Intermediate Low 6 (ESLN 3600)

Original Outline

City College of San Francisco

Course Outline of Record

 

I.            GENERAL INFORMATION

A.            Date            September 2005

B.            Department            English as a Second Language

C.            Course Number            ESLN 3600

D.            Course Title            Intermediate Low 6

E.            Course Outline Preparer            ESL Non-Credit Curriculum Committee

F.            Department Chairperson            ___________________________________

G.            Dean            ___________________________________

 

II.            COURSE SPECIFICS

A.      Hours                        180 hours

B.      Units                        Noncredit

C.      Prerequisites                  None

      Corequisites                  None

      Advisory                        Completion of ESLN 3500 (Intermediate Low 5)

D.      Course Justification            This course complies with the California                                           Adult ESL Model Standards.           

E.      Field Trips                        No

F.      Method of Grading            No grade

G.      Course Repeatability            As needed

 

III.            CATALOG DESCRIPTION

Intermediate Low 6 language skills. Comprehend spoken and written English containing some unfamiliar words.  Participate in increasingly extended conversation on some unfamiliar topics beyond survival needs.  Understand short reading passages differentiating between fact and opinion with some accuracy.  Write a clearly organized paragraph with relevant ideas and clearly organized ideas.

 

IV.            MAJOR LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

A.    Comprehend spoken English containing some unfamiliar words in mostly familiar contexts.

B.    Demonstrate ability to participate in increasingly extended conversational exchanges about topics beyond survival needs.

C.    Use an increasing variety of word analysis skills to determine the meaning of new words.

D.   Differentiate fact from opinion in simplified reading material and some authentic material.

E.    Organize relevant ideas and appropriate details into one or more clearly organized short paragraphs.

F.    Use Intermediate Low Level 6 structures and forms.

 

 

 

 

 

V.            COURSE CONTENT

A.             Listening skills

1.     Following instructions for multiple-step procedures and directions in a variety of situations (e.g. specific destinations in face-to-face exchanges or by telephone)

2.     Identifying essential information from a listening passage when given a verbal prompt (e.g. short lecture on familiar topics)

a.     Comprehending general meaning without understanding every word

b.     Comprehending without reliance on translation

3.     Understanding of simple questions and answers, statements, and face-to-face conversations in standard dialects containing some unfamiliar vocabulary

4.     Understanding of non-face-to-face conversations on familiar material in familiar contexts (e.g. telephone, intercom, public announcements)

5.     Recognizing differences between formal and informal language including reduced speech in simple familiar expressions (e.g. How’s it going? versus  How are you?) when accompanied by visual context and cues

a.     Recognizing reduced forms (e.g. gonna)

6.     Understanding implicit information (e.g. place, time, relationship of speakers)

7.     Recognizing organizational cues used in speaking (e.g. first, next, then, later, finally)

a.     Predicting what might be said next in a specific listening situation

b.     Understanding in spite of interference

B.            Speaking skills

1.     Describing a sequence of events in the past on a topic related to their personal lives

2.     Asking for and giving clarification on the content of utterances

a.     Repeating and rephrasing questions

b.     Requests and statements to clarify or confirm

3.     Initiating and maintaining simple conversations using appropriate forms of address and register

a.     Giving unsolicited information or messages

b.     Adding information to keep conversation going

4.     Engaging in conversation on familiar topics and increasingly on unfamiliar topics

a.     Using common interruption words and turn-taking in conversation (e.g.  May I say something?)

b.     Using appropriate register (formal/informal) in conversation

c.     Using language to show courtesy (e.g. thanking and apologizing)

5.     Summarizing a brief listening passage on a familiar topic

6.     Participating in simple telephone conversations on familiar topics

a.     Asking and answering questions in simple present, past, and future tenses on familiar topics

b.     Using phrases and expressions that deal with telephone interference (e.g. I’ll call you back later from my office/home.)

7.     Giving and asking for directions and giving increasingly complex commands and warnings

8.     Preparing and delivering a short, simple oral presentation on a familiar topic

a.     Using projection, pitch, intonation, stress and elision (e.g.  I opened it. [I open dit.])

