Course Descriptions


ACCOUNTING

AC 105 Financial Accounting: 3 Credits

An introduction to the basic concepts and principles of financial accounting and the preparation and analysis of three basic financial statements: balance sheet, income statement, and the statement of cash flows. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MH 080.


AC 111 Entrepreneurial Accounting: 3 Credits 

This course will provide the student with an overview of business financial management. Emphasis is placed on financial statement analysis, management of cash flow, risk and return, and sources of financing. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret and apply the principles of financial management to their own entrepreneurial venture.


AC 201 Intermediate Accounting I: 3 Credits

Thorough examination of accounting theory, the accounting process, and the problems involved in the proper recording of transactions and the preparation of financial statements. A review of the accounting cycle; preparation and interpretation of advanced accounting statements using contemporary techniques; current standards underlying financial statements of business entities. Topics to be studied include working capital, current and non-current liabilities, and income determination. Prerequisite: AC 105.


AC 202 Intermediate Accounting II: 3 Credits 

Continuation of AC 201. Thorough examination of the practices employed in the development and use of financial statements to present an accurate and fair picture of operation results, financial position, and changes in financial status of business enterprises. Use of accounting information as a basis for decisions by users of financial statements and reports. Special areas to be studied include asset valuation and plant assets; long term debts; stockholder’s equity and surplus; correction of errors of prior periods; tax allocations, pensions, and leases. Preparation, analysis, and interpretation of financial statements are considered in detail. Prerequisite: AC 201.


AC 203 Managerial Accounting: 3 Credits

A study of cost and managerial concepts and their application to the planning and control of manufacturing and service firms. Topics include accounting for the production process; performance and productivity measurement; revenue and cost analysis for decision making. Financial statements, budget planning, control and cost behaviors are also evaluated. Prerequisite: AC 105.


AC 204 Accounting Information Systems: 3 Credits 

An accounting information system is designed to collect, record, store, and process data to produce information for decision makers. This course provides an introduction to modern enterprise Accounting Information Systems (AIS).The student will apply accounting information systems concepts and procedures utilizing practical hands-on applications utilizing computer software, case studies and research projects. Projects will be related to both development of current accounting information systems theory and practical uses. In addition to studying select business transaction cycles within AIS, the course will present current challenges within today’s modern accounting information systems such as information systems audit, cyber security and enterprise risk management and IT governance. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 6 credit hours in accounting and IST105.


AC 299 Accounting Internship: 3 Credits

A part-time participation in the business world offering students an opportunity to acquire practical experience and to test academic concepts. Students will engage in a minimum 140-hour internship in a job allied to their accounting specialization. Students are responsible for placement research, interviewing, and transportation to and from the work site. Students will be required to document their experiences in a written journal and will receive a performance evaluation from the employer. This opportunity is a partnership between the student, the employer, and the college. The overall goal is to produce talented and competent professionals. Students applying for the internship program must be matriculated in the Accounting program and have completed AC 105, AC 203, and AC 201 and must have maintained at least a “C” in all accounting courses, and have a 2.0 cumulative GPA.

 

AH 100 Observation Placement: 3 Credits 

Eighty hours of observation is provided for the pre-occupational therapy, or pre-physical therapy. This placement takes place in an occupational or physical therapy department that is affiliated with Manor. The placement is to include observation of and limited participation in the activities of the OT or PT department or chiropractic office. Course is offered by arrangement and may be taken in either the fall or spring semester by sophomore students in good standing.

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ART

ART 110 Drawing I: 3 Credits

This course introduces fundamental concepts in drawing with an emphasis on mark, line, gesture, contour, edge, value, form, perspective, overall composition and illusion of space.  Students will develop drawing skills, techniques, and aesthetic sensibilities related to artistic expression using a variety of mediums such as charcoal, pencil, and ink.  Emphasis will be placed on drawing from observation and studio work will include demonstrations and critiques. No Prerequisites.


ART 120 Painting I: 3 Credits

This course introduces fundamental concepts in painting with an emphasis on line, tone, composition, form, and perspective. Students will develop painting skills, techniques, and aesthetic sensibilities related to artistic expression using a variety of mediums such as oil and acrylic. Still life, landscape, and figure will be used as subject matter and studio work will include demonstrations and critiques. No Prerequisites.


ART 150 Digital Photography: 3 Credits

Digital Photography I is an introduction to digital photography and the techniques of computer based photographic manipulation. This course will provide the student with a fundamental technical and aesthetic knowledge of digital photography. Aesthetics, history and the science of traditional photography are included as well as practical and critical approaches to the art of photography. The first few weeks will emphasize the basic mechanics of digital photography with increasing focus on aesthetic development as the semester progresses. Principles and techniques of camera use, image downloading and manipulation, printing and presentation will be covered. Investigation of visual criteria will be stressed as an integral part of the digital photographic process. No Prerequisites.



BIOLOGY

BI 100 Survey of Biology: 3 Credits

This course is designed as a science elective for students not intending to enter science careers. It includes a brief look at all major areas of biology, including chemistry, cells and genetics; taxonomy, evolution and ecology; current topics such as genetic engineering and cloning; and life processes in simple to complex organisms. (Three hour lecture/no laboratory)


BI 101 Biology I: 4 Credits

A comprehensive study of fundamental concepts of living organisms, emphasizing the molecular and cellular organization of life. Primary emphasis is given to basic unit of life, the cell. Topics include basic biochemistry, cell structure and function including reproduction, energy in biological systems, genetics and gene expression. The scientific method and evolution are introduced. Laboratory investigations are designed to correlate and clarify lecture topics. Lab studies include eukaryote comparisons, cellular processes, molecular biology and genetics. (Three hours lecture/ two hours laboratory) Prerequisite: Placing out of EN 065 or successfully completing EN 065. “C” or better in high school biology or completion of prep biology.


BI 102 Biology II: 4 Credits

This course is a continuation of BI 101 and focuses on comparative vertebrate anatomy, physiology and development. Taxonomic, evolutionary and ecological concepts are presented and current challenges in these areas are discussed. Laboratory includes a systematic survey of plants and animals and stresses the taxonomic relationships of living organisms, with frequent comparisons to humans. (Three hours lecture/two hours laboratory) Prerequisite: BI 101.


BI 105 Survey of Anatomy and Physiology: 3 Credits 

Survey of the fundamental principles applying to the anatomical systems of the human body and physiological processes involved in the functioning of the body. Emphasis on the homeostatic mechanisms which enable the body to function as an integrated system. (Three hour lecture/no laboratory)


BI 106 Science of Nutrition: 3 Credits

Fundamental concepts of diet with analysis of food intake and nutritional values are studied. Structure of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins, and minerals are presented and related to healthy diet planning. Students will be encouraged to analyze personal eating habits through discussion, written food diary assignments and diet analysis using Diet Analysis Plus software. Nutrition Connection software will also be used. Current DVDs and research may supplement lectures. A registered dietician will teach the course. (Three hour lecture; no laboratory)


BI 107 Environmental Issues: 3 Credits

A study of ecology with special emphasis on the impact of humans on the environment. Following an introduction to biological and ecological concepts, contemporary environment issues will be examined. Topics include population growth and world hunger, pollution problems and their effects, resource depletion, and viable alternatives to environmental problems. Political, ethical, and social implications will also be discussed. Field trips will be planned, depending on season and time during which course is offered. (Three hour lecture/no laboratory)


BI 109 Topics in Forensic Science: 4 Credits

Crime scene investigations are studied by incorporating real-life forensic applications to a variety of science topics. Cellular biology, anthropology, biotechnology, genetics, physics and chemistry concepts will be addressed in both lecture and laboratory as applied to modern day forensics. This course is designed for the non-science major. (Three hour lecture/two hour laboratory)


BI 201 Anatomy and Physiology I: 4 Credits 

An introduction to the structure and function of the major organ systems of the human body. After a brief examination of cellular and tissue structure, the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems are studied. Laboratory will include experiments in cell physiology, microscopic review of prepared tissue slides, practical study of human bones, and dissection of rat and sheep organs. (Three hour

lecture/two hour laboratory) Prerequisite: BI 101.


BI 202 Anatomy and Physiology II: 4 Credits 

A continuation of Biology 201. Sense organs, endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems of the human body are discussed.  Laboratory will include dissection of the cat and demonstration of physiological principles. (Three hour lecture/two hour laboratory) Prerequisite: BI 201.


BI 203 Microbiology: 4 Credits

This is a basic course in the principles of microbiology. Special emphasis is placed on the medical and clinical aspects of microbiology. This includes cultural, morphological, biochemical, and microscopic characteristics of bacteria. Mycology, virology and parasitology are also covered along with the disease process of each organism. In the laboratory isolation, cultivation and microscopic examination of bacteria, fungi and parasites will be covered. Additionally, the student will become familiar with different staining techniques, media preparation and antibiotic sensitivity tests. (Three lecture hours/three laboratory hours) Prerequisite: BI 101.


BI 204 Medical Terminology: 3 Credits

Medical Terminology is an exploration of common medical language with a focus on understanding word components and the clinical usage in terms of relation to human body systems. (Three hour lecture; no laboratory)


BI 206 Microbiology for Veterinary Technicians: 3 Credits 

This is an introductory course in applied microbiology with emphasis on organisms affecting animal species. General microbiological concepts and principles are covered in lecture and laboratory. Topics include: taxonomy, biology of micro-organisms, pathogenic organisms, mycology, virology, bacteriology, immunity, zoonosis, public health, anti-microbial sensitivity testing, sterilization, disinfestation, safety and the microbiology of milk. Laboratory exercises are used to supplement lecture material while stressing safety and procedural techniques using materials to culture and

identify organisms. (2 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory) Prerequisite: VT 111.


BI 210 Special Studies in Biology: 1 Credit

Course Objective: This course would be designed to give the student greater depth of knowledge in a particular topic of interest in any of the biological sciences, including but not limited to general biology, ecology, anatomy and physiology, or microbiology. For example, Allied Health Transfer- Pre Radiologic Science or Allied Health Transfer-Pre Nursing majors might complete a paper or a project on the physiology or pathophysiology of selected organ systems of the body with which they foresee themselves working. Students interested in ecology could visit a recycling plant and write a paper on the subject. The student would complete a minimum of 30 hours of work. Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Director


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BUSINESS

BA 101 Introduction to Business: 3 Credits 

This course is an introduction to the concepts, principles, language, activities and philosophy of business in the world today. Topics include economic systems, business ownership, management, marketing, accounting, finance, and contemporary business trends.


BA 102 Principles of Marketing: 3 Credits

This course explores the entire marketing process. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the 4 Ps--product, place, price, and promotion, and practical applications of the marketing process. Prerequisite: BA 101 or BA 107.


BA 103 Legal Environment of Business: 3 Credits 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the law of business from the perspectives of both consumers and businesses. An overview of the American legal system will be followed by discussions and analysis of the law pertaining to contracts, commercial transactions, employment, business organizations and property. Examination of how government regulates business will also be covered.


BA 107 Introduction to International Business: 3 Credits 

This course is an overview of the global business environment It examines the influences of economic, political, legal, and cultural forces on international business operations. Other topics include regional economic integration, global competition, foreign direct investment, and current international business trends.


BA 111 Business Math: 3 Credits

This course applies students’ interpretation of basic mathematical concepts to common business usage covering such topics as percentages, interest, trade, bank and cash discounts, payroll, time value of money, and business loans; linear and quadratic equations with applications involving supply, demand, revenue, cost, profit and break-even points.


BA 113 Introduction to Entrepreneurship: 3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the responsibilities of the entrepreneur and the unique concepts of business ownership. Students will benefit from case studies and practical entrepreneurial experiences, including interaction with successful regional entrepreneurs. Topics include the importance of business planning and the role and nature of entrepreneurship as a mechanism for creating new ventures.


BA 114 Introduction to Sport Management: 3 Credits 

This course will provide students with an overview of the diverse and expanding field of sport and recreation as well as a comprehensive look at the basic organizational structures found in the industry. Students will examine managerial concepts and processes specific to the field.


BA 116 Entrepreneurial Business Analysis: 3 Credits 

This course examines the entrepreneur’s role in the global economy as an exploiter of opportunities. Topics include the creative search for ideas, the innovation process, and the opportunity analysis to screen for the best ideas. Learning activities cover the decisions needed to transform an idea into a business opportunity. Topics covered include the common sources of ideas, the environmental scan, creating opportunities from ideas, quick industry analysis, competitor scan, decision making principles and analytical techniques to screen opportunities for commercialization potential.


BA 202 Business Communication: 3 Credits 

This course provides students with a solid communication base so they are able to communicate effectively on both personal and professional levels. Students will build their skills through practical applications which include writing and editing professional correspondence, composing and delivering oral presentations, and preparing employment documents. Prerequisite: EN 101.


