NaPoWriMo 2014


April is National Poetry Month. In celebration, anyone can participate in the NaPoWriMo 30 poems in 30 days challenge.

If you want to learn more about NaPoWriMo, click here.
If you want to see Mrs. Kelm's poems from 2013's NaPoWriMo Challenge, click here.

Mrs. Kelm is going to take this challenge. Keep track of her challenge progress below. Want to join the fun? Try it at home. Talk to your friends. Visit the NaPoWriMo site each day for some inspiration for what you could write about.

NaPoWriMo 2014.doc



Looking for more cool poem stuff? Check out Guyku:
  


April 30, 2014

posted Apr 29, 2014, 1:16 PM by Danielle Kelm   [ updated Apr 30, 2014, 9:41 AM ]

DAY 30 - 4/30 - GOODBYE POEM
Today's Poem of the Day: "Today, as befits the final poem of NaPoWriMo, I challenge you to write a poem of farewell. It doesn’t have to be goodbye forever — like I said, NaPoWriMo will be back again next year. If you need a little inspiration, you might find some in perusing this selection of goodbye-and-good-luck poems from the Poetry Foundation website."

Things/People to Say Goodbye To:
  • Goodbye to siblings going to college
  • Goodbye winter! (and good riddance!)
  • Goodbye to a fave teacher
  • Goodbye to a favorite belonging (t-shirt, flip-flops)
  • Goodbye to a friend/relative/pet who has died
  • Goodbye to friends who are moving
  • Goodbye to a house/town/school if you are moving

POEM OF THE DAY FORM: Goodbye Poem
CHARACTERISTIC(S) OF POETRY: AlliterationRepetitionRhymeRepetitionOnomatopoeiaRepetition, and Repetition. 

"To the Class of 2019"
The year has flown by
and soon it will come to a close.
For the first time in 11 years,
I won't be here 
to say goodbye.

To share hugs.
To sign your yearbooks (and have you sign mine).
To feel the excitement of the last day
build and build and build
until the final bell rings.

*sigh*

So here are the things I'd tell you 
on the last day of school:
Thank you for a great year!
Thank you for making me laugh! (Lots!)
I wish you all the best in 8th grade next year.
If you see me around town this summer,
don't be afraid to say "Hi!" 
(or at least give me a head nod of recognition)
Once you're one of my kids in class,
you're ALWAYS one of my kids--
so come back and visit. Really.
You'll be missed!
Read LOTS!

And, yes, you can check out books from me next year.

Have a great summer!

April 29, 2014

posted Apr 29, 2014, 6:17 AM by Danielle Kelm   [ updated May 1, 2014, 5:39 AM ]

DAY 29 - 4/29 - 10 LINES POEM
Today's Poem of the Day: "This may remind you a bit of the “New York School” recipe, but this prompt has been around for a long time. I remember using it in a college poetry class, and loving the result. It really forces you into details, and to work on “conducting” the poem as it grows, instead of trying to force the poem to be one thing or another in particular. The prompt is called the “Twenty Little Poetry Projects,” and was originally developed by Jim Simmerman. And here are the twenty little projects themselves — the challenge is to use them all in one poem:

1. Begin the poem with a metaphor.
2. Say something specific but utterly preposterous.
3. Use at least one image for each of the five senses, either in succession or scattered randomly throughout the poem.
4. Use one example of synesthesia (mixing the senses).
5. Use the proper name of a person and the proper name of a place.
6. Contradict something you said earlier in the poem.
7. Change direction or digress from the last thing you said.
8. Use a word (slang?) you’ve never seen in a poem.
9. Use an example of false cause-effect logic.
10. Use a piece of talk you’ve actually heard (preferably in dialect and/or language which you don’t understand).
11. Create a metaphor using the following construction: “The (adjective) (concrete noun) of (abstract noun) . . .”
12. Use an image in such a way as to reverse its usual associative qualities.
Make the persona or character in the poem do something he or she could not do in “real life.”
13. Make the persona or character in the poem do something he or she could not do in “real life.”
14. Refer to yourself by nickname and in the third person.
15. Write in the future tense, such that part of the poem seems to be a prediction.
16. Modify a noun with an unlikely adjective.
17. Make a declarative assertion that sounds convincing but that finally makes no sense.
18. Use a phrase from a language other than English.
19. Make a non-human object say or do something human (personification).
20. Close the poem with a vivid image that makes no statement, but that “echoes” an image from earlier in the poem."

