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Carmen M. Greenwood, Ph.D. 
Dept. of Fisheries, Wildlife and Environmental Studies 
SUNY Cobleskill
Cobleskill, NY 13317
greenwcm@cobleskill.edu 
Phone 518-255-5584
Dr. Greenwood trapping carrion beetles 2013

I am a broadly trained Conservation biologist and Invertebrate Zoologist with interests in Behavioral and Community Ecology of assemblages of invertebrate organisms.  I have worked extensively with insects, arachnids and nematodes and have a particular interest in those that dwell in the soil. Students in my lab have addressed questions related to the impacts of disturbance on invertebrate communities (i.e. soil-dwelling invertebrates, forage taxa, native pollinators, predators, etc.), food web interactions, 

conservation, and arthropod succession in the presence of an introduced resource.   Disturbance may occur naturally in a system or result from anthropogenic influences such as tillage, prescribed burning, grazing, soil amendment, development, habitat fragmentation, compaction or introduction of invasive species.  We are currently heavily involved in research focused on conservation of the federally endangered American Burying Beetle.  Work in the Greenwood lab includes a heavy emphasis on field ecology and behavioral ecology.If you are interested in invertebrate field ecology or behavioral ecology and would like to join our very "student-focused" research team please email me regarding your specific interests. 

Projects currently underway in our lab::

  • Expanded methodologies for long term monitoring of relocation survival and population density of federally endangered American Burying Beetle (Nicrophorus americanus) in Oklahoma, and Kentucky (duration Sep 2012- Dec 2016).   This effort has expanded into a proposed re-introduction of American Burying Beetle into several locations in the eastern United States.  Opportunities for research related to the re-introduction effort exist for students interested in conservation, ecology or basic biological questions related to carrion-feeding beetles. Student researchers involved: 

Thomas Ferrari, M.S. candidate in Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University

Kyle Risser, Ph.D. candidate in Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University

Beetle trappers 2013

Recently completed projects:
  • The Effect of Preferred Arthropod Availability on Bobwhite Quail Nest Site Selection and Chick Survival (duration: July 2011- Dec 2014): This is a large, interdisciplinary project involving multiple collaborators and multiple states. Graduate students working on this project are evaluating the effects of a variety of factors that impact arthropod community composition within Beaver and Packsaddle Wildlife management areas of western Oklahoma. Studies focus on arthropod taxa known to be key forage species for juvenile quail.   Oklahoma Dept. of Wildlife Conservation. Student researchers involved: 

Kenneth Masloski; M.S. candidate in Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University: Evidence for diet-driven habitat partitioning of Melanoplinae and Gomphocerinae grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) along a vegetation gradient in a Western Oklahoma grassland and comparison of standard versus a novel sampling methodology for grasshoppers.  If you are interested in invertebrate field ecology or behavioral ecology and would like to join our very "student-focused" research team please email me regarding your specific interests. 

Allison Giguere; M.S. candidate in Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University: Community composition and resource partitioning of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in western Oklahoma grassland ecosystems.

Shane Foye; M.S. candidate in Entomology and Plant Pathology: Characterization of ground-dwelling arthropod assemblages and Entomopathogenic nematodes in Northern bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) habitat.


Kyle Risser; M.S. Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University
2012. Profile of ecoregion and management practices impacts on prevalence and diversity of native entomopathogenic nematodes in Oklahoma.


Alexandra Robideau; undergraduate Niblack scholar (2011) in Entomology and Plant Pathology,
Oklahoma State University
: Prevalence and diversity of native Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) in organic versus conventional wheat and beef production systems in Oklahoma.