BA 203 Principles of Management: 3 Credits 

This course focuses on the basic managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Students are introduced to the foundations of management thought and managerial processes that lead to organizational effectiveness. Emphasis is placed on the discussion of cur- rent issues of management practice, analyzing case studies, and problem-solving in contemporary

organizations. Prerequisite: BA 101 or BA 107.


BA 204 Human Resources Management: 3 Credits 

This course provides an overview of the current issues, policies, and practices central to human resource management such as staffing, training and development, performance management, and EEO regulations. The emphasis of the course is on every manager’s responsibilities in managing human resource issues. The elements of the HRM process will be covered through the use of case studies, exercises, and articles. Prerequisite: BA 101 or BA 107.


BA 209 Organizational Behavior: 3 Credits 

This course explores attitudes and behaviors of individuals and groups in organizations, covering the practical side of human relations--predicting, understanding and influencing the outcomes of interactions. Topics include goal setting, motivation, leadership and decision making, as well as contemporary and emerging topics such as ethics, power, mentoring and workforce cultural diversity. Prerequisite:

BA 101 or BA 107.


BA 210 Compensation and Benefits: 3 Credits 

This course defines the legal and regulatory factors affecting employee benefit programs (and the management of these programs), job descriptions and earnings, labor market and relations, as well as economic factors.   Prerequisite:   BA 101 or BA 107.


BA 212 International Marketing: 3 Credits

An investigation of marketing practices in the global marketplace. Focus is on the impact of economic, political, cultural, and legal differences on marketing strategy.

Prerequisite: BA 102.


BA 213 Sales Strategies: 3 Credits

Selling is a component of the marketing mix. This course examines effective selling techniques, consumer behavior, planning and sales strategies, and sales management. Prerequisite: BA 102.


BA 214 Sports Marketing and Promotion: 3 Credits 

Students will study the organizational structures, leadership styles and culture of different sport and recreational organizations and be introduced to how those businesses are promoted and marketed.  Prerequisite: BA 102 & BA 114.


BA 216 Principles of Finance: 3 Credits

A fundamental introduction to finance theory and practices used by business organizations. Topics include capital budgeting, evaluation of a firm’s financial performance, time value of money, stocks and bonds. Prerequisite: AC 105.


BA 219 Internet Marketing and E-Commerce: 3 Credits

This course will explore the Internet as a marketing channel and how Internet marketing can support an organization’s marketing strategy. Topics include online business models, online marketing strategies, and the online customer experience. Prerequisite: BA 102.


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COMMUNICATIONS

CM 101 Introduction to Mass Media: 3 Credits 

This introductory survey course will explore the history of mass media and its influence in the United States through the study of books, newspapers, magazines, radio, sound recordings, television, film, and the web. Students will also examine news, advertising, and public relations, which interact with and rely on the mass media to function. Current topics and trends in the mass media field will be discussed. Examination of media ethics and effects will help the student become responsible and aware consumers of media.


CM 102 Mass Media Practice: 3 Credits

This course will provide a closer look at the divisions within mass media, with attention to print and electronic journalism, public relations, and advertising; as well as an overview of the characteristics and writing styles of each. Hands-on practice of written and oral communication required of media professionals will give each student an opportunity to experience these careers and help the student choose the communications track that he/she wishes to pursue.


CM 103 Introduction to Journalism: 3 Credits

In CM 103 students will learn the fundamentals of journalism, including reporting, interviewing, hard news writing, and feature writing, as well as discussing journalistic ethics and responsibility. Much attention will be paid to improving students’ writing styles and developing interviewing techniques. The Associated Press style of writing will be used. Students will put their skills to work by writing articles covering campus events and personalities.


CM 104 Introduction to Public Relations: 4 Credits 

CM 104 is an introduction to the theory and application of public relations.  Students will discover the objective and purpose of public relations. They will learn about its function within organizations, its impact on publics, and its role in society. Emphasis is placed on the responsibilities of a public relations practitioner and the necessity of organization, evaluation, planning, and preparation. The course will also address the ethics of public relations practice and the preparation of basic written public relations documents.


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CHEMISTRY

CH 101 Fundamentals of Chemistry I: 4 Credits 

This course introduces the International System of Units (SI); concepts of matter; atomic theory; periodic table and periodicity; structure of compounds; chemical nomenclature; calculations/stoichiometry; chemical equations. (Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory). Prerequisites: Placement in College Level Math. “C” or better in high school chemistry or completion of prep chemistry.


CH 102 Fundamentals of Chemistry II: 4 Credits 

This course is a continuation of Fundamentals of Chemistry I. Gas laws; liquids and solids; water; solutions; acids, bases, and ionic equations; oxidation-reduction equations; chemical equilibria; organic and biochemistry fundamentals. (Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory). Prerequisite: CH 101.


CH 201 Organic Chemistry I: 4 Credits

This course is an introduction to the chemistry of carbon compounds and of structural organic chemistry, including nomenclature and fundamental theoretical concepts. The mechanisms of addition, substitution and elimination reactions of aliphatic compounds are discussed. An important underlying theme is the relationship of molecular structure to the reactivity of organic compounds. An introduction to the use of spectroscopy to determine molecular structure is also included. (Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory). Prerequisites: Chemistry 101 & 102.


CH 202 Organic Chemistry II: 4 Credits

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 201. Mechanisms of aromatic electrophilic substitution reactions of benzene and its derivatives and of nucleophilic addition reactions of carbonyl compounds are discussed. Reactions of carbonyl compounds and carboxylic acid and their derivatives are presented. Name reactions such as Friedel-Crafts alkylation and acylation, Witting, Hell-Volhard-Zelinski, and Michael reactions and Claisen condensation are discussed. The importance of the relationship of structure to reaction mechanism is presented in terms of concepts such as electron delocalization, acidity-basicity, nucleophilicity, aromaticity and oxidation-reduction. Students are encouraged to compare and contrast many aspects of these reactions and their mechanisms. (Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory) Prerequisites: Chemistry 101 and 102, Chemistry 201.


CH 210 Independent Study in Chemistry: 1 Credit 

This course is designed to give the student greater depth of knowledge in a particular topic of interest in any area of chemistry that may be useful in their area of concentration. For example, Allied Health Transfer-Pre Science majors might explore topics in organic chemistry. The student would complete a minimum of 30 hours of work. Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Director.


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CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice: 3 Credits

This course will provide students with an introduction and overview of the United States criminal justice system. Study will include the differences between criminal, civil, and social justice, what constitutes a crime, law enforcement, policing strategies, the judicial system, sentencing strategies and correctional practices.


CJ 102 Criminology: 3 Credits

This course will examine crime patterns and trends through an exploration and evaluation of the definition of crime, causes of crime, theories of criminal behavior, and characteristics of criminals and victims.


CJ 201 Juvenile Justice: 3 Credits

This course will provide a general overview of the various activities and decisions involved in the processing of young criminal offenders. Examination of the justice system specially designed to handle children, consideration of the many stages in the system, and considerations of issues in juvenile justice policy formulation. (Prerequisite: CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice).


CJ 202 Policing in America: 3 Credits

An introduction to the study of law enforcement in the United States, this course examines both the history and evolution of policing, police practices and procedures, police-community interaction and relations, and the legal and ethical issues faced by police officers. (Prerequisite: CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice)


CJ 204 Criminal Practice and Procedure: 3 Credits

This course will explore criminal liability on both misdemeanor and felony levels. Study will also include examination of each stage in the criminal justice system, from arrest through post-trial motions, sentencing and appeal. Constitutional questions integral to the practice of criminal law will also be considered. (Prerequisite: CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice).


CJ 210 Corrections: 3 Credits

This course will examine theories of punishment as they relate to the various treatment and rehabilitation policies and practices that affect offenders in institutional and community settings. In addition to various forms of incarceration, parole and probation, students will explore offender education programs, institutional and community drug treatment programs, boot camps, house arrest, intensive supervision, work release, and community work service. (Prerequisite: CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice)


CJ 218 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice: 3 Credits

This course will investigate the causes and legal consequences associated with different types of violence and social unrest that impact the United States criminal justice system including child abuse and neglect, domestic abuse, elder abuse and neglect, gang violence and hate crimes. Case studies, analysis of existing laws and policy debate will provide a realistic picture of how the criminal justice system deals with these issues. (Prerequisite: CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice)


CJ 299 Criminal Justice Field Experience: 3 Credits

This course is especially recommended for those students who wish to work in the criminal justice field immediately following graduation. Students will be given the opportunity to observe and gain practical experience through a 100 hour supervised placement in a community criminal justice agency or on a criminal justice research project. (Prerequisite: CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice and CJ 102 Criminology and completion of at least 30 Manor credits or permission of the Program Director)


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DANCE

DAN 130 Hip Hop Dance Technique I: 3 Credits 

Hip Hop Dance Technique I will teach students the fundamental techniques, vocabulary, movement principles, and body control of hip hop dance. In addition the course will teach the history, culture, and musical influences surrounding the hip hop community. This powerful, energetic class will focus on musicality and rhythm as well as learning choreography and developing self-expression. Students will immerse themselves in various hip hop styles such as locking, popping, krumping and dancehall with an emphasis on footwork and body isolations.



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DENTAL HYGIENE

DH 101 Preventive Oral Health Care I: 4 Credits 

This course introduces the student to the dental hygiene process. Fundamental concepts, assessment skills and preventive techniques are emphasized. Principles of communication, education and motivation provide a firm foundation for patient education. The laboratory component of this course provides the student with hands-on experience in learning and applying instrumentation techniques utilizing manikins and student partners. Related skills including dental unit operation and patient and operator positioning strategies are also addressed. (Three hours lecture/7 hours laboratory) Prerequisites: CH 101; this course is open to students enrolled in the Dental Hygiene

program.


DH 102 Preventive Oral Health Care II: 5 Credits 

This course focuses on transition into clinical practice. Development of clinical skills continues with consideration of periodontal assessment and treatment planning and the introduction of ultrasonic instrumentation, polishing pit and fissure sealant application, instrument sharpening procedures and pain control techniques. Students are also familiarized with the scope of dental specialty areas and common procedures performed in prosthodontics, endodontics, oral surgery, pedodontics and orthodontics. In the entry level clinical component of this course, the student applies principles and techniques learned in didactic and pre-clinical laboratory courses to actual clinical practice. Students render dental hygiene services to patients in a clinical setting. Assessment, diagnosis and planning skills are cultivated, as well as basic instrumentation skills. (Three hours lecture/8-9 hours clinic) Prerequisites: This course is open to students who have attained a passing grade of “C” or better in all attempted dental hygiene didactic courses, and a “Pass” in pre-clinic laboratory.


DH 103 Oral Radiology: 3 Credits

This course introduces the student to radiological technology to assure that dental professionals who expose patients to radiation for diagnostic purposes meet radiological health standards. Emphasis will be placed on radiation physics, biological effects of radiation, function of dental x-ray equipment, quality and interpretation of x-ray films and darkroom techniques. Students will be taught techniques for producing dental radiographs of acceptable diagnostic quality. Technical skills will be developed on manikins before students demonstrate competence in a clinical setting. (Two hours lecture/two hours laboratory.) Prerequisites: CH 101. This course is open to students enrolled in the Dental Hygiene Program.


DH 104 Oral Histology and Embryology: 2 Credits

This course provides the student with an overview of the development and function of cells, tissues and organs on both the macroscopic and microscopic levels. Embryonic development of the head and neck and the morphodifferentiation of the face and oral structures is presented. The emphasis of this course is to familiarize the student with the parts of oral histology and embryology that are pertinent to clinical dental hygiene practice. Prerequisites: This course is open to students who have attained a passing grade of “C” or better in all attempted dental hygiene didactic courses and a “pass” in pre-clinic laboratory.


DH 106 Dental Anatomy: 2 Credits

This course will provide the student with a comprehensive study of the form, function, and characteristics of the human dentition and supporting structures. Eruption sequence of the primary and permanent dentitions, as well as the occlusion and position of individual teeth will be reviewed. Students will learn pertinent terminology as it relates to dental anatomy. Various activities and exercises will be utilized in the course to enhance the student’s knowledge. (Two hours lecture.) Prerequisites: CH 101. This course is open to students enrolled in the Dental Hygiene Program.


DH 107 Dental Materials: 2 Credits

This course introduces the student to materials used in dental practice. Lectures, demonstrations, readings and laboratory activities will assist the student in developing an understanding of the properties, uses and manipulation of amalgam, composite resins, cements, impression materials, gypsum products, waxes, bleaching materials, porcelain and gold. Physical and biological properties will be emphasized and clinical applications will be shown in the laboratory portion of the course. (One hour lecture/2 hours laboratory) Prerequisite: CH 101. This course is open to all students enrolled in the Dental Hygiene Program.