Wow. Today's poem of the day is a CHALLENGING one. Using all 20 of these seems pretty intense, so I say scale it back and try to use 10 of these instead. Or write a poem of your choice instead. You choose!

POEM OF THE DAY FORM: 10 Lines Poem
CHARACTERISTIC(S) OF POETRY: MetaphorAlliterationRhymeAlliteration, Alliteration, Personification, and Alliteration.

"The Power of Books"
Books are a vacation from real life.

1. Begin the poem with a metaphor.
They can have anywhere from one to 1,000,000,000 pages or more. 

 2. Say something specific but utterly preposterous.
Old books have a funky smell of old about them.
New books have slippery pages that can cut you.
Ears hear the sound of scratching as my fingers turn the pages.
Eyes glancing at the words.

 3. Use at least one image for each of the five senses, either in succession or scattered randomly throughout the poem.
Taste the flavors of the words on the pages.

 4. Use one example of synesthesia (mixing the senses).
Harry Potter arrives at Hogwarts for another year.
 5. Use the proper name of a person and the proper name of a place.
1,000,000,000 pages is too many for any one person to read in a single book. So is 1,000,000. 

 6. Contradict something you said earlier in the poem.
But if you have the time to read, 
why not aim high?

 7. Change direction or digress from the last thing you said.
Snagglefritz!

 8. Use a word (slang?) you’ve never seen in a poem.
I once couldn't read a book
after it gave me a funny look.

 9. Use an example of false cause-effect logic.
I'm fixing to read me a book
right now--

 10. Use a piece of talk you’ve actually heard (preferably in dialect and/or language which you don’t understand).
The Big Book of Bravery. 11. Create a metaphor using the following construction: “The (adjective) (concrete noun) of (abstract noun)...”
??? 12. Use an image in such a way as to reverse its usual associative qualities.
Make the persona or character in the poem do something he or she could not do in “real life.”
Harry Potter gave birth to a baby boy. 13. Make the persona or character in the poem do something he or she could not do in “real life.”

Kelmie loves books! 14. Refer to yourself by nickname and in the third person.

Books will become even more popular as e-readers
continue to change the world of reading. 

 15. Write in the future tense, such that part of the poem seems to be a prediction.

Crunchy books are the best ones to devour. 16. Modify a noun with an unlikely adjective.

??? 17. Make a declarative assertion that sounds convincing but that finally makes no sense.

J'aime lire! 18. Use a phrase from a language other than English.

Books call me to read them.  19. Make a non-human object say or do something human (personification).

Slippery pages with the sound of scratching as fingers slowly turn the pages. 20. Close the poem with a vivid image that makes no statement, but that “echoes” an image from earlier in the poem."


April 28, 2014

posted Apr 28, 2014, 5:39 AM by Danielle Kelm   [ updated Apr 28, 2014, 9:10 AM ]

DAY 28 - 4/28 - NEWS POEM
Today's Poem of the Day: "Today I challenge you to find a news article, and to write a poem using (mostly, if not only) words from the article! You can repeat them, splice them, and rearrange them however you like. Although the vocabulary may be “just the facts,” your poem doesn’t have to be — it doesn’t even have to be about the subject of the news article itself. Happy writing!"

Below are a few sources for news that may be of help to you. Feel free to find your own sources if these aren't your preferred places to get your news.
 http://northwrightcounty.today/ http://www.twincities.com/ http://www.startribune.com/ http://www.usatoday.com/


POEM OF THE DAY FORM: News Poem
CHARACTERISTIC(S) OF POETRY: AlliterationRepetitionAlliterationand Alliteration.


