Honors Western Civ 2011-12


Western Civilization Honors--week of August 20: reading assignment with reading guide

posted Aug 18, 2012, 7:14 PM by Thomas Thompson   [ updated Aug 20, 2012, 11:08 AM ]

In the first unit we will learn about the majority of human history--the almost two million years during which humans evolved both physically and culturally during what historians have labeled the Paleolithic, Mesolithic and the Neolithic Ages.  We will learn about the importance of culture and its four elements:  control of environment, communication, cooperation, and the use of mind and spirit.  Of the greatest importance in human development is the agricultural revolution and its economic, technological, social and political consequences.
Download the first chapter from The West in the World, a pretty good college level textbook and read the following pages over the week:
Monday:  Read pages 4--8 about prehistory, the beginnings of agriculture during the Neolithic Age and the importance of the domestication of plants and animals
Tuesday:  Read pages 8 to 15 about the early civilizations of Mesopotamia.
Wednesday:  Read pages 15 to 27 about ancient Egypt.
And listen in class to more specific assignments about these pages.  Download the attachment that has reading guide questions that will help you as you read.  Take notes when helpful or appropriate for you to do so.  Use your judgement.

B block final tomorrow: Tuesday

posted May 23, 2012, 1:38 PM by Thomas Thompson   [ updated May 28, 2012, 3:55 PM ]

100 objective items, mostly matching, some identifications, a couple of pairs, and an essay.
See review sheet--it's helpful.
Watch powerpoint on fascism--a subject for one of essays--its appeal, how leaders took and kept power, the significance of the Spanish Civil War . . . (on most recent post)
Review John Locke, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Adam Smith and other Enlightenment thinkers--why the scientific revolution and the Enlightenment represent a turning point in western intellectual history.
Review the impact of the dual revolution (the French and the Industrial Revolutions) on western history, western society and culture.
Review the impact the experience of the first world war (and the peace conferences of Paris that followed) had on twentieth century history and culture (consider, too, the novel you are reading for Mr. Lippi's class.)

Relax, take a breath, do your best, and--most importantly--augment what you have learned this year by following current events.
  And consider continuing you cultural literacy this summer:

For AP U. S. history next year,  you may wish to read one of the following over this summer; all are well written and very readable:

David McCullough’s John Adams  (made into an HBO series)

Joseph Ellis’ Founding Brothers or American Creation (very interesting stories about the “founding fathers”)

Walter Isaacson’s Benjamin Franklin

Doris Goodwin Kearns’s No Ordinary Time   (Roosevelt’s White House during World War II)

And, finally, take the opportunity this summer to see the standing exhibit on European art at the Palace of Legion of Honor, not far from the Golden Gate Bridge.   And if you want to see Paris (now, in the 20’s and in the Belle Epoque) see Midnight in Paris, Woody Allen’s new film

World War I    Gallipoli,  Lawrence of Arabia, 

Between the Wars    Doctor Zhivago,  Reds,   Empire of the Sun,   Swing Kids,

World War II     Casablanca,  Mrs. Miniver,  Saving Private Ryan,  Bridge on the River Kwai,  Enigma,

     Schlinder’s List,  Das Boat,  Midway;  Tora, Tora, Tora;  Band of Brothers (HBO series);  Patton; 

     Enemy at the Gates;  (Guns of Navarone and The Great Escape are pretty entertaining)  Atonement

Post-War period   The Best Years of Our Lives (my all time favorite film);  The Third Man;  Judgment at Nuremberg

Hopefully, you will find that black and white films with actual dialogue are pretty entertaining.



Study for final: outlines, final review sheet, tests, and attached powerpoints

posted May 22, 2012, 10:24 AM by Thomas Thompson

I have attached a number of powerpoints (some of which I will show in class tomorrow as a review). 

STUDY FOR THE FINAL--MAKE STUDY GROUPS--REVIEW OUTLINES!!!!

posted May 17, 2012, 12:15 PM by Thomas Thompson   [ updated May 28, 2012, 3:54 PM ]

Read and review the recent outlines on the Second World War and the Cold War.


May 14 and 15 for B and G:

posted May 14, 2012, 2:59 PM by Thomas Thompson

Take time to slowly reread the outlines handed out in class today--the challenges facing the democracies (Britain, France and Germany) between the wars; the rise of totalitarian regimes in the Soviet Union (communist) and in Italy (fascist), the nature of both ideologies; the rise of Adolf Hitler and Nazism in Germany during the 1930's, the reason for his success and the attitude of Britain and France to fascism in that decade.
Tomorrow's class will concern the road to war--World War II.  Read and think.  Learn as much as you can about the 20th century, a violent and turbulent one.
  (Be autodidacts!)