DH 108 Oral Pathology: 2 Credits

This course presents a study of disease processes occurring in the oral cavity. Diagnosis and treatment of common lesions, inflammation and repair and the immune system will be studied in depth. Oral manifestations and systemic problems encountered with neoplastic lesions will be examined as well as the distinction between benign and malignant tumors. Systemic diseases with significant oral manifestations and complications will be covered. (Two hours lecture) Prerequisite: This course is open to students who have attained a grade of “C” or better in all attempted dental hygiene courses.


DH 109 Periodontics I: 2 Credits

This course is designed to teach students about the normal, healthy periodontium in order to understand the various stages of periodontal disease and its treatment. A study of the clinical and histological characteristics of both the healthy and the diseased periodontium is presented. (Two hours lecture) Prerequisite: This course is open to students who have attained a grade of “C” or better in all attempted dental hygiene courses.


DH 110 Medical Emergencies: 1 Credit

This course will examine a variety of medical emergencies that can and do occur in the dental office. Students will learn basic information necessary to prevent, recognize and manage medical emergencies as an effective member of the dental health care team. (One hour lecture) Prerequisite: This course is open to students who have attained a grade of “C” or better in all attempted dental hygiene courses.


DH 201 Preventive Oral Health Care III: 5 Credits 

The lecture portion of this course focuses on advanced treatment planning, dietary analysis and counseling, and further consideration of pain control techniques. The management of patients with developmental, medical, physical, sensory and psychological impairments is discussed with emphasis on normalization of care, adaptation of oral care techniques and access to care. In intermediate level clinic, students continue to integrate preventive, educational and therapeutic care as they treat patients in a clinical setting. Emphasis is on the expansion and refinement of skills through the treatment of patients with moderate to advanced periodontal involvement. (Three hours lecture/12 hours clinic) Prerequisite: This course is open to students who have attained a grade of “C” or better in all attempted dental hygiene courses, and a “Pass” in entry level clinic.


DH 202 Preventive Oral Health Care IV: 5 Credits 

Lecture, discussion and group activities will focus on ethical and legal issues and controversial topics relating to the dental hygiene profession. Alternative practice settings and job procurement strategies will be explored. In advanced level clinic, students continue to apply knowledge and skills learned in didactic and clinical courses. Emphasis is on efficiency and proficiency in all dental hygiene processes as students prepare for licensure examination and transition into private practice. (Three hours lecture/15 hours clinic) Prerequisite: This course is open to students who have attained a grade of “C” or better in all attempted dental hygiene courses, and a “Pass” in intermediate level clinic.


DH204 Head and Neck Anatomy: 1 Credit                                                                                                  

An in depth study of the head and neck is presented in this course. The focus will be on identification of important anatomical structures of all major systems in this region including, but not limited to: bones, muscles, blood vessel, nerves, etc. Prerequisites: DH101, DH103, DH106, DH107; For Dental Hygiene students only.

DH205 Local Anesthesia: 2 Credits

This course is a study of basic and current concepts in the administration of local anesthetics, systemic effects, and tissues diffusion.  Assessment of the patient's health, apprehension and pain threshold will be addressed in determining the indications and contraindications of pain control and alleviation.  Emphasis will be placed on the selection and administration of appropriate anesthetic agents and evaluation of proper techniques. (lecture/  lab) prerequisite: this course is open to students who have attained a grade "C" or better in all attempted dental hygiene  courses.

DH 209 Periodontics II : 2 Credits

This course is a continuation of Periodontics I. There is a strong emphasis on the different types of periodontal therapy and the reason for their use on periodontal involved patients. (Two hours lecture) Prerequisite: This course is open to students who have attained a grade of “C” or better in all attempted dental hygiene courses.


DH 212 Pharmacology: 3 Credits

Pharmacology introduces the hygiene student to the study of drugs and how they affect biological systems. This course will provide the student with a base of knowledge in the principles of pharmacology and the drugs used in the current therapy of disease states, as well as a solid foundation in the terminology and vocabulary that is associated with pharmacology. Special emphasis is given to those drugs administered or prescribed in the dental practice, as well as those drugs whose actions, side effects, or interactions with other drugs may impact dental healthcare. (Three hour lecture) Prerequisite: This course is open to students who have attained a grade of “C” or better in all attempted dental hygiene courses.


DH 215 Community Dentistry: 2 Credits

This course introduces the student to the role of dentistry and dental hygiene practice as it relates to community-based oral health promotion and prevention approaches. Students are introduced to health education methods, basic principles of research and the socioeconomic, demographic and epidemiological trends of oral disease. The course provides an opportunity for an active partnership between various community groups and the student by completion of a major project. The student will apply the principles of community dental health as they develop and evaluate a community-based oral health presentation. (Two hours lecture) Prerequisite: MH 203; this course is open to students who have attained a grade of “C” or better in all attempted dental hygiene courses.


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EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

ED102  Intro to Early Childhood Ed.: Historical Foundations and Trends: 3 Credits 

This course presents an overview of the early childhood education field and profession. Parameters of the field are discussed, along with history, current research, relevant theories, curriculum variations, and projected trends for the future regionally, statewide, and nationally. This is a required course in the ECE program. Requires field work.


ED 104 Child Development 0 – 9: 3 Credits 

This course will provide an overview of the development of the typical child in the early childhood years, including birth to age 9. Students will gain an understanding of typical development in the early childhood years in the four developmental domains: physical, cognitive, communication and social/emotional. The work of theorists including Piaget, Vygotsky, Erikson, Gardner and Montessori, as well as recent research on brain growth and development, will be used to establish a theoretical framework for the understanding of the basis of early childhood practice. Students will learn how to apply the theories of early childhood development in the classroom setting to 

facilitate developmentally appropriate practices. Fieldwork required.


ED 105 Family Partnerships in Early Childhood: 3 Credits

This course will provide students with an overview of family systems and the central role families play in children’s development in the early childhood years, 0-9y. Students will gain an understanding of the legal rights of families within the general and special education process, as well as knowledge of laws relating to family and student confidentiality. Students will develop strategies for becoming cross-culturally competent, including identifying potential barriers to partnership and methods of maintaining meaningful, on-going communication with families regarding a child’s development and learning. Fieldwork required.


ED 107 Foundations of Middle Level Education: 3 Credits 

This course will provide an overview of the organization and philosophy of middle level education spanning grades 4 through 8. Students will gain an understanding of the implications of young adolescent development on program structure, curriculum design and assessment. Various instructional strategies used in middle level education will be presented, as well as current research and trends. Fieldwork required.


ED 110 The Early Childhood Professional : 3 Credits 

Students learn regulations, public policies, professional standards, and ethical guidelines for the early childhood profession. The student will become familiar with key state policies essential to the establishment and support of a comprehensive, cross sector early childhood professional development system. Professional communication, self- assessment and advocacy for one’s own personal and professional growth is a theme. We, as teachers, must help children develop into independent individuals who can control emotions, make positive decisions about their activities, learn effectively, and be aware of socially acceptable behaviors. This is an elective course in the ECE program.


ED 112 Early Adolescent Development: 3 Credits 

This course is designed to provide an overview of early adolescent development spanning grades 4 through 8. Students will gain an understanding of the major features of early adolescent development, including cognitive development, learning styles, memory, perception, and social cognition. Course content will emphasize the range of individual differences in young adolescents and implications for handling these differences in the context of the classroom. Fieldwork required.


ED 113 Introduction to Educational Technology: 3 Credits

This course will provide students with an introduction to educational technology as well as the latest research on important issues, trends, diffusion and adoption of technology in education. Students will be able to identify, develop and apply a variety of technological skills to meet the increasingly diverse needs of 21st century learners.


ED 119 Observation/Field Experience: 3 Credits 

Even the best of textbooks cannot prepare students for all the experiences they will encounter as early childhood teachers. The observation/field experience is intended to give students a more comprehensive education. Observing children is a tool that educators use for assessment. Assessment must focus on the whole child’s physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development. Observation is one of the oldest and best methods that educators use to learn about young children. The information collected is used in planning a developmentally appropriate curriculum. Through the field experience students are afforded the opportunity to become involved and active participants in a classroom setting. This is an elective course in the ECE program.


ED 204 Curriculum Planning and Assessment: Infant – Toddler: 3 Credits 

It is the responsibility of the infant and toddler caregivers to provide on demand care giving while attending to the routine needs of the children in their care. It is important to recognize the importance of routines and transitions in encouraging development and learning. Students will learn developmental theories and milestones of children from birth to age 3, as well as strategies to manage an effective child care program. The Infant Toddler Curriculum will center on maintaining a healthy, safe environment for all children. This is a required course in the ECE program. Fieldwork

required. Prerequisite: ED 102 & ED 104.


ED 208 The Inclusive Classroom: 3 Credits 

An introductory course which focuses on children with special needs from birth through early childhood and early adolescence. Students will learn basic terminology and characteristics of common special needs, be introduced to the diagnostic and assessment process and learn about laws governing the inclusion of children with special needs in public schools in the United States. This course is a required course in the Early Childhood and Middle Level Education programs. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: Completion of all required 100-level coursework.


ED 209 Teaching Math in Early Childhood: 3 Credits 

Students will gain an understanding of research-based best practices in math instruction for children from Pre-K-4th grade. Knowledge of early math foundations, including numbers and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability will be presented. Students will learn strategies for incorporating math knowledge throughout the curriculum in a developmentally appropriate manner in methods, materials and assessments. Pennsylvania’s learning standards for Pre-K through 4th grade, as well as national standards from the National Council for Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and National Association for Education of Young Children (NAEYC), will be used as a basis for establishing best practices. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: ED 102: Intro to ECE and ED 104: Child Development and placement into College Level Math.


ED 210 Integrated Arts in Early Childhood: 3 Credits 

Students will gain an understanding of research-based best practices in the creative arts, including music, dance, drama/theater and the visual arts. Students will learn strategies for planning developmentally appropriate experiences, in choosing appropriate materials and in assessing children’s knowledge and development in all areas of the creative arts. Pennsylvania’s learning standards for Pre-K through 4th grade, as well as national standards from the National Association for Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and Consortium of National Arts Education, will be used as a basis for establishing best practices. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: ED 102: Intro to ECE and 

ED 104: Child Development.


ED 212 Early Literacy Foundations: 3 Credits 

Students will gain an understanding of research-based best practices in language and literacy development of young children, PK- 4th grade. Knowledge of integrating reading, writing, speaking and listening across the curriculum through developmentally appropriate methods, materials and assessments will be emphasized. Pennsylvania’s learning standards for Pre-K through 4th grade, as well as national standards from the National Association for Education of Young Children (NAEYC) will be used as a basis for establishing best practices. Fieldwork required Prerequisites: ED 102: Intro to ECE and ED 104: Child Development and placement into EN 101.


ED 214 Teaching Science in Early Childhood: 3 Credits 

Students will gain an understanding of research-based best practices in science knowledge development in young children, PK-4th grade. Teachers of young children must have knowledge of science content, including physical, life and earth/space sciences, and ability to plan developmentally appropriate experiences using scientific thinking and inquiry. Pennsylvania’s learning standards for Pre-K through 4th grade, as well as national standards from the National Association for Education of Young Children (NAEYC) will be used as a basis for establishing best practices. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: ED 102: Intro to ECE and ED 104: Child Development and placement

in to College Level Math.


ED 221 Teaching Language Arts 4th – 8th: 3 Credits 

Students will gain knowledge of the major research, theories and instructional methods involved in teaching reading and language arts to grades 4 through 8. Emphasis will be placed on the interdisciplinary nature of language arts with the middle level curricular areas of science, math and social studies. Use of state and national standards will be included. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: ED 107: Foundations of Middle Level Education and ED 112: Early Adolescent Development and placement into EN 101.


ED 231 Teaching Math 4th – 8th : 3 Credits 

This course will present the research, theory and instructional strategies necessary for the successful teaching of math to middle level students. Students will become familiar with state standards for middle level math learning as well as standards presented by the National Council for Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: ED 107: Foundations of Middle Level Education and ED 112: Early Adolescent Development and placement into College Level Mathematics.


ED 241 Teaching Social Studies 4th – 8th: 3 Credits 

Students will become familiar with content inherent in teaching social studies to middle  level students through use of state standards and recommendations from national organizations. Various instructional strategies will be presented alongside current theory and research in the field. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: ED 107: Foundations of Middle Level Education and 

ED 112: Early Adolescent Development.


ED 251 Teaching Science 4th – 8th: 3 Credits 

This course will provide an overview of the content of science teaching at the middle level. State standards for science learning will be presented along with NCTM (National Council for Teachers of Mathematics) and NSES standards to provide a student’s with an appropriate knowledge base. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: ED 107: Foundations of Middle Level Education and 

ED 112: Early Adolescent Development and placement into College Level Mathematics.



