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Carl Alwin Schenck Memorial Forest


About

The Carl Alwin Schenck Memorial Forest, also known as the Schenck for short, is a 245 acre forest located in western Wake County, North Carolina. It is managed and owned by North Carolina State University as a teaching and research forest. Visitors can walk the trails to enjoy birdwatching and wildlife, see a managed forest that shows successional stages and enjoy the picnic facilities.






Directions

Coming from Chapel Hill/Durham Interstate 40 East bound:
  1. Take exit 289 (Wade Avenue)
  2. Go approximately 0.3 miles and take the Edwards Mill Road Exit
  3. Keep left at the fork and follow signs for US-70
  4. Off of the ramp turn left onto Edwards Mill Road
  5. In approximately 0.7 miles turn left onto Reedy Creek Road
  6. In approximately 0.3 miles your destination will be on your left
  7. The forest will be to your right as your coming in
Coming from South Raleigh Interstate 40 West bound:
  1. Take Exit 289 (Wade Avenue)
  2. Go approximately 0.8 miles and take the Edwards Mill Road exit
  3. Keep left at the fork and follow signs for US-70
  4. Off of the ramp turn left onto Edwards Mill Road

    Way of the Woods

    Here is a mushroom. A mushroom decomposes dead tissue
    in rotting plants to recycle nutrients back into the soil.
    Photograph taken by John Meece.
  5. In approximately 0.7 miles turn left onto Reedy Creek Road
  6. In approximately 0.3 miles your destination will be on your left
  7. The forest will be to your right as your coming in
Coming from Interstate 440 West bound (North Raleigh):
  1. Take exit 4B Wade Avenue towards I-40 West
  2. Approximately 1.5 miles take the Edwards Mill Road exit
  3. Keep right at fork and follow signs for US 70 and merge onto Edwards Mill Road
  4. In approximately 0.7 miles turn left onto Reedy Creek Road
  5. In approximately 0.3 miles your destination will be on your left
  6. The forest will be to your right as your coming in
If you would rather have a visual on where to go or if these directions did not suffice then below is a map with the coordinates. To get direction from where you are simply click the word "directions" on the map and it will send you to a site where you can type in your location.

Relative Location of the Schenck Forest


Points of Interest

The highlight of the Schenck is the Braham Arboretum. It contains a variety of tree species some professors use to quiz students. Go ahead and quiz yourself! There is also a wonderful picnic area less than 0.2 miles from the parking area.

Map

Rules

  • Do not block any gates as your vehicle may get towed at your expense - in case of emergency vehicles may need to enter the forest quickly and may need to move your vehicle to get into the forest.
  • No dogs allowed in the forest - due to complications in understanding and enforcing the "dogs on leashes" law we had to change this rule to a strict no dogs policy. Dogs obviously pose problems to other people but also have large impacts on wildlife.
  • No bicycles- the primary reason for not allowing bikes in the forest is because it bikes can cause major disruption in the soil. Major disruptions in the soil lead to erosion which causes sedimentation in creeks and streams. Sedimentation is the number one cause of water pollution in North Carolina. Although we have roads that service vehicles are permitted to drive on we have found bicycle tire tracts that erode trails.
  • Please take all trash with you - this is the basic leave it how you found it principle. 

Weather

Weather at the Schenck can be found by clicking on the link below:

Species List

For more information on each species simply click on the name. This list are some of the species that can be found at the Schenck Forest.

Plant

Needle

Pine Family (Pinaceae)
Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris)

Broad-leaf

Beach Family (Fagaceae)

"Baby" Longleaf

Above is a Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) seedling. Longleaf is the state tree of North Carolina. Many believe we are called the Tarheel state because the shoe-less slaves would harvest tar from this tree and get tar on the bottoms of their feet. Photographed by John Meece

Oaks

White Oaks

Red Oaks

Bean Family (Fabaceae)

Rose Family (Rosaceae)

Heath Family (Ericaceae)

Magnolia Family (Magnoliaceae)

Dogwood Family (Cornaceae)

Elm Family (Ulmaceae)

Walnut Family (Juglandaceae)

Olive Family (Oleaceae)

Other families

Nonative Invasive Species

Wildlife

Birds

Mammals

Rats, Mice, Voles


Squirrels

"Impaler" Tree

The Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) uses thorns of the 
Honey Locust (Gladitsia tricanthos)shown above, along with other sharp objects such as barbed wire, to impale it's prey while using it's hooked bill to dismember their victim. Photographed by John Meece

Vesper Bats

Weasels

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