9.     Engaging in a brief, simple interview on familiar topics (e.g. discuss employment history)

 

 

 

C.  Word analysis and vocabulary development

1.     Applying knowledge of prefixes and suffixes to determine the meaning of common words in context

2.     Identifying common homonyms (e.g. to/two/too) and increasing vocabulary of synonyms and antonyms

3.     Predicting meanings of unfamiliar vocabulary in material rich in contextual clues

4.     Interpreting meaning of familiar words used in a new context

a.     Recognizing common transitional words

5.     Recognizing common idioms (e.g. Give me a break!) and phrasal verbs (e.g. get off, get out of, pick up)

6.     Finding specific information using an index or table of contents (e.g. of a book, telephone directory, job manual, computer application help feature)

 

D.            Reading skills

1.     Interpreting abbreviations for an increasing variety of words in context of specific topics (e.g. employment and housing)

2.     Skimming for general meaning in short passages or paragraphs

3.     Scanning for specific information in simple authentic materials (ads, schedules, dictionaries, Web pages) related to immediate needs

4.     Interpreting simplified short narrative and descriptive passages on familiar topics

a.     Recognizing graphic format of paragraphs and conversation

b.     Understanding implicit information (e.g. Text: I cooked dinner, washed the dishes and did the laundry after I got home.   Question:  How did this person feel?)

5.     Interpreting simple charts, graphs, tables, maps and multi-step diagrams

6.     Interpreting simple narrative and descriptive passages on unfamiliar topics of material

a.     Using visuals or other aids that orient students to the passages

b.     Predicting meanings of unfamiliar vocabulary in material rich in contextual clues

c.     Recognize major divisions and subdivisions of reading material

7.     Distinguishing between statements of fact and opinion

a.     Interpreting newspaper headlines on familiar topics

b.     Understanding main ideas from titles, subtitles, illustrations and captions

c.     Recognizing common transitional words

            

E.            Writing skills

1.     Writing a short note or message including supporting details (e.g. to a teacher or supervisor explaining an absence)

a.     Using the correct format for personal letters

b.     Using the correct format for simple business letters

2.     Filling out a paper or online form requiring detailed personal information on varied topics (e.g. medical job, banking forms)

3.     Writing a paragraph that includes a topic sentence, supporting detail and a conclusion (e.g. on a topic of personal interest, to request the return of a cleaning deposit from a landlord)

a.     Write under a time limit

4.     Editing writing for spelling, capitalization, sentence punctuation and basic grammatical form, with some degree of accuracy

a.     Revising the writing content

b.     Editing for style and meaning

c.     Proofreading for errors

5.     Writing down important details from face-to-face or recorded spoken messages (e.g. about a child’s field trip, a job interview)

6.     Taking notes on familiar material transmitted orally (e.g. a doctor’s directions for taking a medication, or a job supervisor’s instructions about a task)

 

F. Intermediate low 6 language structures and forms

1.     Sentence types

a.     Exclamatory sentences (e.g.  What a beautiful day!)

b.     Requests (e.g.  Would you mind + gerund,  Do you mind +gerund)

c.     Suggestions (e.g. why don't I/we/you + simple verb)

d.     Compound sentences with so

e.     Adverbial clauses of time (e.g. when, before, after)

f.      Adverbial clauses of reason (e.g. because, since)

g.     Adverbial clauses of result (e.g. so, therefore)

h.     Direct Speech (e.g. He said, “It's time to pay the rent. [reading and writing only])

2.     Verbs

a.     Simple Past

b.     Past Continuous (e.g. I was taking a shower when he called.)

c.     Present Perfect

d.     Present Perfect Continuous

e.     Future Conditional

f.      used to (e.g.  I used to live in Mexico.)

g.     Modals (e.g. might/must [deduction])

h.     Modals (e.g. must, have to [obligation])

i.      Modal combinations (e.g. had to, had better, ought to, would like to)

j.      Modal combinations (e.g.  have got to, would rather, would rather....than)

k.     2-word verbs - separable/inseparable

l.      Verbs followed by gerunds (e.g. She enjoys swimming.)

m.   Verbs followed by gerunds and/or infinitives (e.g. She decided to go to Hawaii.

      They like to go/going to movies.)

