Homework

What did we do today?
Here you will find daily posts about what we did in class. Posts will include learning targets, warm ups, classwork, assignment descriptions and rubrics, and due dates and deadlines. Use this page to keep up with your daily work, especially when you have been absent. Questions? Email Genevieve.Hollerich@mpls.k12.mn.us.

05/23 Tues: Working on Part II (Mr. Galindo absent)

posted by Genevieve Hollerich   [ updated ]

Learning Target(s): 
  • I can make suggestions to improve the example graphic story.
  • I understand the "One Story" assignment and how it will be graded. 
  • I can finish Part I, proofread it, edit it, and share it with the teacher. 
  • I can start Part II and/or finish reading Persepolis
Warm Up: 
What suggestions can  you make to improve this example?


Classwork:
  • Share out suggestions to improve the example: Use punctuation, capitalize, add narrative captions, add more visual details (background, facial expressions, etc.), add more panels. 
  • Review the rubric. Any questions?
  1. Complete the textual narrative, Part I of the “One Story, Two Perspectives, Two Genres” assignment.
  2. Type it, proofread, and edit it. Remember: Sentences start with capital letters and end with a punctuation mark. Proper nouns are capitalized.
  3. Show your completed story to your teacher before starting Part II.
  4. Decide whose perspective you're going to use in Part II, the graphic story, and get started!
  5. Finish reading Persepolis and turn in your reading notes graphic organizer. 
Homework: 
  • Continue working on your “One Story…” assignment. 
DUE DATE: Friday, 5/26
DEADLINE: Thursday, 6/1

05/22 Mon: Finishing Part I, Starting Part II (Ms. Hollerich absent)

posted by Genevieve Hollerich   [ updated ]

Learning Target(s): 
  • I can turn in all work marked "Missing" in the Portal.
  • I understand the "One Story" assignment and how it will be graded. 
  • I can draft Part I, proofread it, edit it, and share it with the teacher. 
  • I can start Part II and/or finish reading Persepolis
Warm Up:
The DEADLINE for work marked “Missing” in the Portal is today. Put all late work/missing work in the tray at the front of the room. 

Review the assignment description for the “One Story, Two Perspectives, Two Genres” assignment and rubric. 
  • How many points is this assignment worth? 
  • What do you need to do to get a perfect score? 
  • What questions do you have about the assignment and/or how it will be graded? 
Classwork:
  • Go over the rubric. Any questions?
  • Plan for the day:
  1. Complete your draft of Part I of the “One Story, Two Perspectives, Two Genres” assignment.
  2. Type it, proofread, and edit it. Remember: Sentences start with capital letters and end with a punctuation mark. Proper nouns are capitalized.
  3. Show your completed story to your teacher before starting Part II.
  4. Finish reading Persepolis and turn in your reading notes graphic organizer. 
Homework:
  • Continue working on your “One Story…” assignment. 
DUE DATE: Friday, 5/26
DEADLINE: Thursday, 6/1

05/19 Fri: "One Story, Two Perspectives, Two Genres," Part I

posted May 19, 2017, 11:02 AM by Genevieve Hollerich

Learning Target(s):
  • I can evaluate a hypothetical risk. 
  • I can review a model textual narrative (written story). 
  • I can prewrite and generate ideas for Part I of the “One Story” assignment.
  • I can start a Google doc and share it with my teacher.
  • I can draft Part I of the "One Story" assignment.


Classwork:
  • Discuss the hypothetical scenario with your “ANTonym” partner, then share out as a class.
    • Review: What you think is “risky,” “right,” or “safe” is subjective. It’s up to you. Keep this in mind as you start the "One Story, Two Perspectives, Two Genres" assignment.
  • Read the student exemplar aloud. 
    • Identify the risk, what’s safe, and what’s right. Identify an alternative perspective that could be used for the graphic story.
  • Prewrite for 4 minutes.

Homework:
  • Continue drafting your textual narrative (Part I) and think about/identify whose point of view you will include in the graphic story (Part II). We'll work on Part II as a class next week. 
  • Finish Persepolis by Monday and take reading notes using one of the graphic organizers. When you’re done, turn it in.

REMINDER: 

The DEADLINE for all assignments currently marked “Missing” in the Portal is Monday, 5/22.


05/18 Thurs: Evaluating risks, "One Story, Two Perspectives, Two Genres"

posted May 18, 2017, 7:14 AM by Genevieve Hollerich   [ updated May 18, 2017, 7:41 AM ]

