Michaelsun Knapp

Gil Dreamt about Zombies and Women, poetry, Issue 21, December 1, 2012


Birthdate? 26 June 1989
 
When did you start writing? I’ve been writing creatively, periodically, from when I learned to write, but I have only taken it as a serious course over the last two years taking pains to improve my craft and push my capabilities.
 
When and what and where did you first get published? This is a little embarrassing, but my first published work was through my elementary school. Its cover was laminated construction paper. It was bound with black plastic rings. It was about my friend and I fighting monsters, and not very good. I did the illustrations myself. My first published work as a serious writer was a story about a florist who murdered a homeless man because she was dissatisfied with her home life.
 
What themes do you like to write about? I like to write about the relationships people have; how people are affected by them and how they allow themselves to be affected. I occasionally make these up, steal them from other people, or write them from my own life.
 
What books and/or stories have most resonated with you as an author? Why? How do these stories and their characters find expression in your work? As an author, I’ve found the poetry of Lorca and fiction of Sanderson have resonated with me the most, to have made me want to change and to be better. Lorca was my first introduction to surrealism in poetry and it opened ways of writing that I didn’t know were even available. Sanderson has affected me more technically, the podcast he’s on, alone, I feel has made me a stronger writer with how I’m doing things, and making me more aware of conscious choices I’m making as a writer not just with fiction but with poetry as well.  
 
Biography 
Michaelsun Knapp is Native American, a college graduate, really really ridiculously good looking, and has published in magazines as far away from L.A. County as Ball State’s The Broken Plate in Indiana and Long Beach’s Carnival. He has been published on the internet, on small sites, and somewhat larger sites, and sites that have fallen.