3.     Nouns

a.     Singular and plural nouns - Count /noncount

b.     Nouns that are always plural (e.g. groceries, glasses, pliers)

c.     Nouns that are always singular (e.g. news, politics , the United States)

d.     Gerunds as subjects and objects

4.     Pronouns

a.     Indefinite it as subject

b.     ones

5.     Adjectives

a.     other, another, the other, neither, either

b.     No article for generalization with plural count or noncount nouns

c.     a/an  with singular count nouns for generalization

d.     the  for specified nouns

e.     Comparative - full syntactic expansion with comparative (e.g.  Mary is taller than her sister (is))

f.      Superlative -  regular and common irregulars

 

 

6.     Adverbs and Adverbials           

a.     Chronological order (e.g.  afterwards, later, next, then, finally)

b.     Frequency (e.g.  rarely, recently, already, lately, yet, just, seldom, not ever, ever, hardly ever)

c.     too  and enough  with infinitives; contrast too  with  very  and  so

d.     Intensification of comparative adjectives with much

e.     Adverb phrases (e.g. since 10:00,  for two hours)

f.      Sequence of adverbs (e.g. I sometimes go downtown by bus in the morning)

7.     Prepositions

a.     Review and introduce as appropriate

 

VI.            INSTRUCTIONAL METHODOLOGY

A.            Assignments

1.     In-class pair and group work (e.g. proofread notes notifying someone of an absence, a thank you note)

2.     Role-playing activities (e.g. job interview, renter and landlord, repair work)

3.     Individual timed reading and writing assignments

4.     Pronunciation practices individually and in a group

5.     Dictations (e.g. teacher and peer dictations on learned material)

6.     Guided writing (e.g. models of personal and business letters are presented, then students create similar letters)

7.     Context-based vocabulary work (e.g. students predict new words from contextual clues)

B.            Evaluation

1.     Follow spoken multi-step directions to complete a task (e.g. use a photocopier, use a computer program)

2.     Restate information or complete a simple outline identifying the general meaning, supporting details and implicit information from an open-ended dialog or listening passage that contains some unfamiliar vocabulary and a familiar context

3.     Prepare and deliver a short oral presentation in which students summarize a brief listening passage, sequence three to four items of information and present information with some detail

4.     Read an informational text or short easy fiction passage and fill in a chart showing the sequence of events, identify major characters and summarize the general conflict or outcome presented in the passage

5.     Complete a writing portfolio showing evidence of brainstorming or note-taking; a first draft, self or peer editing and a final draft

6.     An ESL Noncredit Department exit test is given to ESLN 3600 level students.  It is coordinated by the Teachers’ Resource Center

 

C. Texts and Other Materials

    1. Richards, Jack C., Interchange 2, Cambridge University Press, New York, 2004
    2. Purpura, James E. and Diane Pinkley, On Target 1: Intermediate, Scott Foresman English, Addison Wesley Publishing Company, Illinois, 1997
    3. Teacher developed material

 

VII.            TITLE 5 CLASSIFICATION           

Non-credit [meets all standards of Title V, Section 55002 (c)]

Proposed Outline

City College of San Francisco

Course Outline of Record

 

I.            GENERAL INFORMATION

A.            Date            September 2005

B.            Department            English as a Second Language

C.            Course Number            ESLN 3600

D.            Course Title            Intermediate Low 6

E.            Course Outline Preparer            ESL Non-Credit Curriculum Committee

F.            Department Chairperson            ___________________________________

G.            Dean            ___________________________________

 

II.            COURSE SPECIFICS

A.      Hours                        180 hours

B.      Units                        Noncredit

C.      Prerequisites                  None

      Corequisites                  None

      Advisory                        Completion of ESLN 3500 (Intermediate Low 5)

D.      Course Justification            This course complies with the California                                           Adult ESL Model Standards.           

E.      Field Trips                        No

F.      Method of Grading            No grade

G.      Course Repeatability            As needed

 

III.            CATALOG DESCRIPTION

Intermediate Low 6 language skills. Comprehend spoken and written English containing some unfamiliar words.  Participate in increasingly extended conversation on some unfamiliar topics beyond survival needs.  Understand short reading passages differentiating between fact and opinion with some accuracy.  Write a clearly organized paragraph with relevant ideas and clearly organized ideas.

Students develop and expand their knowledge of Intermediate Low 6 language skills. Students participate in increasingly extended conversations on some unfamiliar topics beyond survival needs.  They comprehend spoken and written English containing some unfamiliar words.  They understand short reading passages differentiating between fact and opinion with some accuracy.  They write clearly organized paragraphs with relevant ideas and clearly organized ideas using Level 6 grammar structures and forms

 

IV.            MAJOR LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

A.    Demonstrate ability to participate in increasingly extended conversational exchanges about topics beyond survival needs.

