MATHEMATICS

UPDATED: 1/31/2013

MATHEMATICS COURSE PROGRESSIONS
The Mathematics Department seeks to serve students by assisting each student in developing the knowledge and skills he or she will find useful in further courses of study or in real life situations. Most freshman enter this progression at the Algebra I level.  Students that have not previously taken honors math courses may enter the honors math program through an application process.

The Standards for Mathematical Practices from the Common Core:
  1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 
  2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. 
  3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. 
  4. Model with mathematics. 
  5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 
  6. Attend to precision. 
  7. Look for and make use of structure. 
  8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
In order to meet the varying demands, needs and abilities of our students and to address all of the Performance Indicators in the Common Core, the Mathematics Department offers a wide range of courses. We strongly encourage students to take a math course in each of their four years in high school since the single greatest predictor of success in college or technical college courses is completion of four years of high school mathematics. Three credits in mathematics are required for graduation.

NOTES:

Honors courses are available in Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus and Calculus. Students need the approval of the mathematics department to enroll in honors courses.

Algebra 1 - Part 1 and Algebra 1 - Part 2 together are worth two (2) math credits and combined are the equivalent of Algebra 1.

Entry into any course is dependent upon successful completion (recommended C or better) of the prerequisites listed for that course in the Program of Studies. When a student earns a grade of (D or lower) in a math course, that student is inadequately prepared for success in the next math course.

Students who are having difficulty succeeding in their math course may change from one course to another, with the permission of the teachers involved in the change. This change must take place by the 5th week of the course. Any course changes after that time will be done only if initiated by the teacher of the course. No changes will be made without the permission of the parent.

All students should plan to leave MDIHS with at least the equivalent of Geometry, which may mean that some students will take 4 or more math courses. In recent years, it has become increasingly important for most students to complete Algebra 2. Most technical schools require completion of Algebra 2 and the State Assessment Tests now include Algebra 2 skills. 


Admission to Honors math classes can happen in several different ways:
  1. Students who take Algebra I in 8th grade take the Form 9 exam in the spring of their 8th grade year. If the test performance meets high school requirements, the 8th grade teacher recommends admission and the student has high grades in Algebra I, then he/she may enroll in Honors Geometry.
  2. Students who have taken Accelerated or College level math courses at MDIHS may apply for honors math classes. In order to be accepted, the student must complete an application form, have high grades in their previous math classes, have scores of 3 or 4 on all performance indicators on common assessments, score at least 80% on an exam that covers essential Algebra skills and receive a letter of acceptance.

In order to remain eligible for Honors math classes, students must maintain a B- or better average in the honors level math class and have scores of 3 or 4 on all indicators on common assessments. Readmission to honors math classes requires a written application and a letter of acceptance from the math department. An Algebra skills test may also be required.

Honors courses are available in Geometry, Algebra 2, Pre-calculus and Calculus.  Students need the approval of the mathematics department to enroll in honors courses.


COURSES

MATH LAB
Open to: 9-12
Credit: 0

The Math Lab is a supported study hall for any student enrolled in a math class.  Students will receive support for their math class, including reviewing prerequisite skills, reteaching new concepts, and assistance on homework.  Students in enrolled in the Math Lab are expected to use study hall time to complete their math homework and have the Math Lab supervisor check their work before moving on to homework for other courses.  In addition, students may use the Math Lab to practice for the PSAT, SAT, or the Accuplacer Exam.  Elective credit can be attained for students who go above and beyond the requirements for their math course.  


ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT
Open to: 9
Credit: Up to 2 credits 
Prerequisite: Recommendation by teacher - see criteria for recommendation (below)

Academic Development is a full-year course designed to improve specific academic skills and support first-year students as they transition into the high school learning environment. The class will focus on reading, writing, and mathematics, with one-half of the time being devoted to building basic (algebra readiness) mathematics skills, and the other half aimed at improving reading and writing skills. Study skills relating to success in all academic subjects will also be taught. Some of the work completed in this class will support the 9th-grade English/Social Studies curriculum.

Academic Development class will be team taught. It will replace the Foundations of Applied Math class as well as Resource Study Hall, where appropriate. Students will earn elective credit and the grade will be P/F.