Words I'm pulling from the article to include in my poem: justices, police, "subject to search", "locate weapons", "preserve evidence", 4th Amendment, search and seizures, creating new Fourth Amendment puzzles for police to solve

"Search and Seizure?"
Justices will rule
on the Fourth Amendment,
which deals with search and seizures.
In this case, it's cellphones that are in question.

Is your cellphone subject to search without a warrant?

"But we need to locate weapons," they say.
"But we need to preserve evidence," they say.
"But drug deals and worse happen over the devices," they say.
All of this creates new Fourth Amendment puzzles 
for police to solve.

Search and seizure? 
Maybe.
But they may need a search warrant
before they seize our phones.
The Supreme Court will decide.

April 27, 2014

posted Apr 28, 2014, 5:38 AM by Danielle Kelm   [ updated Apr 30, 2014, 8:47 AM ]

DAY 27 - 4/27 - PHOTO POEM
Today's Poem of the Day: "Our early-bird prompt this year (on March 31) was an ekphrastic poem. This is something similar — a poem written from a photograph. There are four below, one of which I hope will catch your fancy. But if you’ve a particular photo in mind that you’d like to use, go right ahead. Happy writing!"
  
  


POEM OF THE DAY FORM: Photo Poem
CHARACTERISTIC(S) OF POETRY: AlliterationAlliterationRhymeand Assonance.

"Snow-Covered Streets"
The sound of silence
as the snow 
falls
down.

Gentle fluffy flakes
float 
from
the
sky.

Footprints left behind
as feet walk down the street.

Snow-covered streets
empty of cars.

Drinking hot cocoa inside the house.
Chocolate mustaches all around.

April 26, 2014

posted Apr 28, 2014, 5:34 AM by Danielle Kelm   [ updated Apr 29, 2014, 12:13 PM ]

DAY 26 - 4/26 - CURTAL SONNET
Today's Poem of the Day: "Today’s prompt comes to us from Vince Gotera, who wrote his “family member” poem for Day 20 in the form of a curtal sonnet. As Vince explains, the curtal sonnet is shorter than the normal, fourteen line sonnet. Instead it has a first stanza of six lines, followed by a second stanza of four, and then closes with a half-line. The form was invented in the 1800s by Gerard Manley Hopkins, who used it in his famous poem “Pied Beauty”. So for today, I challenge you to give the curtal sonnet a whirl. It doesn’t need to rhyme — though it can if you like — and feel free to branch out beyond iambic pentameter. Happy writing!

POEM OF THE DAY FORM: Curtal Sonnet
CHARACTERISTIC(S) OF POETRY: AlliterationOnomatopoeiaAlliterationOnomatopoeia and RepetitionAlliterationOnomatopoeia, and Alliteration. 

"Last Day of School"
Students and staff buzzing with anticipation.
Hallways filled with laughter, shorts, and flip-flops.
Classrooms filled with students watching the clock
hour by hour.
Time is ticking by.
Tick, tockTicktock. Ticktock.

Lunch at last!
Eating outside with 
friends in the sun.
Groups of people clustered all around.

Whoosh! The day is DONE!

April 25, 2014

posted Apr 24, 2014, 12:59 PM by Danielle Kelm   [ updated Apr 28, 2014, 9:26 AM ]

DAY 25 - 4/25 - ANAPHORA POEM
Today's Poem of the Day: "Anaphora is a literary term for the practice of repeating certain words or phrases at the beginning of multiple clauses or, in the case of a poem, multiple lines. The phrase “A time to,” as used in the third Chapter of Ecclesiastes, is a good example of anaphora. But you don’t have to be the Old Testament (or a Byrds song) to use anaphora. Allen Ginsberg used it in Howl, for example. This post by Rebecca Hazelton on the Poetry Foundation’s blog gives other great examples of anaphora in action, from Martin Luther King Jr’s “I Have a Dream” speech to Homer Simpson. So today, I challenge you to write a poem that uses anaphora. Find a phrase, and stick with it — learn how far it can go. Happy writing!"