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ECONOMICS

EC 101 Macroeconomics: 3 Credits

An introductory course in principles and problems of economics with emphasis on macroeconomics. Topics considered are the scope and nature of economics, ideology and structure of the American economy, national income and employment theory, business fluctuations, money and banking, fiscal and monetary policies, and economic growth.


EC 102 Microeconomics: 3 Credits

An introductory course in principles and problems of economics with emphasis on microeconomics. Topics considered are the scope and nature of economics, ideology and structure of the American economy, consumer choice theory, market structure, income distribution, and environmental economics.


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ENGLISH

EN 065 Reading and Writing Skills: 0/3 Credits

En065 Reading and Writing Skills is designed to develop the reading and writing skills of students to facilitate their success in college level courses. Specific activities in reading and writing will be  individually determined by diagnostic procedures and implemented accordingly. *** Students are required to take this course based on the placement test results.

EN 100 English Laboratory: 1 Credit

EN100 English Laboratory is a one credit class for students who need additional support in reading and/or writing. The instructor in the lab would work with the students in groups or individually, based on their reading and writing needs. The purpose would be to support those students in fulfilling the requirements of EN101.  Co-rerequisite: Students must be enrolled in EN101.


EN 101 Fundamentals of Composition I: 3 Credits

Instruction and practice in the basic forms of expository writing. Information Literacy Skills will be addressed. Prerequisite: Students must either pass or place out of EN 065 Reading and Writing Skills.


EN 101H Fundamentals of Composition I (Honors): 3 Credits 

For students who would like more in-depth study of readings and more intensive practice in writing, EN 101H will examine thematically linked topics from an interdisciplinary perspective. Reading and writing skills will be developed and refined to a higher level than in the traditional EN 101 course. Information literacy skills will be addressed. Prerequisite: Placement test or Permission of Honors faculty.


EN 102 Fundamentals of Composition II: 3 Credits

Further development of those expository writing skills mastered in EN 101 with emphasis on analysis, argument, and documentation. Information Literacy Skills will be addressed. Prerequisite: EN 101 Fundamentals of Composition I.


EN 102H Fundamentals of Composition II (Honors): 3 Credits

A continuation of the themes and skills developed in EN 101H, with an emphasis on analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Information literacy skills will be further developed and refined. Prerequisite:  EN 101 Fundamentals of Composition I. Honors eligible on Placement test or Permission of Honors faculty.


EN 103 Effective Oral Communication: 3 Credits

Introduction to oral communication, including interpersonal speaking, interview techniques, small group discussion, and speech preparation and delivery. Prerequisite: Placement into EN 101 Fundamentals of Composition I.


EN 201 Introduction to Literature: 3 Credits 

Introduces the student to the three major literary genres: Drama, Fiction (short stories and novels), and Poetry. The student will learn the characteristics that distinguish these literary genres and the important literary terms and techniques necessary to become a more sensitive, empathetic, astute, and critical reader. Prerequisite: EN 101 Fundamentals of Composition I.


EN 202 Introduction to Drama: 3 Credits 

The student will examine the conventions and the components of this literary genre, learning the key literary terms and techniques necessary for a full appreciation and understanding of drama. The plays examined will provide an historical overview of the development of drama from its classical origins to its contemporary experiments. Prerequisite: Placement into EN 101 Fundamentals of Composition I.


EN 203 Introduction to Poetry: 3 Credits

The student will examine the conventions and components of poetry, learning the key literary terms and analytical techniques necessary for a full appreciation and understanding of the poetic experience. The poems examined will provide a historical overview of the development of poetry from its classical origins to its contemporary forms. Prerequisite: Placement into EN 101 Fundamentals of Composition I.


EN 204 Introduction to Fiction: 3 Credits  

The student will examine the conventions and components of short stories and novels, learning the key literary terms and analytical techniques necessary for a full appreciation and understanding of fiction. The short stories and novels examined will provide an historical overview of the development of fiction from its origins to its contemporary manifestations. Prerequisite: EN 101 Fundamentals of Composition I.


EN 205 Advanced Composition: 3 Credits

Further development of those expository writing skills mastered in Fundamentals of Composition with an emphasis on writing style. Prerequisite: EN 102 Fundamentals of Composition II.


EN 207 Introduction to Film: 3 Credits

The student will examine film as an important and distinctive medium of expression. The course will trace the evolution of the art of film through analysis of technical, social, and artistic elements of historically important and contemporary films. Prerequisite: EN 101 Fundamentals of Composition I.


EN 208 Thematic Topics: 3 Credits

An examination of world literature from a thematic perspective. Themes such as “Literature and the Sexes” and “Literature and Philosophy” will be offered. Prerequisite: EN 101 Fundamentals of Composition I.


EN 210 World Literature: 3 Credits

World Literature introduces the student to the three major literary genres: Drama, Fiction, and Poetry as encountered in the literature of selected diverse cultures. Prerequisite: EN 101 Fundamentals of Composition I.



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EXPANDED FUNCTIONS DENTAL ASSISTING

DA 101 Chairside Procedures: 4 Credits

This course is designed to orient the dental assisting student to a new profession. An overview of its history, structure, professional organization, ethics and jurisprudence, areas of services, certification, and Pennsylvania State Dental Practice acts are included. Emphasis in this course will be placed upon preparing the student to assist the dentist in all operative procedures. Proper patient positioning, selection of instruments and materials for all operative procedures, as well as proficiency in four-handed dentistry, and proper asepsis and sterilization techniques according to blood borne pathogen and OSHA standards will be required for completion of this course. Students are required to purchase required uniform for program.(Three hours lecture/two hours laboratory).  No prerequisites.


DA 102 Clinical Experience I: 1 Credit

This clinical experience is designed to orient the student to working chairside within Manor’s Dental Health Center located at the College. Students are directly involved in patient care working as chairside assistants with the dentists and sophomore EFDAs. This course incorporates all aspects of dental assisting learned first semester and allows application of learned skills through hands on experience. Additional Fee: Radiation Badge.


DA 103 Principles of Radiology: 2 Credits 

This course will acquaint the student with the physical principles involved in the production and clinical use of X-radiation. Students will be made cognizant of radiobiological effects so that this knowledge can be used in understanding and implementing basic principles of radiobiological health. X-ray films and the various factors which influence the density, contrast, definition, and distortion of the radiographic image will be studied. Darkroom, film mountings, recognizing and understanding landmarks and interpretation will also be studied. (Two hours lecture). No prerequisites.


DA 104 Radiographic Techniques: 1 Credit 

In order for dental auxiliaries to produce diagnostically useful radiographs with minimal patient radiation exposure, it is essential that they possess a thorough understanding of extra oral and intraoral techniques. This course will provide students with two recommended techniques used in taking exposures utilizing both traditional and digital radiography, as well as those extraoral techniques as they pertain to dental procedures. Students must demonstrate proficiency in all techniques by passing required competencies to complete this course.  Additional Fee: Radiation Badge. Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade of “C” or better in DA 101 Chairside Procedures; DA 103 Principles of Radiology; DA 105 Practice Management; and DA 107 Dental Materials. (Assigned laboratory/clinical responsibilities.)


DA 105 Practice Management: 2 Credits

Learning the intricate functions that comprise and support a professional dental practice, including patient management, appointment scheduling, telephone techniques, insurance, financial statements, book keeping and inventory control. Use of technical communications, Dentrix computer program and fax machines are also highlighted. Included in the didactic portion are the application of skills learned within our on-campus dental facility. (Two lecture hours). No prerequisites.


DA 106 Dental Anatomy: 4 Credits

Emphasis is placed upon the form and function of both the primary and permanent dentitions, as well as the supporting structures. Students will be required to carve a select number of teeth from wax blocks, as well as perform other laboratory procedures that will reinforce learning. Stu- dents are required to purchase a typodont and carving instruments, which will also be used in DA 202, 203. 204. (Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory). Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade of “C” or better in DA 101 Chairside Procedures; DA 103 Principles of Radiology; DA 105 Practice Management; and DA 107 Dental Materials.


DA 107 Dental Materials: 3 Credits

Comprehensive knowledge of the physical and biological properties of the materials used in treating dental patients is pertinent in any practice. Lecture periods are reinforced with laboratory demonstrations and procedural experiences which are designed to instruct the student in the handling and preparation of materials used in dentistry. Students are required to purchase laboratory instruments for this course. (Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory) No prerequisites.


DA 108 Dental Specialties: 2 Credits

A series of lectures in different specialty areas of dentistry are given by instructor and guest speakers. Students will have the opportunity to visit a specialty practice. These lectures and visiting rotations will serve to instruct and reinforce knowledge needed to assist in specialty practices. Students are also required to research a specialty topic and do a classroom presentation. (Two hours lecture. Visiting rotations are assigned.) Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade of “C” or better in DA 101 Chairside Procedures; DA 103 Principles of Radiology; DA 105 Practice Management; and DA 107 Dental Materials.


DA 109 Medical Management of the Dental Patient: 1 Credit 

This course will introduce the students to pharmacology and how it relates to the dental profession. Students will also learn how to identify and treat medical emergencies in the clinical setting. Instruction will also include the handling of the medically compromised patient. CPR Certification is required to complete this course. No prerequisites.


DA 110 Oral Health Issues: 1 Credit

This course will introduce the students to oral health theories, oral disease control techniques, patient education skills, physical health correlations to dentistry, and dental emergencies. There are 14 seminars, 1 hour each in length held over the 15 week semester. Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade of “C” or better in all first semester courses.


DA 200 Clinical Experience II: 1 Credit

This experience is a continuation of Clinical Experience I. Students will provide dentist with chairside assistance, as well as begin preliminary patient care services. This course is offered in summer session only. (12 hours clinic per week/15 weeks = 180 hrs.). Additional Fee: Radiation Badge. Prerequisite: Satisfactory grade of “C” or better in DA 102 Clinical Experience I.


DA 201 Expanded Functions Seminar: 3 Credits 

This course provides didactic instruction for advanced operative procedures. It is taken in con- junction with DA 202 Expanded Functions Laboratory. Prerequisite: Satisfactory grade of “C” or better in all freshman-level courses. This course may also be taken by Certified Dental Assistants (CDA) that have been working within the dental profession for 3 or more years or graduates of an accredited Dental Hygiene program. Requirements also include that you be X-ray and CPR Certified. It is also required that you supply us with a transcript from an accredited institution showing a satisfactory grade of “C” or better in dental anatomy (equivalent to DA 106). Potential students are offered the option to take a challenge final examination in dental anatomy and receive a grade of 85 or better to be eligible for this course. This course is offered in summer session only (45 hours lecture).


DA 202 Expanded Functions Laboratory: 4 Credits 

This course includes practical procedures for performing reversible intraoral expanded functions as delegated to Certified EFDA Auxiliaries by the Pennsylvania State Dental Practice Act. It includes, but is not limited to, practical procedures in placement, condensing, carving, and finishing of amalgam and other restorative materials, placement and removal of rubber dams and matrices, and the fabrication of crowns, bridges, preliminary impressions, coronal polishing, sealants, and impressions for athletic appliances. This course may also be taken by Certified Dental Assistants (CDAs) meeting set requirements for EFDA Certificate Program, or Registered Dental Hygienists (RDHs). (135 hours laboratory. Additional fees: Materials and Optical Loops. Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade of “C” or better in all freshman-level courses.


DA 203 Clinical Experience III: 2 Credits 

This course will give the student the opportunity to gain experience in performing expanded functions chairside with direct supervision of dentist and faculty instructors. The entire experience will take place at Manor’s Dental Health Center with students being provided with restorative procedures in the role of direct patient care, enabling them to become active participating members of a dental health team within our facility. Additional Fee: Radiation Badge. (Twelve hours clinic per week = 180 hours). Students are required to show proof of passing the P.A. X-Ray Certification Exam by the end of the semester. Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade of “C” or better in all freshman-level courses.


DA 204 Clinical Experience IV: 3 Credits

A continuation of Clinical Experience III. (12 hours clinic per week = 180 hours). Additional Fee: Radiation Badge. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in DA 203 Clinical Experience III.


DA 205 Dental Sciences: 3 Credits

This course introduces the students to the dental aspects of many different disciplines. It includes histology, anatomy, neuro-anatomy/anesthesiology, pathology. Students are required to participate in a class wide campus education presentation. (Three hours lecture). Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of BI 105 Survey of Anatomy and Physiology or BI 101 Biology I and BI 102 Biology II.


DA 206 Externship Experience: 2 Credits

Students will be required to participate in a total of 90 hours in a private practitioner’s office. The purpose of such an experience is to build confidence in student’s ability to perform expanded functions and assume the responsibility of an EFDA. (90 hours clinic-off campus). Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in DA 203 Clinical Experience III.