B.    Comprehend spoken English containing some unfamiliar words in mostly familiar contexts.

 

C.    Use an increasing variety of word analysis skills to determine the meaning of new words in familiar authentic texts.

D.   Differentiate fact from opinion in simplified reading material and some authentic material.

E.    Organize relevant ideas and appropriate details into one or more clearly organized short paragraphs.

F.    Use Intermediate Low Level 6 structures and forms.

 

 

 

 

 

 

V.            COURSE CONTENT

A.             Listening skills

1.     Instructions for multiple-step procedures and directions in a variety of situations (e.g. specific destinations in face-to-face exchanges or by telephone)

2.     Essential information from a listening passage when given a verbal prompt (e.g. short lecture on familiar topics)

a.     General meaning without understanding every word

b.   
Less reliance on translation
a.     General meaning without understanding every word

b.    Recognition and understanding of key details (i.e. as answers to questions in the prompt)

 

3.     Simple questions and answers, statements, and face-to-face conversations in standard dialects containing some unfamiliar vocabulary

4.   Non-face-to-face conversations on familiar material in familiar contexts (e.g. telephone, intercom, public announcements)

5.     Differences between formal and informal language including reduced speech in simple familiar expressions (e.g. How’s it going? versus  How are you?) when accompanied by visual context and cues

a.     Reduced forms (e.g. gonna)
5.     Differences between formal and informal language including reduced forms (e.g. gonna) and reduced speech in simple familiar expressions (e.g. How’s it going? versus  How are you?) when accompanied by visual context and cues
 

6.     Implicit information (e.g. place, time, relationship of speakers)

7.     Organizational cues used in speaking (e.g. first, next, then, later, finally)

a.     Predicting what might be said next in a specific listening situation

b.     Understanding in spite of interference

B.            Speaking skills

1.     A sequence of events in the past on a topic related to their personal lives

2.     Questions of clarification on the content of utterances

a.     Repeating and rephrasing questions

b.     Requests and statements to clarify or confirm

3.     Initiation  and maintenance of simple conversations using appropriate forms of address and register

a.     Giving unsolicited information or messages

b.     Adding information to keep conversation going

4.     Conversations on familiar topics and increasingly on unfamiliar topics

a.     Using common interruption words and turn-taking in conversation (e.g.  May I say something?)

b.     Using appropriate register (formal/informal) in conversation

c.     Using language to show courtesy (e.g. thanking and apologizing)

5.     Summarization of  a brief listening passage on a familiar topic

6.     Participation in simple telephone conversations on familiar topics

a.     Asking and answering questions in simple present, past, and future tenses on familiar topics

b.     Using phrases and expressions that deal with telephone interference (e.g. I’ll call you back later from my office/home.)

7.     Questions and responses  for directions and giving increasingly complex commands and warnings

8.     Preparation and delivery of  a short, simple oral presentation on a familiar topic, using projection, pitch, intonation, stress and elision (e.g.  I opened it. [I open dit.])

9.      A brief, simple interview on familiar topics (e.g. discuss employment history)

 

 

 

C.  Word analysis and vocabulary development

1.     Applying knowledge of prefixes and suffixes to determine the meaning of common words in context

2.     Identifying common homonyms (e.g. to/two/too) and increasing vocabulary of synonyms and antonyms

3.     Predicting meanings of unfamiliar vocabulary in material rich in contextual clues

4.     Interpreting meaning of familiar words used in a new context

a.     Recognizing common transitional words
4a.     Interpreting meaning of familiar words used in a new context
4b.     Recognizing common transitional words

5.     Recognizing common idioms (e.g. Give me a break!) and phrasal verbs (e.g. get off, get out of, pick up)

6.     Finding specific information using an index or table of contents (e.g. of a book, telephone directory, job manual, computer application help feature)

 

D.            Reading skills

1.     Interpreting abbreviations for an increasing variety of words in context of specific topics (e.g. employment and housing)

2.     Skimming for general meaning in short passages or paragraphs

3.     Scanning for specific information in simple authentic materials (ads, schedules, dictionaries, Web pages) related to immediate needs

4.     Interpreting simplified short narrative and descriptive passages on familiar topics

a.     Recognizing graphic format of paragraphs and conversation

b.     Understanding implicit information (e.g. Text: I cooked dinner, washed the dishes and did the laundry after I got home.   Question:  How did this person feel?)