POEM OF THE DAY FORM: Anaphora Poem
CHARACTERISTIC(S) OF POETRY: Repetition, Alliteration, and Alliteration.

"Rain Brings"
Rain.
Driving down for three days straight.
One more week of rain to go.

What does rain bring?

Rain brings worms to the surface.
Rain brings green grass.
Rain brings new spring leaves.
Rain brings squeaky shoes on the floor.
Rain brings grilled cheese and tomato soup for lunch and chili for supper.
Rain brings Kylie's first time using an umbrella at the bus stop.
Rain brings soaked socks - time for a change.
Rain brings rainbows.

Most importantly is what rain doesn't bring: SNOW!

April 24, 2014

posted Apr 24, 2014, 5:36 AM by Danielle Kelm   [ updated Apr 24, 2014, 12:58 PM ]

DAY 24 - 4/24 - BUILDING POEM
Today's Poem of the Day: "Peter Roberts has been participating in NaPoWriMo for several years now at his blog, Masonry Design. He has the charming and odd distinction of having only written poems about masonry. Today, I challenge you to do the same (for one day, at least), and to write a poem that features walls, bricks, stones, arches, or the like. If that sounds a bit hard, remember that one of Robert Frost’s most famous poems was about a wall. Happy writing!"

POEM OF THE DAY FORM: Building Poem
CHARACTERISTIC(S) OF POETRY: AlliterationAlliterationRhymeAlliterationAlliterationAlliteration, and Onomatopoeia/Rhyme. 

"Sticks and Stones"
Sticks and stones
may break our bones,
but they can also be used
to build buildings.

When the wolf comes 
huffing and puffing,
you'd better hope that 
your house isn't made of straw.
Sticks are a smidge better,
but stones are your best bet for a building
that lasts.

Huff! Puff!
Nice try, Wolf!

April 23, 2014

posted Apr 23, 2014, 6:25 AM by Danielle Kelm   [ updated Apr 23, 2014, 10:36 AM ]

DAY 23 - 4/23 - INTERNATIONAL POEM
Today's Poem of the Day: "Today’s prompt is an oldie-but-a-goodie: the homophonic translation. Find a poem in a language you don’t know and translate it into English based on the look of the words and their sounds. 

For example, here are three lines from a poem by the Serbian poet Vasko Popa:
Posle radnog vremena
Radnici su umorni
Jedva cekaju da stignu u barake

I might translate this into English as:
Post-grad eggnog, ramen noodles.
Nikki in the morning,
jacket just stuck with brakes.

That doesn’t make a lot of sense, but it does give me some new words and ideas to play with. Happy writing!"



POEM OF THE DAY FORM: International Poem
CHARACTERISTIC(S) OF POETRY: None needed for this crazy poem!

 "Gen Ugg" by Danielle Kelm "Genug!" by Elke Erb
Watch ick off. Whoa sinned
mine understand? Ring some? Yes,
was zoo sign hat?

There fells (nicks all-stars in)
there cobbler (guess shops, man)
(lemon and lemon lawsuit),

that spoon ten off brand end meer
(spoon off or likes him and her).
And besides viper nicks.

An and fur sick
vie go hobbit?

Halt is an,
and ick - what's up?

Wache ich auf? Wo sind
meine 
Umstände? Ringsum? Das,
was zu sein hat?

Der Fels (nichts als Starrsinn)
der Adler (Geschäftsmann)
(leben und leben lassen), 

das unten aufbrandende Meer
(unaufhörliches Hin & Her).
Und besagt weiter nichts.

An und für sich.
Wie gehabt?

Hält es an,
und ich – wache auf?