Eligible students will meet at least two of the following criteria:
  1. Recommendation by 8th-grade teacher in cooperation with high school guidance counselor, and/or Special Educator.
  2. Pattern of not meeting state/district learning standards on standardized tests in reading, writing, and math.
  3. Pattern of not meeting state/district learning standards on classroom, school-wide, and/or district-wide assessments in reading, writing, and math.
  4. Attendance issues which have been severe enough to result in gaps or low academic skill levels.
  5. Lack of study skills which prevents success across academic subjects. 

Common Core State Standards are from the 5-8 grade strand


ESSENTIAL ALGEBRA
Open to: 9, 10
Credit: 1
Prerequisite:  Completion of Academic Development or recommendation of 8th grade teacher

In this course, students will focus on the essential skills needed to be successful in Algebra 1.  The course will begin by building on number sense, computation skills and reviewing pre-algebra skills.  Once students are proficient in these prerequisite skills, they will advance to the Algebra 1 standards listed below.  Student progress will be assessed from class participation, assignments, classroom activities, common assessments, notebooks, quizzes and tests. Students will examine the question, “How can we describe phenomena using algebraic models?” Upon successful completion of this course all students will meet the essential standards for Algebra 1.  Some students may continue on to Algebra 1, Part 2; however, most students will continue to Applied Geometry and Math 11/12 to meet the graduation requirement for mathematics.

Essential Standards:

  • Interpret the structure of expressions; write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.
  • Create equations that describe numbers or relationships.
  • Understand solving equations as a process of reasoning and explain the reasoning; solve equations and inequalities on one variable.
  • Represent and solve equations and inequalities graphically.


ALGEBRA I – PART I

Credit: 1
Open to: 9, 10, 11
Prerequisite: Recommendation of eighth grade math teacher or successful completion of Academic Development.

In Algebra 1 - Part 1 and Part 2, students will learn Algebra 1 concepts. This two-part Algebra course is divided into two credits and is studied over two semesters so that students have more opportunities to do “hands on” activities, to review previous math topics, to practice new skills and to allow for spiraling of new concepts. In Part 1, students will learn about variables, applying formulas, solving word problems with variables, solving linear equations, graphing linear equations with 2 variables and probability. Student progress will be assessed from class participation, assignments, classroom activities, common assessments, notebooks, quizzes and tests. Students will examine the question, “How can we describe phenomena using algebraic models?” Students will frequently be required to complete assignments outside of class time. After completion of Algebra 1-Part 1, students will need to complete their algebra 1 study with Algebra 1-Part2. The curriculum and instructional materials used in Algebra 1-Part 1 and Part 2 are the same as those used in Algebra 1.

Essential Standards:
  • Interpret the structure of expressions; write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.
  • Create equations that describe numbers or relationships.
  • Understand solving equations as a process of reasoning and explain the reasoning; solve equations and inequalities on one variable.
  • Represent and solve equations and inequalities graphically. 

ALGEBRA I - PART II
Credit: 1
Open to: 9, 10, 11
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 1 - Part 1 or approval of the Learning Area Leader

Students in Algebra 1-Part 2 will continue the study of Algebra 1 concepts that they started in Algebra 1-Part 1. They will explore these concepts through both “hands on” activities and traditional exercises. They will learn more about solving linear equations, graphing linear relationships, inequalities, systems of equations, exponents and powers, exponential equations, square roots and quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring and functions. Student progress will be assessed from class participation, assignments, classroom activities, common assessments, notebooks, quizzes and tests. Students will examine the question, “How can we describe phenomena using algebraic models?” Students will frequently be required to complete assignments outside of class time. After completion of Algebra 1-Part 2, students will be prepared to take Geometry or Applied Geometry.

Essential Standards:
  • Interpret the structure of expressions; write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.
  • Create equations that describe numbers or relationships.
  • Understand solving equations as a process of reasoning and explain the reasoning; solve equations and inequalities on one variable.
  • Represent and solve equations and inequalities graphically.


ALGEBRA I
Credit: 1
Open to: 9, 10
Prerequisite: Recommendation of 8th grade math teacher

In this course students will learn to solve problems with one and two variables, to solve equations with the variables raised to the first or second power, to graph equations and inequalities and to do some probability problems. Students will be required to use algebraic symbols and formulas to carry out operations on equations for solving problems on daily homework assignments. The question, “How can phenomena be described algebraically?” will be explored. Student progress will be assessed by tests, quizzes, projects, common assessments, class participation and assignments. Students should expect to have out of class assignments frequently. Students satisfactorily completing Algebra 1 should be academically prepared to successfully complete Geometry and Algebra 2.