5.     Interpreting simple charts, graphs, tables, maps and multi-step diagrams

6.     Interpreting simple narrative and descriptive passages on unfamiliar topics of material

a.     Using visuals or other aids that orient students to the passages

b.     Predicting meanings of unfamiliar vocabulary in material rich in contextual clues

c.     Recognize major divisions and subdivisions of reading material

7.     Distinguishing between statements of fact and opinion

a.     Interpreting newspaper headlines on familiar topics

b.     Understanding main ideas from titles, subtitles, illustrations and captions

c.     Recognizing common transitional words

                         

E.            Writing skills

1.     Writing a short note or message including supporting details (e.g. to a teacher or supervisor explaining an absence)

a.     Using the correct format for personal letters

b.     Using the correct format for simple business letters

2.     Filling out a paper or online form requiring detailed personal information on varied topics (e.g. medical job, banking forms)

3.     Writing a paragraph that includes a topic sentence, supporting detail and a conclusion (e.g. on a topic of personal interest, to request the return of a cleaning deposit from a landlord)

a.     Write under a time limit

4.     Editing writing for spelling, capitalization, sentence punctuation and basic grammatical form, with some degree of accuracy

a.     Revising the writing content

b.     Editing for style and meaning

c.     Proofreading for errors

5.     Writing down important details from face-to-face or recorded spoken messages (e.g. about a child’s field trip, a job interview)

6.     Taking notes on familiar material transmitted orally (e.g. a doctor’s directions for taking a medication, or a job supervisor’s instructions about a task)

 

F. Intermediate low 6 language structures and forms

1.     Sentence types

a.     Exclamatory sentences (e.g.  What a beautiful day!)

b.     Requests (e.g.  Would you mind + gerund,  Do you mind +gerund)

c.     Suggestions (e.g. why don't I/we/you + simple verb)

d.     Compound sentences with so

e.     Adverbial clauses of time (e.g. when, before, after)

f.      Adverbial clauses of reason (e.g. because, since)

g.     Adverbial clauses of result (e.g. so, therefore)

h.     Direct Speech (e.g. He said, “It's time to pay the rent. [reading and writing only])

2.     Verbs

a.     Simple Past

b.     Past Continuous (e.g. I was taking a shower when he called.)

c.     Present Perfect

d.     Present Perfect Continuous

e.     Future Conditional

f.      used to (e.g.  I used to live in Mexico.)

g.     Modals (e.g. might/must [deduction])

h.     Modals (e.g. must, have to [obligation])

i.      Modal combinations (e.g. had to, had better, ought to, would like to)

j.      Modal combinations (e.g.  have got to, would rather, would rather....than)

k.     2-word verbs - separable/inseparable

l.      Verbs followed by gerunds (e.g. She enjoys swimming.)

m.   Verbs followed by gerunds and/or infinitives (e.g. She decided to go to Hawaii.

      They like to go/going to movies.)

3.     Nouns

a.     Singular and plural nouns - Count /noncount

b.     Nouns that are always plural (e.g. groceries, glasses, pliers)

c.     Nouns that are always singular (e.g. news, politics , the United States)

d.     Gerunds as subjects and objects

4.     Pronouns

a.     Indefinite it as subject

b.     ones

5.     Adjectives

a.     other, another, the other, neither, either

b.     No article for generalization with plural count or noncount nouns

c.     a/an  with singular count nouns for generalization

d.     the  for specified nouns

e.     Comparative - full syntactic expansion with comparative (e.g.  Mary is taller than her sister (is))

f.      Superlative -  regular and common irregulars

 

 

 

 

6.     Adverbs and Adverbials           

a.     Chronological order (e.g.  afterwards, later, next, then, finally)

b.     Frequency (e.g.  rarely, recently, already, lately, yet, just, seldom, not ever, ever, hardly ever)

c.     too  and enough  with infinitives; contrast too  with  very  and  so

d.     Intensification of comparative adjectives with much

e.     Adverb phrases (e.g. since 10:00,  for two hours)

f.      Sequence of adverbs (e.g. I sometimes go downtown by bus in the morning)

7.     Prepositions

a.     Review and introduce as appropriate

 

