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Getting Consent to do Research on Institutionalized Children

Title: Getting Consent to do Research on Institutionalized Children


Author: Emily E. Anderson (based on a case in Kimberly Hoagwood, Peter S. Jensen, and Celia B. Fisher, Ethical Issues in Mental Health Research with Children and Adolescents, Lawrence Erlbaum, 1996)


Description:

Investigators studying the neurological correlates of AIDS in infected children evaluate the risks and benefits to institutionalized child participants.


Headings: Study Design and Risk-Benefit Analysis; Institutionalized populations; Minors (children, adolescents)


Case Type: Decision Making


Getting Consent to do Research on Institutionalized Children

Investigators propose a study to examine the neurological correlates of AIDS in infected children (ages 8-12) whose mothers transmitted the HIV virus during pregnancy. The children are in a state hospital being treated for the end stages of AIDS. The research procedures include neurospsychological testing and MRI.

The research presents no more than minimal risk to the subjects but also offers no direct benefits. The researchers believe however that the research is likely to yield generalizable knowledge about the child participants’ disorder that could be applied to the diagnosis and treatment of other children with AIDS contracted through maternal transmission. (Based on a case in Kimberly Hoagwood, Peter S. Jensen, and Celia B. Fisher, Ethical Issues in Mental Health Research with Children and Adolescents, Lawrence Erlbaum, 1996)


Questions

  • Should this study be allowed?

See Hoagwood et al. (1996) for a discussion of how this case was addressed by the researchers.