Learning Target(s):
  • I can review risks characters have taken and evaluate those risks.
  • I can identify and evaluate risks characters continue to take. 
  • I can read and annotate the "One Story, Two Perspectives, Two Genres" assignment description and rubric. 
Warm Up: 
Pick up an index card on your way in. Write your name and your answers to the questions below:
  1. REVIEW: How old was Marjane when her parents sent her to Austria? 
  2. REVIEW: Why did her parents send her there? 
  3. REVIEW: Why does Marjane return to Iran? 
  4. EVALUATE: Marjane’s parents took a big risk sending their child to live on her own in a foreign country. Did they do the right thing? Explain your answer. 
Classwork 
  • Turn and talk to share out your Warm Up responses, then share out as a class. Pass forward index cards when done.
  • Take out your Persepolis Viewing Guide and review the risks taken in the second half of the film adaptation. Did the character do the right thing? Why or why not? 
  • Finish watching Persepolis and chart and evaluate risks.
  • When the film is over, read the "After Viewing" question and answer it in writing, then pass your guide forward.
  • Read the "One Story, Two Perspectives, Two Genres" assignment description and rubric.
Homework:
  • Start thinking about what you're going to write about for the "One Story, Two Perspectives, Two Genres" assignment. Come prepared to write tomorrow!
  • Finish Persepolis by Monday and take reading notes using one of the graphic organizers. When you’re done, turn it in!
One Story, Two Perspectives, Two Genres DUE DATE: Thurs. 5/25
One Story, Two Perspectives, Two Genres DEADLINE: Thurs. 6/1

05/17 Wed: Cloud Coach Email #6

posted May 17, 2017, 6:02 AM by Genevieve Hollerich   [ updated May 17, 2017, 6:02 AM ]

Learning Target(s):
  • I can read and annotate the Week 6 Gateway Prompt. 
  • I can respond professionally to my mentor’s email and thoroughly address the email prompt. 
  • I can read Persepolis and/or work on missing work for English. 
Entrance Instructions: 
  1. Pick up a Gateway prompt on your way in. 
  2. Read it and circle any parts you find confusing. 
  3. Underline the specific things you should include in your email. 

Classwork:
  • Share out Prompt annotations. Any questions?
  1. Check your school email account for an email from your mentor. 
  2. Read the email. 
  3. Select “Reply All” to respond. 
  4. In your response, you should answer any questions your mentor has asked as well as the questions in the Week 6 Gateway Prompt. To lengthen your email and ensure that you've answered the questions thoroughly, be specific and give examples.
Before you hit “Send”: 
  • Proofread and edit your email. It should be as professional as possible. 
  • Make sure you're sending your email to your mentor's General Mills address AND the Best Prep monitor email address or you won’t get credit for your email! 
Homework: 
  • Read through pg. 134 of Persepolis by Thursday and take reading notes using one of the graphic organizers. When you’re done, turn it in!

05/15 Mon. and 05/16 Tues: MAP Test/Persepolis (film)

posted May 15, 2017, 7:37 AM by Genevieve Hollerich

1st, 3rd, and 6th Hour: MAP Testing in Lab 201 on Monday
2nd and 4th Hour: MAP Testing in Lab 201 on Tuesday

Learning Target(s):

  • I can write about a risk I’ve taken and evaluate whether it was a good or a bad risk. 
  • I can identify and share risks characters in Persepolis took in the first part of the film adaptation. 
  • I can watch Persepolis and continue charting risk-taking. 
Entrance Instructions:
  1. Pick up an index card on your way in. 
  2. Write your name on it. 
  3. Write about a time you took a risk. What risk did you take? Why did you take it? Was it a good risk or a bad risk? 
  4. When you’re done, put your index card in the box at the front of the room and take out Friday’s Persepolis Viewing Guide. 
Mini-Memoir DEADLINE: Monday 5/16! 

Classwork

  • If you have not already, turn in your Mini-Memoir!
  • Share out two examples of risk-taking in Persepolis. 
  • Continue viewing Persepolis and charting and evaluating risks. 
Homework:
  • Read through pg. 134 of Persepolis by Thursday and take reading notes using one of the graphic organizers. When you’re done, turn it in! 

05/12 Fri: OPTIC analysis due, Evaluating risks, Charting risks in Persepolis

posted May 12, 2017, 10:52 AM by Genevieve Hollerich

Learning Target(s):
  • I can identify graphic novel terms and concepts in my own writing. 
  • I can reflect on and write about risk-taking. 
  • I can watch Persepolis and chart characters' risks.
Entrance Instructions:
  1. Take out your OPTIC analysis from yesterday and your list of graphic novel terms and concepts.
  2. Reread your OPTIC analysis Conclusion paragraph.
  3. Circle or underline the graphic novel terms/concepts you used in your paragraph. 
  4. Put your finished OPTIC analysis in the tray at the front of the room. 

Classwork:
  • Complete the Before Viewing section of the Persepolis Viewing Guide.
  • Work on the During Viewing section as you watch Persepolis.
Homework and Reminders:
  1. Read through pg. 117 of Persepolis by Monday, 5/15.
  2. Mini-Memoir DEADLINE: Monday, 5/15
  3. Hours 1, 3, and 6: MAP Test: Monday, 5/15, Lab 201 
  4. Hours 2 and 4: MAP Test Tuesday, 5/16, Lab 201 (4th Hour should go to 1st Lunch)

05/12 Thurs: Using OPTIC write a fully developed paragraph of analysis

posted May 11, 2017, 11:07 AM by Genevieve Hollerich

Learning Target(s):
  • I can review what OPTIC stands for. 
  • I can use OPTIC to analyze an image for meaning. 
  • I can write a fully developed paragraph of analysis.
Warm Up: Pick up an index card on your way in. Write your name on it.