Essential Standards:
  • Interpret the structure of expressions; write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.
  • Create equations that describe numbers or relationships.
  • Understand solving equations as a process of reasoning and explain the reasoning; solve equations and inequalities on one variable.
  • Represent and solve equations and inequalities graphically.


ACCELERATED ALGEBRA I
Credit: 1
Open to: 9
Prerequisite: Substantial exposure to Algebra 1 in 8th grade, but not enough to qualify for Honors Geometry and recommendation of 8th grade math teacher

Students enrolled in this course will learn algebra in greater depth than in the regular Algebra I course. In this course students will learn to solve problems with one and two variables, solve equations with the variables raised to the first or second power, and to graph linear and quadratic equations and inequalities. Students will also do some probability problems. Students will be required to use algebraic symbols and formulas to carry out operations on equations for solving problems on daily homework assignments. In this class, students will explore the question, “How is algebra used to model phenomena?” Student progress will be assessed by tests, quizzes, projects, common assessments, class participation and daily assignments. Students should anticipate out of class assignments on most days. Students successfully completing Accelerated Algebra 1 should be academically prepared to successfully complete Geometry and Algebra 2. Some students completing this course may be advised to apply for admission to Honors Geometry and Honors Algebra 2.

Essential Standards:
  • Interpret the structure of expressions; write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.
  • Create equations that describe numbers or relationships.
  • Understand solving equations as a process of reasoning and explain the reasoning; solve equations and inequalities on one variable.
  • Represent and solve equations and inequalities graphically.


GEOMETRY
Credit: 1
Open to: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Algebra 1 or Algebra 1-Part 2

In this geometry course, students learn using a discovery approach, which encourages them to identify the properties of geometry by observing, investigating and forming their own conclusions. Concepts are first introduced visually, then inductively. Some of the work in class is done in cooperative groups. The question, “How are patterns used to discover properties of geometry?” is central to the course. Students in this course are required to have a compass, straightedge, protractor and scientific calculator. In addition to using these traditional tools, students will explore geometric ideas using the computer program, Geometer’s Sketchpad. Students will learn about inductive reasoning, angles, triangles, quadrilaterals, circles, coordinate geometry, perimeter, area, volume, transformations, networks, congruence, similarity and trigonometric relationships. Student progress will be assessed through daily assignments, quizzes, tests, projects, in-class group work, common assessments and class participation. Student notebooks are necessary in this class for recording definitions, results of investigations and conjectures. Students completing this course should plan to take Algebra 2.

Essential Standards:
  • Experiment with transformations in the plane; understand congruence in terms of rigid motions.
  • Prove geometric theorems.
  • Understand similarity in terms of similarity transformations; prove theorems involving similarity.
  • Define trigonometric ratios and solve problems involving right triangles.
  • Understand and apply theorems about circles.
  • Use coordinates to prove simple geometric theorems algebraically.
  • Explain volume formulas and use them to solve problems. 

APPLIED GEOMETRY
Credit: 1
Open to: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Algebra 1 - Part 2

In this geometry course students will study geometry at a slower pace to completely understand complex concepts. Students will learn in a discovery approach, identifying the properties of geometry by observing, investigating and forming their own conclusions. Much of the work in class is “hands on”; some work is done in cooperative groups. The question, “How are patterns used to discover properties of geometry?” is central to the course. Students in this course are required to have a compass, straightedge protractor and a scientific calculator. In addition to using these traditional tools, students will sometimes explore geometric ideas using the computer program, Geometer’s Sketchpad. Students will learn about inductive reasoning, angles, triangles, quadrilaterals, circles, coordinate geometry, perimeter, area, volume, transformations, congruence, similarity and trigonometric relationships. The class indicators of progress will be daily assignments, quizzes, tests, projects, in-class group work, common assessments and class participation. Student notebooks are necessary in this class for recording definitions, conjectures and class notes. Students completing this course may choose to take Algebra 2.

Essential Standards:
  • Experiment with transformations in the plane; understand congruence in terms of rigid motions.
  • Prove geometric theorems.
  • Understand similarity in terms of similarity transformations; prove theorems involving similarity.
  • Define trigonometric ratios and solve problems involving right triangles.
  • Understand and apply theorems about circles.
  • Use coordinates to prove simple geometric theorems algebraically.
  • Explain volume formulas and use them to solve problems.


