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SAT Tips

    First of all, what is that SAT and how is it different from the ACT? Well the ACT and SAT are both used for admissions into colleges. They both take between 3-4 hours since the essay is optional for both of them. The ACT is graded on a lower number scale and also includes science, which the SAT does not.

STUDY TIPS
    Something that will be very beneficial for you on the SAT is to have looked up SAT vocab words. The test tends to use hard words in order to try and stump you so knowing some will be useful. This site could be beneficial is helping you study. My advice would be to start a month in advance and do a set every night or every other night to really have time to let it soak in.

    Another way to study would be to go back over formulas for finding area and similar equations. The SAT asks a variety of questions on different math levels.

EAT AND SLEEP WELL
    The night before the test, make sure you go to bed with at least 8 hours to sleep! You do not want to be tired during the test. When you wake up, have a good breakfast of fruit and protein so you don’t get super hungry during the test. Breaks are super short and there will not be time for a meal!

DRESS FOR THE TEST
    Remember that you will be sitting down writing and reading for a nice 3-4 hours so your cute sequin dress might not be so great for this. Instead, wear your comfy shirt and leggings, or sweats, or loose jeans. Bring an extra layer like a jacket in case it is cold inside the testing room! Personally, I found that a nice loose shirt, my hoodie and leggings were perfect and I wore nice comfy loose shoes.

TIMED SECTIONS
    On the SATs every section is timed and you have that set amount of time to answer all questions. My advice to you is that on the reading, read first and answer questions but if you are really struggling, come back to it. For Math, I would figure out the non-multiple choice questions first because there is no penalty for getting an answer wrong so if you do not have time to figure out the multiple choice, you can guess. Another piece of advice for students is that if you do not know an answer, try to eliminate some of the options as much as you can! This really helped me.

THINGS THAT AREN’T ALLOWED
    The SAT is taken very seriously by collegeboard, and therefore there are strict rules the proctor (teacher leading it) must follow. Luckily it will be more comfortable since we are taking it with our regular Nova teachers. First thing to know, phones and backpacks are not allowed inside the testing room and cannot be accessed even during breaks. Secondly, even during breaks, you have to stay inside the classroom and you are unable to go to the smoker section to smoke a cigarette. Lastly, you aren’t allowed a book or paper to draw on for after the test, which can be really tough for some people.

TEST TIME:
    First of all, breathe. You will be okay! It is stressful but it will be over soon enough. Next, remember that you will get breaks in order to reduce to stress. You'll do great!

AFTER THE TEST
    You are usually able to get the scores after about a month and a half I believe and you are also able to find them on Collegeboard.com. Another thing is, you can take the test more than once! It isn’t a one time and done deal. You choose how many times you’d like to take it! Colleges take the highest scores you have and will use that data instead of the lowest or most recent.

PERSONAL ADVICE
    It is, in my opinion, a tricky test because of all the sitting around and timing. Personally, I am the type of person who needs the option to get up. What I did to help was that I arranged a ride home from the test and in the morning I took the bus so that I could walk around a bit and get my body and brain going. Personally, I think that really helps! Also, I practiced a breathing exercise in order to have that if I was getting anxious during the test. I also took the PSAT during sophomore year, which is really good in terms of getting an idea of what you’ll have to do.

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