STUDY PACKETS ON WORLD WAR I AND RUSSIAN REVOLUTIONS AND READ BELOW AND

posted May 3, 2012, 8:17 PM by Thomas Thompson   [ updated May 8, 2012, 8:56 AM ]

1. Begin to read the recent outlines with care and mindfulness--recognizing trends, appreciating the significance of key persons, places, events and terms--getting the big picture--the growth of the responsive nation-state, attempts to deal with the problems caused by rapid social and economic changes wrought by the dual revolutions of the nineteenth century, the social divisions within the middle class . . .  the Eastern Question--the causes, conduct and consequences of the Crimean War (on the Concert of Europe, on Russia), the growing tensions in the Balkans due to nationalism and outside interests; the "Great Migration," the "new imperialism," its impact on non-Western peoples and cultures in Africa and Asia and the Pacific. 
Absorb and make connections with the world as you know it today from the media and from former classes.  Most of today's economic and political and diplomatic challenges have their roots in the events of the nineteenth century--the challenge of aging populations in European welfare states, the problems in the Middle East, in Africa, even in Afghanistan.
2. Take time to watch the attached powerpoints, especially the one on the English and French Belle Epoque.

Make connections between powerpoints and the outlines: 1. The Industrial Revolution 1780--1850  2. 19th Century Society 1800--1914  3. handouts on Industrial Revolution and Marxism (socialism, communism)  4. handout on revolutions of 1830's and 1848   5. Age of Realpolitik 1848--1871  6. Age of Mass Politics  7. The New Imperialism 1880--1914
Modern Currents stronger in the 19th century:  science and technology; accelerating industrialization and urbanization; the conquest of distance and time and the consequences; the growth of the size and influence of the middle class on culture and politics; the plight of the working class and new ideological differences; new social stresses and the response of the national states; the growth of suffrage and consequence; the challenge of new, powerful and upsetting ideas (Darwin, Marx, Freud . . .); competition, rather than cooperation--in society, in politics, in international affairs, for global influence, in military build-ups  . .); the impact of extreme nationalism, racism and anti-Semitism; new artistic and literary responses to these rapid social, economic and cultural changes; the growth of new media and public opinion; the new imperialism and its consequences on European relations and on non-Western cultures and peoples; growing militarism.


May 1, B block review and scroll down past G block notes, assignment

posted May 1, 2012, 11:47 AM by Thomas Thompson   [ updated May 1, 2012, 12:44 PM ]

Today in class, G Block covered the use of "blood and iron" by Bismarck's realpolitick in achieving the goal of German unification (all but Austria)--three wars, one with Denmark (1864), one with Austria (1866) and one with France (1870), the latter would leave a bitter legacy (one of the underlying tensions contributing to the Great War).
Today in class, G Block also stepped back a decade or so to examine the beginning of the end of the Congress of Vienna's Concert of Europe--the notion of collective security:  the Great Powers acting together to keep peace--the "most senseless war," the Crimean War (1854--1856) between Russia and an alliance of Ottoman Turks, Britain and France--the last "old fashioned war" and the first modern war due to railroad, iron clad steamships, better rifles and artillery, the use to the telegraph, the first war correspondents, first war photography, Florence Nightingale and modern nursing . . .  Russia lost and went through a major evaluation . . .the "Eastern Question" continued due to the declining Ottoman Empire, "the sick man of Europe"; the Balkans were becoming "powder keg of Europe."
Tonight, please download a Sage outline on the "Age of Mass Politics 1871--19145"  the expansion of democracy and suffrage and the consequences of mass politics--growth of liberal and socialist parties, the beginnings of the welfare state, internal divisions (left v. right) and so on.  Please read over and bring to class tomorrow.  items to highlight and to know: 

“Age of Mass Politics”

German Empire (Reich)

Kaiser Wilhelm I

Otto von Bismarck

Junkers

Kulturkampf

Catholic Center Party

Social Democratic Party (S.P.D.)

Wilhelm II

Third French Republic

Paris Commune

Dreyfus Affair

Emile Zola, “J’accuse!”

Conservative Party

Benjamin Disraeli

Liberal Party

William Gladstone

Reform Bill of 1867, “leap in the dark”

Reform Act of 1884

Fabian Society

Independent Labor Party

B block students:  review notes from "sage outline, "Mass Politics,"  most of which was covered in class today--see list above.