Mackenzie Jochim; undergraduate Niblack scholar Oklahoma State University (2012) Impacts of Grazing (Cattle vs. Bison) and Controlled Burning on native Entomopathogenic Nematode (EPN) Prevalence in the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve



Colby Gregg: undergraduate Niblack scholar Oklahoma State University
 (2012) in Entomology and Plant Pathology: Native pollinator conservation within the Cow Creek remediation project at IERES (Integrated Environmental Research and Education Site)

Recent publications (*publications with students):

*Foye, S., C. Greenwood, M. Payton and K. Masloski. 2014. Characterization of ground-dwelling arthropod forage communities that support Colinus virginianus (Galliformes: Odontophoridae) in two western Oklahoma Wildlife Management Areas.  Rangeland Ecology and Management. In preparation

*Foye, S., C. Greenwood, and M. Payton. 2014. Virulence of indigenous entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) towards Diorhabda carinulata, a potential biological control agent for the reduction of Tamarix ramosissima in northern bobwhite habitat. Southwestern Entomology. In preparation

*Giguere, A., C. Greenwood, and M. Payton. 2014. Community composition and resource partitioning of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in western Oklahoma grassland ecosystems: a critical forage taxon of the northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus). Rangeland Ecology and Management. In preparation

Greenwood, C., and P. Gagnon. 2014. Preliminary survey of carrion beetle (Coleoptera: Silphidae) community composition in the Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area of Western Kentucky:  A site targeted for re-introduction of American Burying Beetle (Nicrophorus americanus).  Conservation Biology.  In preparation

*Masloski, K., C. Greenwood, M. Payton, M. Reiskind. 2014.Grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae) relative abundance and density: a comparison between standard and novel methods of sampling. Journal of Orthoptera Research.  In review

*Masloski, K., M. Payton, M. Reiskind, C. Greenwood. 2014. Evidence for diet-driven habitat partitioning of Melanoplinae and Gomphocerinae grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) along a vegetation gradient in a Western Oklahoma grassland.  Environmental Entomology. Accepted.

Antonenko, P. and C. Greenwood. 2013. Fostering collaborative problem solving and 21st century skills using the DEEPER scaffolding framework. Journal of College Science Teaching. Accepted.

*Masloski, K. and C. Greenwood. 2013. First record of Myrmecophilus nebrascensis (Orthoptera:  Myrmecophilidae) in Beaver Co., Oklahoma. Journal of Orthoptera Research. 22(1):  69-71.

*Risser, K. and C. Greenwood.  2013. Entomopathogenic Nematode (EPN) Prevalence and Diversity Across a State Wide Precipitation Gradient in Oklahoma. Southwestern Entomologist. In review

*Jochim, M., C. Greenwood and K. Risser. 2013.  Impacts of Grazing (Cattle vs. Bison) and Controlled Burning on Entomopathogenic Nematode (EPN) Prevalence in the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve. Southwestern Entomologist. In review.

*Robideau, A., K. Risser and C. Greenwood. 2013.  Prevalence of native entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) in organic versus conventional wheat and beef production systems in Oklahoma. Southwestern Entomologist. In review.

*Booher, E., C. Greenwood and J. Hattey.  2012. Effects of Soil Amendments on Soil Microarthropods in Continuous Maize in Western Oklahoma..  Southwestern Entomologist. Vol. 37, No. 1, pp. 12-20.

*Jones, M. E., Antonenko, P. D., and Greenwood, C. 2012. The impact of collaborative and individualized Student Response System strategies on learner motivation, metacognition, and knowledge transfer. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning. 28(3): 477-487.

*Dubie, T. and C. Greenwood, C. Godsey and M. Payton.  2011.  Effects of tillage on soil microarthropods in winter wheat.  Southwestern Entomologist. 36(1): 11-21.

*Ibrahim, M., Antonenko, P., Greenwood, C., and Wheeler, D. 2011. Effects of segmenting, signaling, and weeding on learning from educational video. Learning, Media, and Technology. 37(3): 220-235.

Greenwood, C., M. Barbercheck and C. Brownie.  2011.  Short term response of soil microinvertebrates to application of  entomopathogenic nematode-infected insects in two tillage systems.  Pedobiologia. (54)(3):  177-186.

Greenwood, C.M. and E.G. Maurakis.  1998.  Breeding Behaviors in Notropis alborus  (Actinopterygii: Cyprinidae).  VA Journal of Science 49 (3): 163 -172.

Extension fact sheets

Greenwood C. and E. Rebek. 2009.  Detection, Conservation and Augmentation of Naturally Occurring Beneficial Nematodes for Natural Pest Suppression.  Oklahoma State University Cooperative Extension Service Fact Sheet EPP7670.