other events during the 1700s developed dissatisfaction in the colonies. 
  1. Introduction: Entry #12: How did the policy of salutary neglect benefit both England and its colonies?
  2. ​French and Indian War Documentary
  3. 1.3 Notes
  4. Proclamation of 1763
  5. Closure
 None
 10/1 Students will analyze primary documents from the late eighteenth century to assess colonial reaction to Great Britain's tax legislation in the 1760s to identify causes for the American Revolution.
  1. Introduction: Entry 13: Was England justified in its actions to pass laws that essentially provided a means for colonists living in North American to pay for the French and Indian War? Explain
  2. Review the "Virginia Time Line, 1760-1776" with the class
  3. Read "Summary of the 1765 Stamp Act" as a class
  4. Students will review a primary document with other students in a group. The class will be divided into six groups and each group will review one of three documents. Groups reviewing the same document will then combine and share their findings before reporting to the class.
  5. As a class, read and discuss Patrick Henry's "Virginia Stamp Act Resolutions." Students will respond and vote on the resolutions Patrick Henry developed.
  6. Closure
 
 10/5 Students will analyze the changing ideologies of American colonists in response to the actions of Britain
  1. Introduction: Entry 14: Identify the arguments Britain would make to explain why American colonists should obey laws passed in Britain. Also identify the rebuttal of American colonists.
  2. 1.4 Notes
  3. Colonial Response Project
  4. Closure
 Complete the 
Colonial Response Project and turn in next class.
 10/7 Students will analyze the changing ideologies of American colonists in response to the actions of Britain
  1. Introduction: Entry 15: Analyze the Declaration of Independence and identify how the Declaration can be described as a political response to the actions of the British King and British Parliament.
  2. Declaration of Independence Discussion of Grievances: Students will pair up and discuss their response to the Entry. Students will be paired using Hand Up-Stand Up-Pair Up.
  3. American Revolution Documentary: Tea Party to Battle of Saratoga (America: The Story of US)
  4. Closure
 None
 10/9 Students will identify the challenges faced by the Continental Army during the American Revolution. 
  1. Introduction: Entry 16: What effect would the American Revolution have on the American character?
  2. 1.4 Notes
  3. Chapter 3 & 4 Study Guide
  4. Unit 1 Review
  5. Closure
 Chapter 3 & 4 Study Guide Due next class.
 10/13 Students will analyze the major underpinnings of the Articles of Confederation and the US Constitution.
  1. Introduction: Entry 17: How has the American view o the purposes of government changed since the country's founding?
  2. Check Study Guides (Chapter 3 & 4 Study Guide) for credit. (10 Points)
  3. Chapter 3 & 4 Jeopardy Review (Jeopardy Link) - Try it in the speed match mode for a good review at home
  4. Quiz-Quiz-Trade Review
  5. NHD Annotated Bibliography Instruction
  6. Closure
 Study for the Chapter 3 & 4 Test