HONORS GEOMETRY
Credit: 1
Open to: 9, 10
Prerequisite: Formal application and acceptance to this course is required. Students eligible for application include those who have completed Accelerated Algebra I with a grade of B or higher, Algebra 1 with a grade of A- or higher and satisfactory completion of an entrance exam, or with a score of 80% or higher on Form 9 placement test and recommendation by the 8th grade teacher. (A student who took Algebra I in the 8th grade and who does not meet the prerequisites for this class will be advised to take Accelerated Algebra I.)

Modeling with Geometry: Students in this course will learn definitions, theorems and postulates associated with geometric figures in one, two, and three dimensions. They will develop and apply formulas involving size and shape of geometric figures and right triangle trigonometry. Students will be required to prove theorems, construct various geometric figures and solve algebraically for the numerical solutions to problems involving measurements of polygons. Students will also investigate geometry concepts using the Geometer’s Sketchpad software package. Students explore the question, “How can geometric concepts help us describe and explain real phenomena?” The class indicators of student progress will be tests, daily assignments, class participation and common assessments. Students in this class should anticipate out of class assignments every day. At the end of this course, students will be prepared for Algebra 2. Students who meet the prerequisites for the honors program should enroll in Honors Algebra 2.

Essential Standards:
  • Experiment with transformations in the plane; understand congruence in terms of rigid motions.
  • Prove geometric theorems.
  • Understand similarity in terms of similarity transformations; prove theorems involving similarity.
  • Define trigonometric ratios and solve problems involving right triangles.
  • Understand and apply theorems about circles.
  • Use coordinates to prove simple geometric theorems algebraically.
  • Explain volume formulas and use them to solve problems.

MATH 11/12

Open to:  11, 12
Credit:  1
Prerequisite:  Completion of an Algebra 1 Course (Essential Algebra 1, Algebra 1 Part 1 or Algebra 1) and Geometry

This course is designed for older students who need a third math credit.  In this course, students will continue to work on their algebra skills, covering topics such as solving and graphing linear inequalities, systems of equations, exponential growth and decay, variation, and probability and statistics.  In addition, students will be given practice on arithmetic and other skills needed to be successful on the Accuplacer Exam, a college placement exam used by many community colleges.  Experiential learning may provide an introduction to personal banking and how math is used in local professions.  Essential standards for this course are the same as for Algebra 1, but students will look at more complex problems relating to these standards.

Essential Standards:
  • Interpret the structure of expressions; write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.
  • Create equations that describe numbers or relationships.
  • Understand solving equations as a process of reasoning and explain the reasoning; solve equations and inequalities on one variable.
  • Represent and solve equations and inequalities graphically.


ALGEBRA II

Credit: 1
Open to: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Algebra I with a grade of C- or above recommended and Geometry

In Algebra II, students will learn about direct and indirect variations, linear programming, systems of equations, matrices, functions (linear, quadratic and exponential), exponents and radicals, statistics, and trigonometry. Throughout the course, students will be using problem-solving, reasoning and communication skills. Scientific calculators are required and graphing calculators are occasionally used. Students will ask, “How can real life phenomena be modeled algebraically?” Progress in this course will be assessed through assignments, group work, common assessments, notebooks, lab activities, quizzes, tests, and class participation. Students should expect regular, daily work, to be completed outside of class. Students successfully completing Algebra 2 will be prepared to take Probability and Statistics or AP Statistics.

Essential Standards:
  • Interpret the structure of expressions; write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.
  • Perform arithmetic operations on polynomials; understand the relationship between zeros and factors of polynomials.
  • Understand solving equations as a process of reasoning and explain the reasoning; solve equations and inequalities in one variable.
  • Understand the concept of a function and use function notation; analyze functions using different representations.
  • Build a function that models a relationship between two quantities; build new functions from existing functions.
  • Interpret expressions for functions in terms of the situation they model.

HONORS ALGEBRA II
Credit: 1
Open to: 10, 11
Prerequisite: Honors Geometry with a grade of B or higher or Geometry with successful completion of an entrance exam and written approval of the Learning Area Leader. Formal application and acceptance to this course is required.