VI.            INSTRUCTIONAL METHODOLOGY

A.            Assignments

1.     In-class pair and group work (e.g. proofread notes notifying someone of an absence, a thank you note)

2.     Role-playing activities (e.g. job interview, renter and landlord, repair work)

3.     Individual timed reading and writing assignments

4.     Pronunciation practices individually and in a group

5.     Dictations (e.g. teacher and peer dictations on learned material)

6.     Guided writing (e.g. models of personal and business letters are presented, then students create similar letters)

7.     Context-based vocabulary work (e.g. students predict new words from contextual clues)

B.            Evaluation

1.     Listening/Speaking

a. Follow spoken multi-step directions to complete a task (e.g. use a photocopier, use a computer program)

b.     Restate information or complete a simple outline identifying the general meaning, supporting details and implicit information from an open-ended dialog or listening passage that contains some unfamiliar vocabulary and a familiar context

c.     Prepare and deliver a short oral presentation in which students summarize a brief listening passage, sequence three to four items of information and present information with some detail

2.     Reading

a. Comprehension of an informational text or short easy fiction passage and fill in a chart showing the sequence of events, identify major characters and summarize the general conflict or outcome presented in the passage

3.     Writing

a. Write a paragraph based on a short written prompt

b. Complete a writing portfolio showing evidence of brainstorming or note-taking; a first draft, self or peer editing and a final draft

4.     An ESL Noncredit Department exit test is given to ESLN 3600 level students.  It is coordinated by the Teachers’ Resource Center

 

C. Texts and Other Materials

    1. Richards, Jack C., Interchange 2, Cambridge University Press, New York, 2004
    2. Purpura, James E. and Diane Pinkley, On Target 1: Intermediate, Scott Foresman English, Addison Wesley Publishing Company, Illinois, 1997
    3. Teacher developed material

 

VII.            TITLE 5 CLASSIFICATION           

Non-credit [meets all standards of Title V, Section 55002 (c)]


 Notes

  Focus on content of the outline.  Formatting and punctuation are not our primary concern














































 III. Description changed to better match Level 5 catalog description. (DTH)
















IV. C. in familiar authentic texts added to better match level 5 outline.(DO)








  IV. A. and B. exchange places to match the order of the skills in the catalog description (DTH)














V.A.1-7 Gerunds deleted, emphasis on task. (DO)























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
V.A. 2a. & b. Don't we need to include something about identifying specific info needed to answer specific questions?  Should this be listed separately?
Also, Less reliance on translation is problematic:  less than what?  and how do we measure it?  (DTH)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
V.A. 5a:  Didn't we decide you can't have a. unless you also have b.?  So I put a. into the paragraph.  (DTH)












 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
V.B.3. misspelling of maintenance corrected (DTH)
































 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
V.B. 8a:  Didn't we decide you can't have a. unless you also have b.?  So I simply combined a. with the previous sentence. (DTH)
























V.C. 4:  the same comment re a. without b. So I rewrote it as 4a. and 4b.  But now there's no introductory sentence.  Does there have to be an introductory sentence for every point?  (DTH)


























VD4b.  Is the answer supposed to be:  tired, or pleased to have completed all the chores?   Could we make up a better example?  (DTH)






































  E2.  What is a medical job?  (DTH)





























































2g.  Modals for deduction (e.g.  might/may/must)

2h. Modals for obligation (e.g. must, have to)

F2h. Question. Just wondering if teaching "must" as an obligation is valid. Do we really use this. Or do we use it more for exaggeration, like, "You must go there!"
KC

F2k. Two-word verbs-seperable/inseperable (like in L5)
KC















F4b.  one, ones 
kc




































6c Should these be two categories?
KC










VI.A.1. I question whether it's useful to give specific examples of pair and group work, as these can be used to practice almost anything.  (DTH)
















VF3 Can we consolidate these nouns as I suggested in L5 to correspond to L4?
KC 3/6





VI.B.1-3 Evaluation format changed to better reflect the organization used in outlines 1-5. (DO)

V4a Really? Is this all we have under pronouns? Compare with 4 and 5. 




















VI.B.2.a Read changed to Comprehension of  (DO)







VI.B.3.a added to better fit the continuum from the level 5 outline. (DO)









F6C Too and enough only with infinititves? Says adverbs of degree in L5. KC 3/6


.

 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Vi.C.1 & 2. How about more recent texts?  (I've never taught Level 6, so sorry, so suggestions).  (DTH)
Comments