April 22, 2014

posted Apr 21, 2014, 11:06 AM by Danielle Kelm   [ updated Apr 22, 2014, 5:48 AM ]

DAY 22 - 4/22 - KIDS' POEM
Today's Poem of the Day: "Today I challenge you to write a poem for children. This could be in the style of a nursery rhyme, or take a cue from Jack Prelutsky or Shel Silverstein. It could rhyme--or not. It could be short--or not. Happy writing!"

POEM OF THE DAY FORM: Kids' Poem
CHARACTERISTIC(S) OF POETRY: Repetition, Alliteration, Alliteration, Onomatopoeia, Repetition, and Onomatopoeia

"Ice Cream Truck"
Each spring brings
the sound of the ice cream truck
to our neighborhood.

Each visit brings 
the sound of children
racing to their parents and piggybanks
for money.

Ooh, that one! No, that one!
Can't I get them all?!

Sitting on the sidewalk
Lick, drip, slurp.
Sticky, sticky hands.
Ice cream-stained faces.
Mmm...so good!

April 21, 2014

posted Apr 21, 2014, 5:50 AM by Danielle Kelm   [ updated Apr 23, 2014, 9:49 AM ]

DAY 21 - 4/21 - "NEW YORK SCHOOL" POEM
Today's Poem of the Day: "Today’s prompt is to write a “New York School” poem using the recipe found at the bottom of this prompt. The New York School is the name by which a group of poets that all lived in New York in the 1950s and 1960s. The most well-known members are Frank O’Hara, John Ashbery, and Kenneth Koch. Their poems are actually very different from one another, but many “New York School” poems display a sort of conversational tone, references to friends and to places in and around New York, humor, inclusion of pop culture, and a sense of the importance of art (visual, poetic, and otherwise). Here’s a fairly representative example.

In following the recipe, you can include as many (or as few) of the listed elements as you wish. Happy writing!"

For your "recipe", you are encouraged to use as many of the following "ingredients" as possible: 
  1. at least one addressee (to which you may or may not wish to dedicate your poem)
  2. use of specific place names and dates (time, day, month, year)--especially the names of places in and around New York City
  3. prolific use of proper names
  4. at least one reminiscence, aside, digression, or anecdote
  5. one or more quotations, especially from things people have said in conversation or through the media
  6. a moment where you call into question at least one thing you have said or proposed throughout your poem so far
  7. something that sounds amazing even if it doesn’t make any sense to you
  8. pop cultural references
  9. consumer goods/services
  10. mention of natural phenomena (in which natural phenomena do not appear ‘natural’)
  11. at least one celebrity
  12. at least one question directed at the addressee/imagined reader
  13. the words “life” and “death”
  14. at least one exclamation/declaration of love
  15. references to fine art, theater, music, or film
  16. food items
  17. gossip
  18. mention of sleep or dreaming
  19. use of ironic overtones
To get inspired, you may want to visit gossip sites like Us Weekly or People to get the latest headlines.

POEM OF THE DAY FORM: New York School Poem
CHARACTERISTIC(S) OF POETRY: Alliteration, Assonance, Assonance, Repetition, andAlliteration.

"Yikes!"   Recipe Ingredient Number
Dear Justin,

 1
I read the latest headline from Us Weekly and it mentions your name.

Lots.

 
"Yikes! Justin Bieber Apologizes After Controversial Visit." 1, 17
"Yikes! Justin Bieber and Selena Gomez got into a massive fight during a dinner date Friday night." 1, 17

"Yikes! Justin Bieber gets kicked out of his Buenos Aires hotel due to rowdy #Beliebers" 1, 17
"Yikes! Justin Bieber was reportedly attacked at a Toronto nightclub Saturday." 1, 17
 
Seriously, dude, you need to find something else
to do with your time.

Catch up on your sleep.
Go see a movie.
Maybe a musical? I hear Bring It On is pretty good.

I love you too much (unlike Selena Gomez) to stand by and watch you
hurt yourself.

No, scratch that, I really don't love you after all.

Yikes, it's time to wake up
and begin again.
I belieb in you.

Love forever and always,
Your #1 Belieber
 



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