Honors Algebra II is an honors-level course in which students learn at a faster pace and in more depth than the regular Algebra II class. Students will study direct and indirect variations, recursive and explicit expressions, linear programming, systems of equations, matrices, functions (linear, quadratic exponential and logarithmic), exponents and radicals, statistics, and trigonometry. Problem-solving, reasoning and communication skills are emphasized throughout the course. Graphing calculators are used frequently. Students will ask, “How can real life phenomena be modeled algebraically?” Progress in this course will be assessed through assignments, group work, common assessments, lab activities, quizzes, tests and class participation. Students should anticipate daily out of class assignments. Students completing this course with a B- or better will be eligible to take Honors Pre-calculus, Probability and Statistics or AP Statistics. Students with a lower grade will be recommended for Probability and Statistics or AP Statistics.

Essential Standards:
  • Interpret the structure of expressions; write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.
  • Perform arithmetic operations on polynomials; understand the relationship between zeros and factors of polynomials.
  • Understand solving equations as a process of reasoning and explain the reasoning; solve equations and inequalities in one variable.
  • Understand the concept of a function and use function notation; analyze functions using different representations.
  • Build a function that models a relationship between two quantities; build new functions from existing functions.
  • Interpret expressions for functions in terms of the situation they model.

PRECALCULUS
Credit: 1
Open to: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Algebra II

Students in this course will explore topics in Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry.  Topics will include the linear and quadratic functions, polynomial functions, trigonometry of triangles, graphs of trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, exponents and logarithms.  Students will ask, “How can real life phenomena be modeled algebraically?” Students will be required to solve a variety of problems in the above topics. Assessment of learning will include daily assignments, projects and tests. Many of the applications will involve the use of a TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator; the purchase of a TI-83/84 is suggested, but not required. Students should anticipate frequent out of class assignments. This course is designed for students who are interested in continuing their study of mathematics. Students who successfully complete this course should be prepared for entry-level mathematics courses at most colleges. Students may take this course concurrently with Probability and Statistics, if scheduling allows.

Essential Standards:
  • Extend properties of exponents to rational exponents; use properties of rational and irrational numbers.
  • Interpret the structure of expressions; write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.
  • Perform arithmetic operations on polynomials; understand the relationship between zeros and factors of polynomials.
  • Understand solving equations as a process of reasoning and explain the reasoning.
  • Understand the concept of a function and use function notation; interpret functions that arise in applications in terms of the context; analyze functions using different representations.
  • Build new functions from existing functions.
  • Construct and compare linear and exponential models and solve problems.  
  • Extend the domain of trigonometric functions using the unit circle; prove and apply trigonometric identities.

HONORS PRECALCULUS
Credit: 1
Open to: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Honors Algebra II with a grade of B- or higher or Algebra II and Geometry with grades of A- or higher along with the following: completion of math honors application, satisfactory performance on algebra skills test and written approval of Learning Area Leader.

Honors Pre-calculus is an honors level course where students study linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. These functions will be presented in a variety of ways: verbally, geometrically, numerically, and analytically. Students will learn about the properties of functions, graphs of functions and practical applications of functions. In addition, students will be introduced to limits. Other topics may be covered as time allows. Students continue to explore the question, “How can real life phenomena be modeled algebraically?” The purchase of a TI-83/84 graphing calculator is highly recommended, but not required. Students will be assessed in a variety of ways including assignments, problem sets, tests, quizzes, notebooks and class participation. In all assessments, students will be expected to demonstrate their mastery of concepts mathematically and narratively. Students should expect a significant amount of work outside of class on a daily basis. Students successfully completing this course will be prepared to take Calculus.

Essential Standards:
  • Extend properties of exponents to rational exponents; use properties of rational and irrational numbers.
  • Interpret the structure of expressions; write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.
  • Perform arithmetic operations on polynomials; understand the relationship between zeros and factors of polynomials.
  • Understand solving equations as a process of reasoning and explain the reasoning.
  • Understand the concept of a function and use function notation; interpret functions that arise in applications in terms of the context; analyze functions using different representations.
  • Build new functions from existing functions.
  • Construct and compare linear and exponential models and solve problems.  
  • Extend the domain of trigonometric functions using the unit circle; prove and apply trigonometric identities.

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS
Credit: 1
Open to: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Algebra II

A New York Times headline reads, “For Today’s Graduate, Just One Word: Statistics”. We live in a world of digital data. The internet allows companies and organizations to constantly collect data, yet without people who are trained in analyzing and making sense of all of it, the information alone isn’t very useful. The growing consensus is that students who want an edge in the competition for top jobs need a foundation in statistics. Besides being among the most useful skills for high schoolers, data analysis is fun and interesting.