DA250 Expanded Functions of Dental Assisting I: 5 Credits

This module provides classroom and laboratory instruction for advanced operative procedures, including amalgam, composite, and temporary procedures. Fabrication of temporary crowns, placement of matrices, wedges, ad rubber dams will also be covered.  Prerequisite: Must be in EFDA Certificate program


DA265 Expanded Functions of Dental Assisting II: 1 Credit

This course follows the completion of DA 250 EFDA I. Students are required to complete a total of 90 hours performing expanded duties.  All of these required hours will be spent at Manor’s Dental Health Center under the direct supervision of faculty dentist and clinical instructors. The student will be responsible for two clinic rotations (6 hours) per week for 15 weeks. The purpose of this experience is to strengthen and perfect the skills that were taught in DA 250 and allow the student to apply their skills to direct patient care. Any student wishing to take additional hours for the purpose of addition experience should speak to the instructor. Additional fees: Materials.

Prerequisite: DA250 EFDA I


DA270 Expanded Function Externship: 1 Credit

This course follows the completion of DA265 EFDA II.  The student will then be required to complete 20 hours of expanded duties in a private dental office under the direct supervision of a sponsoring dentist.  Time doing the required restorative procedures will be the time counted toward the 20 hours. All requirements and a total of 20 hours (doing restorative procedures) must be met.  This part of the internship usually takes about two months to complete.  The internship must be completed by the end of the fall semester to pass the course. Prerequisite: DA265 EFDA II

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HISTORY

HS 101 History of Western Civilization I: 3 Credits 

A survey of the development of western civilization from antiquity to the Renaissance and Reformation. Emphasis is placed on understanding the character of classical and medieval civilizations and man’s achievements during these stages of history.


HS 102 History of Western Civilization II: 3 Credits

A survey of the political, social, cultural, and economic development of Europe from the Reformation to the contemporary period with a focus on ideas, institutions, and forces that shaped European societies.


HS 103 History of the United States I: 3 Credits 

Examination of American History from its discovery to the Reconstruction (1865). A survey of the growth and development of the United States, its people, government, and institutions, from colonial times to the Reconstruction.


HS 104 History of the United States II: 3 Credits 

Examination of American History from the Reconstruction (1865) to the election of today’s President. A survey of the growth and development of the United States, its people, government, and institutions, from the Reconstruction to the election of today’s president.


HS 104H History of the United States II (Honors): 3 Credits 

This is an Honors course in American History. The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the main events and themes of American History from Reconstruction to the Modern Era. We will be focusing on four eras that helped to shape America to what it is today. The main areas will be: the Civil War, the Progressive Era, World War I and World War II, and the Cold War.


HS 105 Culture, Race, and Ethnicity in American History: 3 Credits 

A study of social and cultural currents in American history, historical experiences of America’s racial and ethnic groups, and attitudes toward race and ethnicity in the course of American History.


HS 105H Culture, Race, and Ethnicity in American History (Honors): 3 Credits 

This honors level course is an in-depth study of social and cultural currents in American his- tory, historical experiences of America’s racial and ethnic groups, and attitudes toward race and ethnicity in the course of American History. Prerequisite: Honors eligible on Placement test or Permission of Honors faculty.


HS 109 Women in America: 3 Credits

An historical approach to the study of the identity and role of women in America.


HS 110 History of Music: 3 Credits

An historical survey of the development of music in Western Civilization. The student will be introduced to the major musical styles and forms as well as to key musical terminology.


HS 111 History of Art: 3 Credits

An historical survey of major developments in architecture, painting, and sculpture in the world. The student will be introduced to the key terminology and techniques used to critically analyze and interpret art. The notion of what it means to be human will be explored historically through the analysis of individual objects.


HS 113 History of Ukraine I: Pre-Christianity to 1800: 3 Credits

An examination of the Geo-political, social, religious, cultural, and economic developments of Ukraine and its people from pre-Christianity to 1800


HS 114 History of Ukraine II: 1800 to the Present: 3 Credits

An examination of the Geo-political, social, religious, cultural, and economic developments of Ukraine and its people from 1800 to the present.


HS 115 History of the Ukraine III: Ukrainians in the Diaspora – 19th Century to the Present: 3 Credits

An examination of the phenomenon of emigration/immigration, focusing on the causes behind these actions and specifically reviewing the effects on the Ukrainian people.


HS 151 Global Patterns in the Making of the Modern World: 3 Credits

This course provides a thematic overview of broad patterns and changes that shaped and influenced civilizations and societies in a globalized context between 1450 to the present. Students will acquire an enhanced understanding of why and how change has occurred over time across early modern and modern societies and cultures in a globalized context, while seeking to understand and analyze the comparative contexts and cross-cultural relationships in which they emerged and developed globally.


HS 201 Thematic Topics: 3 Credits

A focused study of selected topics and issues in world or United States history. Prerequisite: Approval of Chairperson of Liberal Arts Division.

HS 210 The Making of Modern Philadelphia: 3 Credits

This course examines the historical evolution of modern Philadelphia (1854present) from the midnineteenth century to the present day. It specifically focuses on the “modernization” of Philadelphia and its place in American society, paying close attention to the following major events and developments: the act of consolidation (1854); the Civil War; the second Industrial Revolution; progressivism and ethnic assimilation; the great depression and second world wars; postwar urban planning and municipal government reform, race relations in the postwar period, and gentrification. Prerequisites: HS103 or HS104 or HS105


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INFORMATION SYSTEMS & TECHNOLOGY

IST 105 Introduction to Microcomputer Applications: 3 Credits 

In this course, students will learn basic Windows Operating Systems skills (including Core PC Hardware Components, Graphical User Interface, Local and Cloud File Management, Applications, Internet Browsers, Security, and key System Utilities), Google Email, Contacts, Calendar, and Drive applications, as well as introduction to Word Processing, Spreadsheet and Presentation applications.  Additionally, students will learn to create and convert documents between different format (Microsoft and Google apps).


IST 105 Honors Intro. to Microcomputer Applications (Honors): 3 Credits 

The Honors course is designed for students who have basic computer literacy skills and some familiarity with basic computer applications (word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation and database management programs). Laboratory course to provide students with: proficiency in Windows; skills for academic use of the Internet; review of basic functions of the applications; ability to implement each of these applications on web sites; ability to use Microsoft Outlook functions and features; knowledge of how data can be integrated among different Windows applications. Class exercises will focus on business situations, and instructional software packages will reflect current business usage. (Three hour lecture/no assigned lab periods - students need to allow time to complete lab assignments during open lab periods.) Prerequisites: Passing percentage on response to Honors Pretest indicating a minimum level of computer literacy.


IST 106 Intro. to Computer Technology and Programming Concepts: 3 Credits

This course will present students with basic concepts and terminology for computer hardware; software; networks; the Internet; mobile devices. Hands-on exercises will expose students to Microsoft Office applications (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access). Course will explore use of Internet for research and how to evaluate web sources. Students will also learn computational thinking and explore object-oriented programming concepts and techniques as they create movies and interactive games using ALICE software. Ethical issues will be discussed throughout the course.


IST 181 Operating and Application Systems: 3 Credits 

Install an operating system. Use OS for data and file management, backup, hard-drive maintenance functions, etc. Be familiar with general utility programs. Demonstrate familiarity with both stand-alone and network operating systems. Create, use and maintain system Learn functions and major components of systems software, and identify and define the important features of current operating systems. configuration. Change configuration parameters to optimize performance. Describe major features and functions of major categories of applications software (word processing, spreadsheet, database, browsers, e-mail, etc.). Use basic features of office productivity software. Demonstrate ability to learn a new feature in software package, and ability to learn a known application (such as word processing) in another vendor’s package. Install and test an application software package.


IST 203 Computer Graphics: 3 Credits

Specialized Graphics software will be used to design and compose computer graphics and 3-D animation as applied in print, digital video and web formats. Course will focus on theory and technique, using currently popular graphic and publishing software in addition to core learning goals including: Critical Thinking, Oral and Written Communications, Basic Principles (Competency in Discipline), Ethical Issues, Effective member of Team projects. Prerequisite: IST 105 or IST 106.


IST 205 Management Information Systems: 3 Credits 

This course explores current information management techniques. The system development life cycle is reviewed from initial needs analysis to final testing and implementation. Topics include benefit/cost analysis, data flow diagrams, top-down design, project management, techniques for planning program development (including modular coding, implementation, and maintenance.) Semester-long team case project will require student to apply system development life cycle concepts and techniques. Prerequisites: IST105 or passing grade on exemption test and BA101 or relevant business experience (approval of program director).


IST 206 Computer Forensics: 3 Credits

Based on the objectives of the International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists (IACIS) certification, this course prepares students to understand computer investigations and current computer fo- rensic tools. Various components of digital investigation and presentation of evidence as an expert witness will be explored. Application of these concepts for network security and control will be explored. Prerequisite: IST 105 or IST 106.


IST 210 Programming I: 4 Credits

An introductory contemporary computer programming language course to overview basic structured programming concepts, and provide students with the ability to write simple programs. Course will consist of lectures and hands-on exercises, with projects assigned to be completed using the Manor Student Network. (3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours) Prerequisites: IST 106.


IST 211 Programming II: 4 Credits

Detailed course in problem solving, expanding upon programming language skills acquired in CS 210. This course emphasizes concepts of system design, coding, testing and implementation and introduce object oriented programming concepts. Course will involve extensive coding using structured programming techniques. (3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours) Prerequisites: IST 210.


IST 212 Visual Basic Programming: 4 Credits 

Visual Basic will be used to create applications for the Windows operating system. Students will learn how to work with pre-built objects, graphics, enter commands, use variables and constants, use programming control structures and work with classes. The course will include an introduction to Active X  Data Objects and functions of the Application Programming Interface.(3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours) Prerequisites: IST 106.


IST 215 Database Management and Design: 3 Credits

Concepts, procedures, design, implementation and management issues of database systems, following database development life cycle. Stresses importance of needs analysis, requirements statement, and testing final product against initial requirements definition. Database management and security issues will be explored. Programming will be based on currently used business application database software, and SQL. Theory will be reinforced with projects to be completed using current business database software. Prerequisites: IST 105 and IST 205.


IST 217 Web Page Design and Development: 3 Credits 

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of World Wide Web home page design using the Extended Hypertext Markup Language (XHTML). Students will gain extensive hands- on experience creating Web pages using HTML tags for links, tables, forms, and incorporating images. Additionally, the course will present an introduction to basic web page scripting and web database interfacing. Quality design elements and style will be considered throughout the course. Prerequisite: IST 105 or 

IST 106


IST 218 Computer Networks: 3 Credits

An overview of computer communications, hardware and software requirements, protocols and applications (including terminal emulation, remote login and file transfer). Explore local area network topologies, installation and administration issues. Students will install server software and set up a working network during the course. Prerequisite: IST 105 or IST 106.


IST 219 Data Structures and Algorithms: 3 Credits 

Course provides an overview of data structures, including arrays, lists, stacks, queues, classes and trees. Abstract data types (ADTs) are also covered. Other topics included are: recursion, linked-lists, big-O notation, linear and binary searches, hashing and sorting.
Prerequisite: IST 210.


IST 299 Information Systems and Technology Internship: 3 Credits 

Students complete a minimum of 80 hours of computer-related work experience. Job functions can include programming, user support, network support and administration, web site development or other related responsibilities (subject to approval by the program director). Students are responsible for placement search, interviewing, and transportation to and from the work site. Students will be required to keep a journal of their hours, and employer feedback will impact student’s course grade. There will be six (6) sessions with the course instructor to discuss various work-related topics, including appropriate work dress and ethics, working in teams, managing your manager, how to deal with stress, etc. Prerequisite: Students must have successfully completed (C or better) at least nine credits in Information Systems and Technology courses.


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LAW (PARALEGAL)

LE 101 Introduction to Law and Para-legalism: 3 Credits

While exploring the structure of the American legal system and the principles of law which control the various legal specialties, this course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the role of the paralegal in today’s legal community and the ethical and professional responsibilities incumbent upon today’s legal assistants.


LE 102 Legal Research: 3 Credits

In this introduction to legal research, Manor’s in-house law library will serve as the workshop in which students will become familiarized with research materials, their applicability to various legal specialties and how they are used. In addition to fundamentals of legal research, students will be trained to analyze issues, a skill vital to paralegal competency.


LE 103 Civil Practice and Procedure: 3 Credits 

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of civil litigation both at the federal and state levels. All phases of the litigation process will be reviewed in detail with special emphasis upon pre-trial and trial procedures.


LE 104 Legal Writing: 3 Credits

Students will be instructed in interpretation and preparation of legal documents relevant to civil practice. The course will familiarize students with the language and format of legal documents through the use of a sample form book and through practical drafting assignments.


LE 201 Tort Litigation: 3 Credits

This course prepares students to assist attorneys, insurance companies and corporations in the practice of tort law. Relevant insurance practices and procedures will also be reviewed. The course covers primary legal principles of tort law as well as proper procedures for investigating such cases and preparing them for settlement or trial. Prerequisite: LE 101 or LN 101.


