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Excel 2010

Every month, we'll add a new tip to help
become an Excel expert - so keep checking back!

If you are changing from an older version of Excel to Excel 2007 or 2010, you'll want to check out Microsoft's interactive guides to the new interfaces. The fun pages show you the old interface. You perform a command sequence - and the screen magically changes to show you how to do the same thing in the new version. Try it!

If you are moving from Excel 2002.2003 to Excel 2007, go here.
If you are changing to Excel 2010, this is your guide.

Here's an easy-to read summary of changes between the major versions of Excel, highlighting the most annoying and difficult-to-find features of the new 2007/2010  ribbon interface.

Default Font

posted Apr 4, 2012, 1:16 PM by td.comm camias

By default, Microsoft Office Excel uses the Body Font font in font size 11 (which is displayed as the Calibri font in font size 11 when you type data in a worksheet, header or footer, or text box). However, you can change the default font and font size for all new workbooks that you create.

  1. Click the File tab.

 

  1. Under Excel, click Options.

  1. In the General category, under When creating new workbooks, do the following:
    • In the Use this font box, click the font that you want to use.
    • In the Font Size box, enter the font size that you want to use.
  2. Click any other tab to return to your file.

 Note   To begin using the new default font and font size, you must restart Excel. The new default font and font size are used only in new workbooks that you create after you restart Excel; existing workbooks are not affected.





Need More Help with MS Excel 2010?



Have a MS Excel 2010 Question? If you would like to to know who to do one specific task in MS Excel 2010, email us at td@ccsf.edu. We may pick your question to be the next Excel 2010 Tip of the Month! If you’d like more extensive help (like attending a workshop or reading a full-length manual), visit the TLC website.

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Quick and Dirty: Count, Sum, Average

posted Oct 13, 2011, 3:35 PM by Victor J. Fascio   [ updated Oct 13, 2011, 3:35 PM ]

No, this isn't about functions. This is a really quick way to get basic information about a group of cells. They don't even have to be to together; you just have to be able to highlight them at the same time. So you can click and drag, and then add (or subtract) cells using Ctrl-Click - Cmd on the Mac (hold down the Control/Cmd key and click to add an individual cell to your selected group)

With a buch of cells selected, look down at the lower right of your Excel window - beyond the spreadsheet itself, on the frame. You'll see at least a Count of the selected cells - the ones that are not blank:
Selected cell reading (text only - not numbers)
But it gets better. If you select cells that contain numbers, you also get the Sum and Average of those numbers:
Reading of a group of cells that contain numbers
The disadvantage is that these readings are not preserved in the sheet and are not printable. For that, you'll have to insert functions in spreadsheet cells:
  • Count() to give a reading of the number of non-blank cells
  • Sum() to add up the values in a range
  • Average() to find the average
This method just allows you quickly to eyeball values for a one-time check or to see if your data is reasonable.

Freeze Panes

posted Jun 20, 2011, 12:50 PM by td.comm camias   [ updated Jun 27, 2011, 4:21 PM ]

To keep an area of a worksheet visible while you scroll to another area of the worksheet, you can lock specific rows or columns in one area by freezing or splitting Excel’s pane of visible cells:

1. On the worksheet, do one of the following:
  • To lock rows, select the row below the row or rows that you want to keep visible when you scroll.
  • To lock columns, select the column to the right of the column or columns that you want to keep visible when you scroll.
  • To lock both rows and columns, click the cell below and to the right of the rows and columns that you want to keep visible when you scroll.
2.    On the View tab, in the Window group, click the arrow below Freeze Panes.

3.    Do one of the following:
  • To lock one row only, click Freeze Top Row.
  • To lock one column only, click Freeze First Column.
  • To lock more than one row or column, or to lock both rows and columns at the same time, click Freeze Panes.
Be aware that...
  • When you freeze the top row, first column, or panes, the Freeze Panes option changes to Unfreeze Panes so that you can unlock any frozen rows or columns.
  • You can freeze rows at the top and columns on the left side of the worksheet only. You cannot freeze rows and columns in the middle of the worksheet.


Need More Help with MS Excel 2007?


Have a MS Excel 2007 Question? If you would like to to know who to do one specific task in MS Excel 2007, email us at td@ccsf.edu. We may pick your question to be the next Excel 2007 Tip of the Month! If you’d like more extensive help (like attending a workshop or reading a full-length manual), visit the TLC website.

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Formatting Spreadsheets with “Format Painter”

posted Jun 20, 2011, 12:49 PM by td.comm camias   [ updated Jun 27, 2011, 4:19 PM ]

Adding formatting to your spreadsheet not only makes it more attractive and easier to read, but it can make it easier for users to find the information they are after. Format Painter is very useful when you are extending a spreadsheet to accommodate new data and need to format the new cells to match the original data area. To quickly copy formatting from one part of a sheet to another, or to another sheet in the same workbook, use the Format Painter.

To use Format Painter to copy formatting options to a second cell
   1. Add all the formatting options you want to use to the first cell.
   2. Click on that cell with the mouse pointer to make it the active cell.
   3. Click on the Home tab.
   4. Click on the Format Painter icon on the ribbon.
   5. Clicking on a second cell will copy the formats from the active cell to this second cell.


To use Format Painter to copy formatting options to adjacent cells
   1. Add all the formatting options you want to use to at least one cell.
   2. Click on that cell with the mouse pointer to make it the active cell.
   3. Click on the Home tab.
   4. Click on the Format Painter icon on the ribbon.
   5. Drag select to highlight the destination cells. Doing so will copy the formats from the active cell to the destination cells

 
To use Format Painter to copy formatting options to non-adjacent cells
   1. Add all the formatting options you want to use to at least one cell.
   2. Click on that cell with the mouse pointer to make it the active cell.
   3. Click on the Home tab.
   4. Double click on the Format Painter icon on the ribbon.
   5. Click on a second cell to copy the formats from the active cell to this second cell.
   6. Continue clicking on additional cells to copy the formatting to these cells as well.
   7. Click on the Format Painter icon on the ribbon once again to turn it off.


Need More Help with MS Excel 2007?


Have a MS Excel 2007 Question? If you would like to to know who to do one specific task in MS Excel 2007, email us at td@ccsf.edu. We may pick your question to be the next Excel 2007 Tip of the Month! If you’d like more extensive help (like attending a workshop or reading a full-length manual), visit the TLC website.

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Selecting a Range of Cells

posted Jun 20, 2011, 12:20 PM by td.comm camias   [ updated Jun 27, 2011, 4:20 PM ]

Selecting multiple cells at one time can save time on mass formatting. Follow the tips on this handout to easily select any range of cells in Excel you want.


Need More Help with MS Excel 2007?


Have a MS Excel 2007 Question? If you would like to to know who to do one specific task in MS Excel 2007, email us at td@ccsf.edu. We may pick your question to be the next Excel 2007 Tip of the Month! If you’d like more extensive help (like attending a workshop or reading a full-length manual), visit the TLC website.

Note: The IP address for all comment posters are automatically archived by the Google analytics gadget we employ to help us improve web efficiency. If you are concerned about your IP address being archived here, please do not post.


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