Probability and Statistics is an introductory course offered to juniors and seniors who have completed Algebra II. Students study four broad conceptual themes including:
  • Exploring data: Observing patterns and departures from patterns 
  • Planning of a study: Deciding what and how to measure 
  • Anticipating Patterns: Producing models using probability and simulation 
  • Introduction to Statistical Inference: Confidence intervals and z-tests 
Students will be required to solve a variety of problems in the above topics on assignments, projects, problem sets, tests, journals, and the final examination. Students in this class should anticipate daily out of class assignments. Since many of the applications will involve the use of a TI-83/84 graphing calculator, the purchase of a graphing calculator is strongly encouraged, but not required. This course is intended for college-bound students who are interested in taking a mathematics elective and in becoming well prepared for a college level statistics course.

Essential Standards:
  • Summarize, represent, and interpret data on a single count or measurement variable; summarize, represent, and interpret data on two categorical and quantitative variables.
  • Interpret linear models.
  • Understand and evaluate random processes underlying statistical experiments; make inferences and justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies.
  • Understand independence and conditional probability and use them to interpret data; use the rules of probability to compute probabilities of compound events in a uniform probability model.
  • Calculate expected values and use them to solve problems; use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS 
Credit: 1
Open to: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Algebra II

Students who enroll in AP Statistics should be prepared for the rigor required to learn all of the content necessary to perform well on the AP examination and to allow time for practice for this exam. In this course, students will explore advanced topics in statistics with emphasis on the study and collection of data, and the inferences one can make from such data. Throughout the course, students will explore the questions: “Do statistics lie?”, “How do we interpret statistics to become informed citizens?” and “How is the likelihood of different events determined?” Students study four broad conceptual themes including:
  • Exploring data: Observing patterns and departures from patterns 
  • Planning of a study: Deciding what and how to measure 
  • Anticipating Patterns: Producing models using probability and simulation 
  • Introduction to Statistical Inference: Confidence intervals and z-tests 
Students will be required to solve a variety of problems in the above topics on assignments, projects, problem sets, tests, journals, and the final examination. Students in this class should anticipate daily out of class assignments. Since many of the applications will involve the use of a TI-83/84 graphing calculator, the purchase of a graphing calculator is strongly encouraged, but not required. This course is intended for college-bound students who wish to satisfy a college requirement with the AP exam. This course will be offered in the fall semester, with AP exam practice sessions offered after school during the spring semester.

Essential Standards:
  • Summarize, represent, and interpret data on a single count or measurement variable; summarize, represent, and interpret data on two categorical and quantitative variables.
  • Interpret linear models.
  • Understand and evaluate random processes underlying statistical experiments; make inferences and justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies.
  • Understand independence and conditional probability and use them to interpret data; use the rules of probability to compute probabilities of compound events in a uniform probability model.
  • Calculate expected values and use them to solve problems; use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions.

HONORS CALCULUS
Credit: 1
Open to: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Honors Pre-calculus with a grade of B- or higher or completion of math honors application or an algebra skills test and written approval of Math Learning Area Leader, if grade is below B-.

Students taking Calculus will continue to look at functions, and how they change, from a variety of perspectives: geometrically, verbally, numerically, and analytically. This course will cover the four basic tenets of calculus; limits, derivatives, definite integrals and indefinite integrals. “Real life” applications of calculus will be studied throughout the course. A TI-83 or TI-84 calculator will be required as the technology is used to reinforce concepts. Students will be assessed on tests, quizzes, daily assignments, problem sets and notebooks. Organization will be imperative. This one semester, college level calculus class will cover the content of the AP curriculum. Students who are successful in this course will be encouraged to take Advanced Placement Calculus where the emphasis will be on preparing for the AP exam in May.

Essential Standards:
  • Students continue practicing essential standards learned in earlier mathematics classes

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS
Credit: 1
Open to: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Honors Calculus

Students who have successfully completed Honors Calculus will have the option of continuing their study of calculus and preparing to take the AP exam in May. It is important for students to realize that, after completing first semester calculus, they will have already learned the required material for the AP Calculus AB exam. This Advanced Placement course will have three main focuses: a continuation of advanced calculus topics, preparation for the AP exam and a project of the student’s own choosing. Completion of this course, along with the first calculus course will give provide students with the equivalent of a college course in calculus.

Essential Standards:
  • Students continue practicing essential standards learned in earlier mathematics classes