LE 202 Trusts and Estates: 3 Credits

Students will be introduced to the basic legal concepts which control wills, trusts and intestacy. The course includes a study of the fundamental principles of law applicable to each, as well as the organization and jurisdiction of the probate court, estate administration and fiduciary accounting. Commonly used estate and fiduciary forms and trust agreements will be analyzed. Prerequisite: LE 101.


LE 203 Real Estate Law: 3 Credits

This course will provide students with understanding of the basic concepts of real property law including ownership, sale, leasing, financing and government regulation of land, whether improved, with buildings or other features, or unimproved. Students will be introduced to various issues and terminology typically encountered in real estate practice. The course will also provide analysis of and instruction in the preparation of documents relevant to real estate practice. Prerequisite: LE 101.


LE 205 Family Law: 3 Credits

The course will introduce students to those legal concepts which relate to and control the family unit. Topics addressed include marriage, divorce, annulment, support, child custody, adoption, change of legal name, guardianship and paternity. Prerequisite: LE 101.


LE 206 Administrative Law: 3 Credits

Administrative agencies are often referred to as “the fourth branch of the government.” In this course the evolution of the administrative justice system will be examined. Students will become acquainted with the powers and procedures of a government agency and the legal assistant’s role in administrative grievance procedures and hearings will be reviewed. Prerequisite: LE 101 or LN 101.


LE 209 Law Practice Management: 3 Credits 

This course will cover the fundamentals of law office management and organization. Subjects covered include: basic principles and structure of management, employment opportunities for the paralegal, timekeeping and accounting systems, marketing issues, administrative and substantive systems in the law office, and law practice technology. Prerequisite: LE101 Introduction to Law

and Para-legalism.


LE 211 Contracts and Business Organizations: 3 Credits 

This course is intended to familiarize the student with the law of business from both a consumer and business point of view. A variety of business organizations will be studied as will the law pertaining to contract formation and the resolution of contract disputes. Prerequisite: LE 101


LE 212 Technology and Law: 3 Credits

This course will introduce students to technology and its relationship to law practice and the delivery of legal services. Emphasis will be placed on the use of technology in the areas of case management, document management, litigation support, on-line research, office management, and security issues.


LE 215 Employment Law: 3 Credits

This course will provide the student with an understanding of current legal issues in the area of employer/employee relations. Emphasis is placed on both federal and state regulations applicable to employment law. Areas covered will include the basis for the employer-employee relationship, pre-employment concerns, legal aspect of the employment relationship, discrimination issues, discrimination actions, termination of the employer-employee relationship, and ethical issue in employment law. Prerequisite: LE101 Introduction to Law or BA103 Legal Environment of Business.


LE 216 Evidence Law: 3 Credits

This course will provide students with an understanding of the rules of evidence as they apply, not only in the courtroom, but at every stage of litigation. Application of evidentiary rules to issues of communication, relevance, admissibility and privilege will be explored, as well as the ethical limitations imposed by the rules. Prerequisite: LE 101.


LE 217 Immigration Law: 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of U.S. immigration law. We will focus on immigrants, the various categories of non-immigrants, and the laws that must be followed to enter the U.S. from abroad or to gain permanent resident status and citizenship. Immigration law is a form-based practice and for this reason, we will review and discuss the various forms that are used in the immigration
process. Students will gain an understanding of the vocabulary used in immigration cases and learn how to prepare various types of immigration forms and of the issues confronting immigration clients. Prerequisite: LE 101.



LE 289 Legal Independent Study: Variable Credits 

A student who wishes to expand his/her knowledge of law in a particular subject area may participate in an advanced study or practicum relating to research, analysis, and application of legal doctrine or procedures. Weekly meetings with the advisor culminating in the preparation of a comprehensive, properly formatted, written legal analysis will be required. Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Director.


LE 299 Legal Internship: 3 Credits

The main objective of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to observe and gain practical work experience under the supervision of an attorney, legal assistant or other legal personnel. Weekly seminars with the course instructor will emphasize resume and cover letter preparation, job interview skills and job search strategies. Prerequisites: LE 101, LE 102, LE 103, and LE 104.




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MATHEMATICS

MH 080 Basic Mathematics: 0/3 Credits

This course concentrates on a review of operations with whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals, ratio and proportion and percentages. The students are expected to perform these skills with- out a calculator. Calculators are not permitted in this course. The following topics are introduced: algebraic equations, factoring techniques, linear and quadratic functions, formulas, exponents and graph and table reading. The emphasis is on application. This is a pass/fail course. Upon completion of the course, students either receive a S or U. S indicates that the student passed the course. U indicates that the student failed the course and must retake it. Upon successful completion of MH080, students must register for MH090.

MH 085 Developmental Math (ALEKS): 0/3 Credits

This course concentrates on a review of operations with whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals, ratio, proportion and percent.  The focus is on application. It introduces the beginning concepts of algebra and is appropriate for students with a weak background or no background in algebra. Topics include:  signed numbers, algebraic terminology, basic operations on algebraic expressions, exponents, solutions of linear equations and inequalities, simple factoring, simplification of radicals and word problems.  This version will be individualized to the student’s math needs by using the ALEKS program.  ALEKS is a web-based, artificially intelligent assessment and learning system.  This is a Pass/Fail course.  If a student earns a U, he/she must retake the course.  If a student receives an SP, he/she must take the course for an additional semester to complete the requirements.  If the student earns a S, he/she is qualified to register for courses whose prerequisite reads: Placement into College Level Math.


MH 090 Basic Algebra: 0/3 Credits

This is a first course in Algebra. It introduces the beginning concepts of algebra and is appropriate for students with a weak background or no background in algebra. Topics include: signed numbers, algebraic terminology, basis operations on algebraic expressions, exponents, solutions of linear equations and inequalities, simple factoring, simplification of radicals and word problems. It includes the use of a hand held calculator and provides a review of basic operations. This is a pass/fail course. Upon completion of the course, students either receive a S or U. S indicates that the student passed the course. U indicates that the student failed the course and must retake it. Passing this course qualifies a student to register for courses whose prerequisite reads: Placement into College Level Math.


MH 102 Technical Mathematics: 3 Credits

A math course designed to provide a mathematical base for technical and lab work involving systems of measurement, conversions, significant figures, calculations using scientific notation, formulae, equations, logarithms, exponents, radicals, ratio and proportion, percentages, graphing, reading and interpreting graphs, charts, tables, and statistics. Emphasis is placed on technical and lab applications and vocabulary. Prerequisite: Placement into College Level Math.


MH 103 College Algebra: 3 Credits

College algebra is a course in Introductory Algebra, including real-life applications and problem-solving techniques. The emphasis of the course will be on equations, polynomials, graphs, systems of equations, inequalities, rational equations, radicals, and quadratic equations. Prerequisite: Placement into College Level Math.


MH 104 Algebra & Trigonometry I: 3 Credits 

This course covers the real number system, imaginary and complex numbers. It explores polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions, their characteristics, graphs and applications. It develops the unit circle and the trigonometric functions with their applications. Students will use a graphing calculator. Prerequisite: Placement into College Level Math or successful completion of all developmental courses and a “C” in MH103.


MH 105 Algebra & Trigonometry II: 3 Credits

This course will cover exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, and graphs of trigonometric functions, basic identities, the sum and difference formulas, double-angle and half-angle formulas, solving trigonometric equations and the laws of sines and cosines.  Prerequisites: Placement into College Level Math.


MH 201 Calculus I: 4 Credits

This is a course in differential and integral calculus of functions in one variable. Specific topics covered are: graphs of functions, limits, differentiation and differentiation rules, chain rule, implicit differentiation, extrema on an interval, and the Mean Value Theorem, limits at infinity, area under a curve, antiderivatives, definite integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Every topic is presented geometrically, numerically and algebraically. Work in the computer lab is included in this course. Prerequisite: Placement into College Level Math, and high school level algebra and trigonometry.


MH 201H Calculus I (Honors): 4 Credits

This Honors level course covers the same topics as MH 201 but in more depth and with additional applications. A research project and class presentation is also required. The course covers differential and integral calculus of functions in one variable. Specific topics covered are: graphs of functions, limits, differentiation and differentiation techniques, extrema on an interval, the Mean Value Theorem, limits at infinity, area under a curve, antiderivatives, integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Every topic is presented geometrically, numerically and algebraically. Work in the computer lab is included in this course. Prerequisite: Placement into College Level Math, and high school level algebra and trigonometry.


MH 202 Calculus II: 4 Credits

This course is a continuation of MH 201 and includes the following: the fundamental theorem of calculus, applications of the definite integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, differentiation and integration of trigonometric functions, integration techniques and improper integrals. Work in the computer lab is included in this course. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in MH 201.


MH 202H Calculus II (Honors): 4 Credits

This Honors level course covers the same topics as MH 202 but in more depth and with additional applications. A research project and class presentation is also required. This course is a continuation of MH 201H and includes the following: the fundamental theorem of calculus, applications of the definite integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, differentiation and integration of trigonometric functions, integration techniques and improper integrals. Work in the computer lab is included in this course. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in MH201 or MH 201H.


MH 203 Statistics I: 3 Credits

This is a basic course in the principles and techniques of statistics. The course will explore descriptive and inferential statistics. Sampling techniques, classification of data, probability theory, measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, normal distribution, population parameters, testing hypotheses, and the law of large numbers are among the topics to be covered. The purpose of the course is to provide the fundamental concepts of applied statistics. Emphasis will be placed on understanding of the basic concepts. The course will balance methodology with contemporary application. Prerequisite: Placement into College Level Math.


MH 204 Statistics II: 3 Credits

This second course in statistics will broaden the student’s experience and understanding of principles, techniques and methods in statistical analysis. This course will extend the treatment of inferential statistics. The main thrust of the course is interpretation and analysis of data. Estimation of parameters, hypothesis testing, inferences from two samples, simple and multiple regression, multinomial experiments, analysis of variance, process control and non-paramedic methods are among the topics to be covered. Prerequisite: MH 203 with a grade of C or better, or permission of coordinator.


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MUSIC

MUS 115 The History of Rock: 3 Credits

The History of Rock provides an overview of the development of Rock and Roll music in the United States through the Twentieth Century from a historical perspective. Through various readings, audio and video samples, online discussions, and individual research, students will gain an increased understanding of Rock and Roll and its impact on culture, history, and the musical world.


MUS 130 College Choir I: 3 Credits

College Choir I focuses on choral music for men’s, women’s, and mixed chorus. The ensemble provides the fundamentals of artistic choral ensemble singing and foundation. Students participate in the preparation and production of a program of choral ensemble music. No previous musical training is required. 


MUS 13I College Choir II: 3 Credits

College Choir II focuses on choral music for men’s, women’s, and mixed chorus.  The ensemble provides and expansion of the fundamentals of artistic choral ensemble singing and foundation.  Students participate in the preparation and production of a program of choral ensemble music. No previous musical training is required


MUS 132 College Choir III: 3 Credits

College Choir III focuses on choral music for men’s, women’s, and mixed chorus.  The ensemble provides an intermediate level of artistic choral ensemble singing and foundation.  Students participate in the preparation and production of a program of choral ensemble music. No previous musical training is required. 


MUS 133 College Choir IV: 3 Credits

College Choir IV focuses on choral music for men’s, women’s, and mixed chorus.  The ensemble provides a more advanced level of artistic choral ensemble singing and foundation.  Students participate in the preparation and production of a program of choral ensemble music.  Pre-requisite: MUS 132 College Choir III


MUS 150 Class Guitar I: 3 Credits

Class Guitar I is a course designed to establish a basic understanding of the guitar as an accompanying and solo instrument. This course will introduce skills and essential rudiments for the guitar. Students will learn or improve their knowledge of standard musical notation as it applies to guitar repertory. Students will be introduced to the fundamental techniques of guitar playing, including strumming and finger-style techniques. Through repertory study students will also learn about the history and repertory of the guitar within both western and world cultures. No Prerequisites


MUS 151 Class Guitar II: 3 Credits

Class Guitar II is a continuation of skills that were acquired from enrollment in Class Guitar I. Students will build on their foundation of guitar knowledge and application as instrumental soloists and accompanists. From both a plectrum and fingerstyle approach, more advanced techniques will be presented and taught. Focus on appropriate scale fingerings, chord voicing, strumming patterns, and reading of musical notation is further explored. Through the study of various repertoires of different musical time periods and genres, students will increase their understanding of music in the guitar canon. Prerequisite: MUS 150

MUS 190 Instrumental Ensemble I: 3 Credits

Instrumental Ensemble I is a performance course for students who want the opportunity to participate in a musical ensemble setting. The course focuses on developing a basic technique and span of repertoire for various music instrumental students. This course is open to all students who possess a basic ability to play an instrument. The ability to read music is required. Students will be evaluated in the first class, and those who are not prepared for ensemble work will be advised to withdraw.