Check for Understanding:
Answer the following questions, then put your card in the box at the front of the room.
  1. Without looking at your OPTIC handout, what does OPTIC stand for? 
  2. What’s OPTIC for? 
Classwork: 
  • Review Warm Up answers: Overview, Parts, Text/Title, Interrelationships, Conclusion (paragraph) / OPTIC is used to analyze visual texts (images). 
  • Look at the panel in the top left hand corner of Persepolis pg. 6.
  • As a class, verbally walk through the OPTIC steps of analysis.
  • On your own, use OPTIC to analyze the image below:

  • Include at least three graphic novel terms/concepts in your Conclusion paragraph. DUE: Tomorrow, Friday, 5/12.
Homework: 
  1. Finish your OPTIC analysis of the above image. DUE: Friday, 5/12.
  2. Read through pg. 117 of Persepolis by Monday, 5/15, and take reading notes using one of the graphic organizers.
Reminder: Mini-Memoir DEADLINE: Monday, 5/15.

05/10 Wed: Cloud Coach Email #5

posted May 10, 2017, 8:24 AM by Genevieve Hollerich

Learning Target(s):
  • I can read and annotate the Week 5 Gateway Prompt. 
  • I can respond professionally to my mentor’s email. 
  • I can make sure I’ve included the monitor’s email address.
Entrance Instructions:
  1. Pick up the Week 5 Gateway Prompt on your way in. 
  2. Read it and circle any parts you find confusing. 
  3. Underline the specific things you should include in your email. 

Classwork: 
  • Share out Prompt annotations. Any questions?
  1. Check your school email account for an email from your mentor. 
  2. Read the email. 
  3. Select “Reply All” to respond. 
  4. In your response, you should answer any questions your mentor has asked as well as the questions in the Week 5 Gateway Prompt. You can also ask your mentor questions you have about goals or goal setting.
Before you hit “Send”:
  • Proofread and edit your email. It should be as professional as possible. 
  • Make sure you're sending your email to your mentor's General Mills address AND the Best Prep monitor email address or you won’t get credit for your email! 
Homework:
  • Finish yesterday’s OPTIC paragraph of conclusion. 
  • Read through pg. 93 of Persepolis by Thursday and take reading notes using one of your graphic organizers. When you’ve completed the graphic organizer, turn it in.

05/09 Tues: Define "analyze," Use OPTIC strategy to analyze an image

posted May 9, 2017, 1:25 PM by Genevieve Hollerich   [ updated May 11, 2017, 12:33 PM ]

Learning Target(s):
  • I can define “analyze.” 
  • I can learn the OPTIC strategy of analysis. 
  • I can use OPTIC to analyze an image for meaning. 
Entrance Instructions:
  1. Turn in yesterday's reading homework. 
  2. Pick up an OPTIC handout on the way in.
  3. Read the following word and definition: analyze: to examine closely; to break down and identify the parts of a whole and examine their relationships to one another; to discover or reveal something from this examination.
  4. With a partner, paraphrase the definition and identify a time that you have analyzed something.
Classwork:
  • Share out paraphrased definitions for "analyze." Choose one and write it down at the top of your OPTIC handout. 
    • analyze: to look closely at something and break it down so that you can figure it out.
  •  Review OPTIC, a strategy for analyzing visual texts such as cartoons. 

OPTIC - Analyzing and Writing About Visual Texts

Overview - Write a brief overview of the image: in one complete sentence, what is this image?

Parts - Key in on all of the parts by noting any details that seem important. This can be anything: color, figures, textures, scenery, groupings, shadings, patterns, numbers, etc. Be objective; state what you see, not what you think it means. (You’ll get to analyze and discuss meaning later.)

Text/title - Use the title to clarify the subject of the image. Consider both literal and metaphoric meanings. What does the title suggest? Is there any text in the image—a caption, or words in the image itself? What does this text suggest?

Interrelationships -
Specify the interrelationships in the image. In other words, think about how the parts are related, both to one another and the image as a whole. Consider how the parts come together to create a mood or convey an idea or argument. What do the parts mean? (This is where you get to analyze.)

Conclusion – Use your “notes” from O, P, T, and I to write a fully developed conclusion paragraph of analysis about the image as a whole. What is the image of? What parts do you see? What does the title/text mean? How do all the pieces come together to create a message? What’s the message? Think about what the artist, photographer, creator, or designer might be trying to capture and convey, and what ideas, arguments, or implications this image presents.

  • Practice using OPTIC to analyze the political cartoon below. Use the OPTIC handout to record your observations and analysis.


Homework:

  1. Finish your OPTIC paragraph of analysis (back of the handout).
  2. Read through pg. 93 of Persepolis by Thursday and take reading notes using one of the graphic organizers. When you’re done filling in the graphic organizer, turn it in.

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