 

Emmeline Pankhurst

 “Irish Question”

Irish Home Rule

Ulster

Easter Rebellion

“Eastern Question”

“Sick Man of Europe”

Pan-Slavism

Congress of Berlin, 1878

Socialist Revisionism

anarchists

Alexander II

Emancipation Act, 1861

Mirs

Intelligensia

 “Autocracy, Orthodoxy, Russification”

pogroms

Theodore Herzl, Zionism





Untitled Post

posted Apr 30, 2012, 11:02 AM by Thomas Thompson   [ updated Apr 30, 2012, 7:31 PM ]

Today in class, B Block covered the use of "blood and iron" by Bismarck's realpolitick in achieving the goal of German unification (all but Austria)--three wars, one with Denmark (1864), one with Austria (1866) and one with France (1870), the latter would leave a bitter legacy (one of the underlying tensions contributing to the Great War).
Today in class, B Block also stepped back a decade or so to examine the beginning of the end of the Congress of Vienna's Concert of Europe--the notion of collective security:  the Great Powers acting together to keep peace--the "most senseless war," the Crimean War (1854--1856) between Russia and an alliance of Ottoman Turks, Britain and France--the last "old fashioned war" and the first modern war due to railroad, iron clad steamships, better rifles and artillery, the use to the telegraph, the first war correspondents, first war photography, Florence Nightingale and modern nursing . . .  Russia lost and went through a major evaluation . . .the "Eastern Question" continued due to the declining Ottoman Empire, "the sick man of Europe"; the Balkans were becoming "powder keg of Europe."
Tonight, please download a Sage outline on the "Age of Mass Politics 1871--19145"  the expansion of democracy and suffrage and the consequences of mass politics--growth of liberal and socialist parties, the beginnings of the welfare state, internal divisions (left v. right) and so on.  Please read over and bring to class tomorrow.  items to highlight and to know: 

“Age of Mass Politics”

German Empire (Reich)

Kaiser Wilhelm I

Otto von Bismarck

Junkers

Kulturkampf

Catholic Center Party

Social Democratic Party (S.P.D.)

Wilhelm II

Third French Republic

Paris Commune

Dreyfus Affair

Emile Zola, “J’accuse!”

Conservative Party

Benjamin Disraeli

Liberal Party

William Gladstone

Reform Bill of 1867, “leap in the dark”

Reform Act of 1884

Fabian Society

Independent Labor Party

 

Emmeline Pankhurst

 “Irish Question”

Irish Home Rule

Ulster

Easter Rebellion

“Eastern Question”

“Sick Man of Europe”

Pan-Slavism

Congress of Berlin, 1878

Socialist Revisionism

anarchists

Alexander II

Emancipation Act, 1861

Mirs

Intelligensia

 “Autocracy, Orthodoxy, Russification”

pogroms

Theodore Herzl, Zionism

 

Weekend assignment: make sure that . . .

posted Apr 27, 2012, 2:56 PM by Thomas Thompson

1. that you have taken the time to review (view and read) the powerpoints posted earlier.
2. that you have downloaded the "sage" notes on the force of nationalism
3. that this weekend you read the notes (pages 1--3) that introduce
the concept of realpolitik and
the causes, events and consequences of the Crimean War and
(pages 7--9) the issues, personalities and events part of the story of German unification, and
 the challenges to the Hapsburg Empire in the late 19th century.


I will be reading your research papers and hope to return them next week.

Weekend: Watch powerpoints--examine images and read text carefully--take time to think and connect

posted Apr 25, 2012, 1:25 PM by Thomas Thompson   [ updated Apr 26, 2012, 2:40 PM ]

Also
1. Take home test entitled "The Birth of Modern Currents:    The Industrial Revolution Creates Economic and
    Social Change" 
Write down the terms next to their definitions on pages 1, 2 and 3; circle the right answer to the multiple choice questions; Look over the essay questions on page 4 and write out the description or definition to each of the identifications in #6.
2. Download the document entitled "The Force of Nationalism--1848--1871" which covers the Crimean War, Napoleon III and the Second French Empire, the unification of Italy; of the unification of Germany; the pressure on the Hapsburg Empire.

B Block students should review page 3 (starting with III. France) through page 7 (ending with the unification of Italy).  Next Monday we will cover the story of German unification (pages 7 to 9) and the challenges to the Hapsburg Empire and begin to look at the "Eastern Question" by learning about the Crimean War 1855-56, the first modern war in several respects (pages 2 to 3) in this downloaded packet.  G block students should do the same over the weekend, unless they would rather preview than review.

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