MUS 191 Instrumental Ensemble II:  Credits

Instrumental Ensemble II is a performance course for students who want the opportunity to participate in a musical ensemble setting. The course focuses on developing an advanced technique and span of repertoire for various music instrumental students. This course is open to all students who possess a basic ability to play an instrument. The ability to read music is required. Students will be evaluated in the first class, and those who are not prepared for ensemble work will be advised to drop the course. 

Prerequisite: MUS 190


MUS 192 Instrumental Ensemble III: 3 Credits

Instrumental Ensemble III is a performance course for students who want the opportunity to participate in a musical ensemble setting. The course focuses on developing an advanced technique and span of repertoire for various music instrumental students. This course is open to all students who possess a basic ability to play an instrument. The ability to read music is required. Students will be evaluated in the first class, and those who are not prepared for ensemble work will be advised to drop the course. 

Prerequisite: MUS 191


MUS 193 Instrumental Ensemble IV: 3 Credits

Instrumental Ensemble IV is a performance course for students who want the opportunity to participate in a musical ensemble setting. The course focuses on developing an advanced technique and span of repertoire for various music instrumental students. This course is open to all students who possess a basic ability to play an instrument. The ability to read music is required. Students will be evaluated in the first class, and those who are not prepared for ensemble work will be advised to drop the course. 

Prerequisite: MUS 192


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PHILOSOPHY

PL 100 Philosophy and the Human Condition: 3 Credits

An introduction to the study of philosophy through an examination of primary works in philosophy. The focus is on the historical development of major concepts (e.g., theories of human nature, freedom, war, etc.). Prerequisite: Placement into EN 101 Fundamentals of Composition I.


PL 100H Philosophy and the Human Condition (Honors): 3 Credits

This honors level course will be an in-depth introduction to the study of philosophy through an examination of primary works in philosophy. The focus is on the historical development of major concepts in philosophy (e.g., theories of human nature, freedom, justice, etc.) Prerequisite: Honors eligible on Placement test or Permission of Honors faculty


PL 101 Critical Thinking: 3 Credits

An introduction to the practice of critical thinking. Topics include the importance of critical thinking, the structure of arguments, analyzing and criticizing arguments, constructing arguments, the non-rational elements of decision making, and common fallacies.


PL 202 Philosophy of the Ancient World: 3 Credits 

A study of the development of ancient Greek and Roman philosophy from the Pre-Socratics through Plotinus, with an emphasis on the critical analysis of primary readings. Prerequisite: PL 100 or Permission from the Instructor.


PL 211 Philosophy in Film: 3 Credits

An introduction to the study of philosophical themes in film. The course is organized around a unifying theme presented in film and that theme is analyzed through the use of philosophical essays and contemporary literature. Topics include: the individual, authority and rebellion, theories of human nature, freedom, work, etc. Students will read original writings from major philosophers and contemporary literature, and watch contemporary films that deal with philosophical themes. Prerequisite: PL 100 or Permission from the Instructor.


PL 213 Contemporary Moral Issues: 3 Credits 

A brief introduction of ethical theory followed by an examination of contemporary moral problems such as abortion, euthanasia, suicide, capital punishment, civil disobedience, violence and war, responsibility to the environment, and animal rights. Prerequisite: PL 100 or Permission from the Instructor.


PL 216 Ethical Issues in Health Care: 3 Credits 

A study of general ethical principles and their application to individual decision making in the health care field. Includes such topics as the rights and responsibilities of the patient and health care team, truth-telling, informed consent, allocation of scarce medical resources, genetic engineering, death and dying. Prerequisite: PL 100 or Permission from the Instructor.


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PHYSICS

PH 201 Physics I: 4 Credits

This course is an introduction to the principles of mechanics and heat. The course provides working knowledge of measurement, motion, Newton’s Laws, conservation of energy and momentum, rotational dynamics, properties of matter, and heat energy. (Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory). Prerequisite: Algebra II in high school.


PH 201H Physics I (Honors): 4 Credits

This honors level course covers the same topics as PH 201 but in more depth, and with more applications in specific disciplines. The course is an introduction to the principles of mechanics and heat. The course provides working knowledge of measurement, motion, Newton’s Laws, conservation of energy and momentum, rotational dynamics, properties of matter and heat energy. (Three hour lecture and two hour lab). Prerequisite: Algebra II in high school.


PH202 Physics II: 4 Credits

This course is a continuation of Physics I. It is an introduction to the principles of wave motion, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, and atomic physics. (Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory). Prerequisite: PH 201.


PH 202 Physics II  (Honors): 4 Credits   

This honors level course covers the same topics as PH 202 but in more depth and with more applications in specific disciplines. The course is a continuation of Physics I. It is an introduction to the principles of wave motion, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, and atomic physics. (Three hour lecture; two hour lab) Prerequisite: A “C” or better in PH 201 or PH 201H.


PH 206 Calculus-Based Physics I: 4 Credits  

This is the first course in the two semester sequence of introductory calculus-based physics with laboratory. Topics include measurements, vector algebra, one and two dimensional motion, Newton’s laws of motion, work and energy, momentum and collisions, rotational motion, rotational dynamics, and solids and fluids. It is recommended for students who would prefer a stronger physics background than is provided by the algebra based introductory physics courses (PH 201-202). (3 lecture hours and 2 laboratory hours) Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in high school level calculus or concurrent enrollment in MH 201 or MH 201H.


PH 207 Calculus-Based Physics II: 4 Credits  

This is the second course in the two semester sequence of introductory calculus-based physics with laboratory. It is designed to meet the needs of students who would prefer a stronger physics background than is provided by the corresponding algebra based introductory physics course (PH202). Topics include principles of wave motion, sound, light, electricity & magnetism, and atomic physics. (3 lecture hours and 2 laboratory hours).  Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in high school level calculus or completion of MH 201 or MH 201H with a grade of “C” or better and a grade of “C” or better in PH 206.


PH 210 Independent Study in Physics: 1 Credit 

This course is designed to give the student greater depth of knowledge in a particular topic of interest in physics that may be useful in their area of concentration. For example, Allied Health Transfer-Pre Science majors might explore additional laboratory topics in physics. The student would complete a minimum of 30 hours of work. Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Director.


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POLITICAL SCIENCE

PLS 101 American National Government: 3 Credits

The student will examine the Constitution, Bill of Rights, the development of Congress, Presidency and the Judicial Branch. The course will also show the relationship that state and local governments have with the Federal Government.


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PSYCHOLOGY

PS 101 Introduction to Psychology: 3 Credits 

This course is an overview of the diverse field of psychology, and examines methods and concepts necessary for a basic understanding of human behavior and functioning. Topics include biology of behavior, perception, learning, memory, stress, personality psychological disorders, and social influence.


PS 101H Introduction to Psychology (Honors): 3 Credits

The honors course is designed for students who would like a more in-depth study of psychology. This is an intensive overview of the field of psychology. It examines methods and concepts necessary for a basic understanding of human behavior and functioning, and covers several diverse topics.

PS 102 Developmental Psychology: 3 Credits 

This course examines human development across the life span from conception to death. Emphasis is on physical, social, moral and cognitive development. Topics include theories of human development, nature vs. nurture issues, genetic influences, and psychosocial issues in childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Prerequisite: PS 101 Introduction to Psychology.

PS 105 Social Psychology: 3 Credits

In this course, the history and nature of social psychology, small group processes, attitudes and attitude change, conformity, cooperation, authority, research situations and applications are examined in depth. Prerequisite: PS 101 Introduction to Psychology.

PS 106 Stress and Health Psychology: 3 Credits 

This course examines the connection between the mind and the body with emphasis on how biological, psychological, and social factors interact to affect the susceptibility to illness. Topics include the nature and causes of stress, relationships between stress and disease, the impact of beliefs on perceptions of health and recovery, and stress management strategies. Students develop a personal plan for holistic health.


PS 107 Explorations in Personal Growth: 3 Credits

This course examines the importance of knowing ourselves as individuals and in social relationships and of being conscious of the way personality and behavior affects others.  Students are given the opportunity to develop self awareness and competence in dealing with others by understanding their own beliefs about people, society, and themselves.


PS 201 Abnormal Psychology: 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the study of maladaptive behavior and psychopathology. Emphasis is on the etiology, symptoms, and treatment of various psychological disorders in children, adolescents and adults. Biological, psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive and multicultural perspectives of abnormal behavior are examined. Prerequisite: PS 101 Introduction to Psychology.


PS 203 Drugs in American Society: 3 Credits 

This course explores drug and alcohol use, abuse and addiction in American society. Topics include historical perspectives, classifications of drugs and their effects, factors contributing to abuse and addiction, and prevention efforts. Intervention strategies, self -help support groups, and treatment options are also examined. Prerequisite: PS 101 Introduction to Psychology.


PS 204 Psychology of Aging: 3 Credits

This course is an overview of the aging process, with an emphasis on the later periods of life. Major theories of aging, stereotypes about aging and older adults, and changes in physical health, cognition, and social relationships are examined. There are opportunities for students to apply course material to everyday life in an effort to promote appreciation of the challenges and opportunities involved in the aging process. Prerequisite: PS 101 Introduction to Psychology


PS 290 Fundamentals of Interviewing and Counseling Practice: 3 Credits 

This course introduces students to the field of counseling with an emphasis on basic interviewing.  Students learn interviewing strategies, active listening, empathy, paraphrasing, and other fundamental skills through discussion and role play.   Major theories of counseling are examined and techniques associated with those approaches are demonstrated.

Open to Psychology majors only or with permission of program director.


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RELIGION

RS 102 Biblical Themes: 3 Credits

An introductory study of the major themes and books of the Jewish and Christian Scriptures, this course provides literary and historical background for reading Scripture. Contemporary significance of the Bible will also be considered.


RS 103 World Religions: 3 Credits

World Religions provides an introduction to the major living world religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese religious tradition, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. The course will compare and contrast key concepts found in the various religious traditions.


RS 104 Fundamentals of Catholic Theology: 3 Credits 

This course discusses traditional teachings and contemporary developments in key areas of Catholic theology: Scripture, God, Christ, sacraments, and morality. It examines both official teachings as well as significant political, social, and economic movements in the context of the 21st century.


RS 105 Eastern Christian Spirituality: 3 Credits

A study of the history, theology, spirituality, liturgy, and life of the Eastern Christian tradition. Particular emphasis will be placed on the teachings of Eastern Church Fathers.


RS 107 Religion and Human Experience: 3 Credits 

A study of the relation between religious thought and practice and the personal and social dimensions of human experience. The course will also elaborate on the content of religion especially in its role to communicate between immanence and transcendence. Issues include: the meaning and existence of God; faith and reason; the problem of evil and moral choice; the function of myth, symbol, and ritual.


RS 107H Religion and Human Experience (Honors): 3 Credits 

This honors level course is an in depth study of the relation between religious thought and practice and the personal and social dimensions of human experience.  This course will elaborate on the content of religion especially in its role to communicate between immanence and transcendence.  Topics include: the meaning and existence of God; faith and reason; the problem of evil and moral choice; the function of myth, symbol and ritual.  Prerequisite:  Honors eligible on the Placement test or permission of Honors faculty.

RS 108 Contemporary Religious Values: 3 Credits

An investigation of personal and societal values in light of current religious thought. Selective issues of morality, justice and peace, with an emphasis placed on discovering root causes of problems and ways of response will be examined.


RS 108H Contemporary Religious Values (Honors): 3 Credits 

This honors level course is an in-depth study into the personal and societal values in light of current religious thought. It is at the core an ethics/morality class. This course will offer an in depth look at ethical decision making and can serve as a “bridge” to the Bioethics course. Honors eligible on Placement test or Permission of Honors faculty.


RS 201 Thematic Topics in Religious Studies: 3 Credits 

This course offers an in-depth treatment of specific issues in religious studies. Topics will vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: Approval from the Chairperson of the Liberal Art Division.


RS 205 A Theology of the Encounter: The Life and Teachings of Jesus Christ: 3 Credits

The life, ministry and teachings of Jesus and the early Christian church are the focus of this course and provide the foundation in understanding our contemporary “culture of encounter,” that is, encountering the poor, the vulnerable, and the outcasts of the world. A theology of encounter stands in opposition to today’s throwaway culture that sees a human being as a means to an end.  Special attention is given to the content of the synoptic gospels as well as the social, political and religious conditions of the time. By means of lecture, class discussions and close readings of scripture, this course will also examine the prophetic, moral and ethical implications of Jesus’ message for today. Prerequisite: At Least One Three Credit Religion Course

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SOCIOLOGY

SO 101 Cultural Anthropology: 3 Credits 

An introductory cross-cultural study that examines human beings as creative animals who live their lives with a blend of meanings as they interact with their environment. An increasingly interdependent world is revealed as examples are presented from both contemporary societies and the primitive world.


SO 102 Introduction to Sociology: 3 Credits

An introduction to the basic concepts in the field of sociology. The course includes an analysis of the structure and function of social organization, culture, socialization, social groups, social stratification, social institutions, and collective behavior.


SO 103 Contemporary Social Issues: 3 Credits 

This course is designed to enable the student to consider different viewpoints on social issues and to encourage debate through proactive questions during each class session. Major contemporary social issues, all of which affect society at large, will be examined (i.e. aging, the homeless, domestic violence, child abuse, rape and substance abuse.) We will attempt to gain new insights and interpretations to help us better understand and evaluate society’s contemporary social issues.


SO 104 Introduction to Criminal Justice: 3 Credits 

This course will provide students with an introduction and overview of the United States criminal justice system. Study will include the differences between criminal, civil and social justice, what constitutes a crime, law enforcement, policing strategies, the judicial system, sentencing strategies and correctional practices.


SO 108 Medical Sociology: 3 Credits

This course will provide an overview of the relationship between social factors and health, the interaction between health practitioners and patients, and the ability of the patient to adapt to society’s changes within the health care delivery system.


SO 201 Thematic Topics: 3 Credits

A study of the culture, value system, social institutions and traditional artistic expressions of a selected group or several related groups inhabiting a particular geographical region. Prerequisite:   Approval from the Chairperson of the Liberal Arts Division.


SO 202 Practice and Theory in Child Welfare and Mental Health: 3 Credits 

A study of the child welfare system, the adult and juvenile mental health systems, and the relation- ship between lawyers and human services workers practicing in those fields. The course will survey the governing laws and regulations and analyze their history, purpose, and effectiveness.


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SPANISH

SP 101-102 Introduction to Spanish I and II: 3 Credits

These courses cover the basic grammar and vocabulary of Spanish, developing a student’s ability to use them for communicative purposes. In addition, they introduce the student to the Latino world, its peoples, and their cultures.


SP 201-202 Intermediate Spanish I and II: 3 Credits 

For students who wish to further develop their skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening in Spanish. Readings drawn from a wide variety of fiction and non-fiction works on topics of general interest. Study of Spanish culture is continued.  Prerequisite: SP 102 or placement into SP 201 or SP 202.


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UKRAINIAN

UK 101-102 Elementary Ukrainian I and II: 3 Credits 

Basic Ukrainian conversation courses designed to lay a firm foundation for subsequent Ukrainian courses. Emphasis will be placed on grammar, pronunciation, and conversation, with some reading and writing. Individual participation encouraged.


UK 201-202 Intermediate Ukrainian I and II: 3 Credits 

For students who wish to further develop their skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening to Ukrainian. Readings drawn from a wide variety of fiction and non-fiction works on topics of general interest. In addition, students are introduced to the Ukrainian world, its peoples, and their cultures. Prerequisite: UK 102 or placement into UK 201 or UK 202.


UK 203 Independent Study: 3 Credits

Offered to students who desire to pursue more intensive study of the Ukrainian language beyond the introductory levels, especially with the purpose of developing conversational and translation skills. Work will include readings from Ukrainian literature. Prerequisite: Approval from Chairperson of Liberal Arts Division.


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VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

VT 101 Veterinary Medical Terminology: 1 Credit

This elective online course introduces students to a broad range of veterinary medical terms. Topics include species-specific, anatomical and clinical vocabulary. Veterinary medical language is explored with a focus on understanding word components, Greek and Latin roots and correct usage in modern veterinary practice. (1 lecture hour) Prerequisite: Placement into college-level English.


VT 102 Laboratory Animal Management: 3 Credits

This course provides an introduction (ALAT level) to the care and use of laboratory animals in a research environment. Topics include animal welfare regulation, animal care and management, species and strain identification, nutrition, reproduction, gnotobiology, disease recognition and control, and euthanasia methods. A supplemental laboratory will cover the clinical management of rats, mice, and rabbits. In addition to lecture and laboratory, the course includes a field trip to a laboratory animal facility, and ward duty. Students should expect to spend time outside of class completing animal-care duties.(2 lecture hours, 1.5 laboratory hours) Prerequisite:Must have prior hands on experience in small animal clinical practice and green “Verification” form.



VT 103 Introduction to Veterinary Technology & Practice Management: 2 Credits 

This course includes an overview of the laws, ethics and rules of professional conduct that define the profession of veterinary technology. Areas of discussion include the role of the veterinary technician in veterinary medicine, research, regulatory agencies, industry and private practice. Topics in professional development include law, ethics, resume writing, professional conduct and grief management. An overview of office procedures and business practices relevant to private veterinary hospitals will also be covered. (2 hours) Prerequisites: Successful completion of required developmental courses based on the placement test or approved by the Program Director.


VT 104 Animal Parasitology: 2 Credits

A survey of clinically significant parasites of domestic animals. Parasites discussed include: fleas, ticks, mange mites, lice, roundworms, heartworms, hookworms, tapeworms, coccidia, and more. Information is provided on: host(s); life cycles; pathogenesis; means of diagnosis; prevention; and treatment. A supplementary laboratory will cover preparation of fecal samples and identification of the above-mentioned parasites. (1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours laboratory) Prerequisites: VT 110.


VT 105 Large Animal Clinical and Emergency Procedures: 3 Credits 

This course provides an introduction to the medical management of domestic farm animal species. Emphasis in the laboratory is placed on handling, restraint, and basic nursing skills, such as venipuncture, IV catheterization, and the administration of medication and fluid therapy. Routine and emergency clinical procedures are discussed. Laboratories are held at the Motherhouse Barn, Fox Chase Farm, and the New Bolton Center (University of Pennsylvania). (2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours) Prerequisites: Completion of the “Green Verification Form” proof of maintaining health insurance and immunization against rabies and tetanus. Students must provide their own transportation to the Fox Chase Farm. Successful completion of required developmental courses based on the placement test.


VT 110 Animal Anatomy and Physiology I: 4 Credits 

This course offers a comparative study of the anatomy and physiology of domestic animals. Cell biology, including a discussion of basic organic molecules, and cellular reproduction is covered in the early part of the course. Tissues, integument, skeletal and muscular systems are subsequently covered. Laboratories include microscopic examination of cells and tissues, gross examination of mammalian skeletons and dissection of preserved cats. Radiographs are employed to further illustrate anatomical parts. (3 hours lecture, 2.5 hours laboratory) Prerequisite: Successful completion of required developmental courses based on the placement test.

VT 111 Animal Anatomy and Physiology II: 4 Credits 

A continuation of Animal Anatomy and Physiology I. This course examines the remainder of the anatomical systems in the mammal and discusses comparative anatomical and physiological differences. Laboratory includes examination of gross tissues from various species including: cat, dog, sheep, pig, and ox. (3 hours lecture, 2.5 hours laboratory). Prerequisite: VT 110.


VT 112 Breeds and Behavior: 1 Credit

This course offers an introduction to common domestic animal breeds and their behavior. Identification of common breeds and species, recognition of normal versus abnormal animal behavior and prevention of behavior problems are emphasized. Animal learning theories and behavior modification techniques are also covered. An introduction to career options in animal behavior and professional behavior organizations and publications is also included. (1 lecture hour) Prerequisite: Successful completion of required developmental courses based on placement test or approval by Program Director.


VT 113 Animal Nutrition: 1 Credit

This course examines the fundamental constituents of food and how diet relates to the health status of domestic animals. Topics include: basic nutrients, critical analysis of pet foods, nutritional assessments and pet food recommendations. An introduction to prescription diets and nutritional support of debilitated and neonatal animals is also included.(2 seminar hours) Prerequisite: Successful completion of required developmental courses based on the placement test.


VT 204 Small Animal Dentistry: 1 Credit

This course offers students a hands-on laboratory in small animal dentistry. Oral examination, dental charting, dental radiography and prophylactic care will be addressed. Prerequisite: VT111.


VT 208 Hematology: 3 Credits

This course includes the study of the origin, development and characteristics of blood cells and provides an overview of hemostasis. Topics include normal and abnormal hematopoiesis, anemias, leukemias, normal and abnormal platelet function, principles of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Emphasis is placed on manual skill development, attention to basic laboratory techniques and applications to veterinary medicine. An introduction to veterinary cytology and immunology is also included. (2 lecture hours, 2 hours of lab). Prerequisite: VT110, VT111, and CH 101.


VT 212 Animal Radiology: 2 Credits

This course provides an overview of the basic principles of radiology. Topics include: theory of x-ray production; parts and use of radiographic equipment; radiation control and safety; restraint and positioning of animals; radiographic quality; film development. (1 lecture hour, 2 laboratory hours) Prerequisites: VT111 and Completed Green Verification Form.


VT 217 Small Animal Clinical and Emergency Procedures: 4 Credits 

This course provides an introduction to the medical management of domestic small animal and exotic species. Emphasis in the laboratory is placed on handling, restraint, and basic nursing skills, such as venipuncture, IV catheterization, and the administration of medication and fluid therapy. Routine and emergency clinical procedures are also discussed. (2 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours) Prerequisites: CH101, VT103, VT105, VT111, VT112, VT113, and MH102 or MH103. Completion of the “Green Verification Form” as evidence that the student carries health insurance and is immunized against rabies and tetanus. Students should expect to spend time outside of class completing animal care duties. Must be taken concurrently with VT218


VT 218 Pharmacology and Anesthesiology: 3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to theory and application of pharmacology and anesthesiology. Topics include: drug administration, distribution, and excretion; drug classification, with specific information given to: pain management,, drug action, side effects, and dosing; parts, care and use of the anesthesia machine; pre-anesthetic patient assessment; patient monitoring. (3 lecture hours) Pre- requisites: Must be taken concurrently with VT217.


VT 224 Independent Study: Variable Credits

A student who wishes to increase his/her scope of experiences within a particular area may elect to receive credit for that work by requesting independent study. Areas for independent work could include, but are not limited to: additional clinical experience at any of the externship sites, laboratory animal medicine at research facilities, exotic or wildlife medicine, and emergency medicine. A student earns 1 credit for each 40 hours of clinical work or 1 credit per 1 hour of Lecture or 2 hours of Laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Director.


VT 225 Animal Medicine II: 4 Credits

This course is a continuation of VT227 Animal Medicine I with continued emphasis on the veterinary nursing process. Diseases affecting the hepatobiliary, gastrointestinal, urinary, reproductive and endocrine systems are covered, as well as introduction to oncology. Epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, clinical pathology (serology and urinalysis), nursing interventions, and client education topics will be addressed during discussion of each disease. A clinical pathology laboratory focuses on quality control and excellent laboratory techniques. Hands-on and interpretive skill when performing urinalyses and serum chemistry analysis is emphasized. (3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours) Prerequisites: VT208, VT 227


VT 226 Animal Surgery: 3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to surgical principles and procedures. Topics include: asepsis operating room protocol, instrumentation, sterile technique, suture materials, suturing techniques, wound management, surgical assistance, pre and postoperative care of animals and pain assessment and management. An accompanying laboratory will include hands-on practice of surgical and anesthesia-related skills. (2 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours) Prerequisites: VT217 and VT218, which must be taken concurrently. Evidence of health insurance and immunization against rabies and tetanus as per completed Green Verification Form. Students should expect to spend time outside of class completing animal care duties.


VT 227 Animal Medicine I: 2 Credits

This course offers an introduction to the principles of animal disease as it relates to the veterinary nurse. Students will be introduced to the cyclical nursing process including: patient assessment, development of nursing care plans (nursing interventions), re-evaluation of the patient and evaluation of treatment efficacy. Diseases affecting the integumentary, respiratory, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and neurologic systems will be covered. Additional topics relating to toxicology, geriatrics and pediatrics will also be addressed. Pedagogic organization of each disease process will include etiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, nursing considerations, and client education. Prerequisites: VT103, VT104, VT105, VT111, VT113, CH101, and EN102. VT217 should be taken prior to or concurrently with this course or with permission from the instructor.


VT 229 Sophomore Clinical Externship: 12 Credits

This one semester clinical experience provides the sophomore student with the opportunity to refine clinical skills in off-campus veterinary facilities. Students choose from a list of College- approved externship sites and are trained under the supervision of certified veterinary technicians or veterinarians. Approved sites include specialty, emergency and critical care animal hospitals, USDA registered research facilities, and veterinary practices that specialize in equine, feline and exotic animals. Excellent general small animal practices are also available. This course includes 12 weeks of full-time training and requires one semester of full-time tuition. Sites may not be easily accessible via public transportation and students will be expected to provide their own transportation to and from extern- ship locations. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all other degree requirements. Students may not be on academic probation and must have a GPA > 2.2 in all program, math and science courses. Completion of the green “Verification” form as evidence that the student carries health insurance and is immunized against rabies and tetanus.



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