Intermediate Low 5 (ESLN 3500)

Original Outline

City College of San Francisco

Course Outline of Record

 

I.            GENERAL INFORMATION

A.            Date            March 2005

B.            Department            English as a Second Language

C.            Course Number            ESLN 3500

D.            Course Title            Intermediate Low 5

E.            Course Outline Preparer            ESL Non-Credit Curriculum Committee

F.            Department Chairperson            ___________________________________

G.            Dean            ___________________________________

 

II.            COURSE SPECIFICS

A.      Hours                        180 hours

B.            Units                                                Noncredit

C.            Prerequisites                                    None

            Corequisites                                    None

            Advisory                          Completion of ESLN 3400 (Beginning High 4)

D.      Course Justification            This course complies with the California Adult ESL Model Standards.           

E.      Field Trips                        No

F.      Method of Grading            No grade

G.      Course Repeatability            As Needed

 

III.            CATALOG DESCRIPTION

Intermediate low 5 English skills. Learners understand increasingly extended conversations on familiar topics. Readings include authentic or adapted narratives and descriptive passages. Level 5 grammar structures and forms are used to develop short clearly organized paragraphs and messages.

 

IV.            MAJOR LEARNING OUTCOMES

 

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

 

A.    Demonstrate understanding of spoken English in increasingly extended conversations.

B.    Engage in conversations in familiar and some unfamiliar contexts.

C.    Interpret a variety of words, phrases and simple directions in simple authentic materials.

D.   Interpret simple, short narratives and descriptive passages on familiar topics using contextual clues to differentiate between fact and opinion..

E.    Demonstrate ability to write an organized paragraph or message.

F.    Use the language structures and forms appropriate for Intermediate Low Level 5.

 

V.            COURSE CONTENT

A.            Listening skills

1.     Understanding general meaning and details of face-to-face exchanges and recorded discourse with some unfamiliar vocabulary (e.g. common social situations, telephone conversations)

a.     Making simple questions and answers (e.g. responses to requests for assistance or information)

b.     Making statements  (e.g. important facts, directions and appointments)                                                                                                       

2.     Getting main ideas and some supporting details in factual discourse related to everyday topics 

3.     Understanding implicit information in an observed conversation (e.g. place, time and relationship of speakers)

a.     Understanding basic constructions (e.g. subject-verb agreement: He work.” versus “He works.”)

b.     Recognizing common conversation settings (e.g. workplace, party)

c.     Recognizing time words and expressions in conversation

d.     Recognizing relationship of speakers (e.g. parent/child, boss/worker, teacher/student)

4.     Comprehending organizational clues and sequenced information in a narrative passage read aloud and repetition of the main actions in sequence (e.g. first, next, then, later, finally)

5.     Comprehending multiple-step directions and simple rules or regulations presented orally with support materials (e.g. specific destinations, procedures)

6.     Using learner strategies for understanding spoken English

a.     Recognizing reduced forms (e.g. gonna)

b.     Understanding meaning, as affected by sentence level, stress, and intonation

7.     Differentiating formal and informal language, including some high-frequency reduced speech in simple familiar expressions, when accompanied by some visual context and clues

a.     Listening in spite of interference (e.g. different accents, regional dialects)

b.     Repeating and slowing down

c.     Recognizing inaccurate information

8.     Detecting the mood of a message (e.g. speaker’s feelings, urgent messages)

 

B.            Speaking Skills

1.     Describing a sequence of events on a topic related to a personal experience

a.     Use of organizational words and phrases (e.g. When I was..., first, then)

2.     Asking for and giving clarification on content of utterances

a.     Repetition or rephrasing

b.     Identification of inaccurate information and corrections

3.     Using appropriate register (formal/informal) in conversation

a.     Projection, pitch, intonation, stress and elision (e.g. I open dit.)

b.     Appropriate forms of address (e.g. Mr., Ms., Reverend, Mayor)

4.     Engaging in simple face-to-face conversations beyond basic survival needs

a.     Using minimal courtesy requirements (e.g. thanking, meeting, apologizing)

b.     Giving appropriate responses to common questions

c.     Giving unsolicited information or messages

d.     Using common interruption words and turn-taking in conversation

       (e.g. May I say something?)

e.     Initiating, maintaining and completing conversations

5.     Summarizing brief listening passage on a familiar topic

6.     Engaging in simple telephone conversations

a.     Making questions and answers in simple present, past, and future tenses

7.     Asking for and giving directions and increasingly complex commands and warnings

8.     Preparing and delivering short, simple oral presentations on a familiar topic

9.     Giving a brief, simple interview on familiar topics (e.g. employment history)

a.     Responding appropriately to statements and questions

b.     Giving unsolicited information or messages

 

C.  Word analysis and vocabulary development

1.     Determining meaning from prefixes and suffixes in context

2.     Using common homonyms (e.g. to/two/too) and increasing vocabulary of synonyms and antonyms

3.     Predicting meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary in material rich in contextual clues

4.     Interpreting familiar words used in a new context

5.     Understanding common idioms (e.g. Give me a break!) and phrasal verbs

      (e.g. get off, get out of, pick up) in context

6.     Using an index or table of contents (e.g. of a book, telephone directory)

           

D.            Reading skills

1.     Interpreting abbreviations for words in previously learned contexts

      (e.g. employment and housing)

2.     Skimming for general meaning in short passages or paragraphs

a.     Graphic format of paragraphs and conversation

b.     Graphic format of personal letters

3.     Scanning for specific information in simple authentic materials (e.g. ads, schedules, dictionaries, standardized tests, Web pages) related to immediate needs

4.     Interpreting simplified short narrative and descriptive passages on familiar topics

a.     Using common transitional words

b.     Understanding general meaning of text without understanding every word

5.     Interpreting simple charts, graphs, tables, maps, and multi-step diagrams

6.     Getting the general meaning of simple narrative and descriptive passages on unfamiliar topics using visual, graphic and textual clues that orient students to the passages

a.     Newspaper headlines

b.     Picture captions

c.     Table of contents

d.     Major divisions and subdivisions of reading material

7.     Beginning to distinguish between statements of fact and opinion

8.     Understanding implicit information

 

E.            Writing skills

1.     Writing a short note or message including some supporting details (e.g. note to explain an absence from work or school)

a.     Short thank-you notes

b.     Short personal letters

2.     Completing simple forms (e.g. job application, medical history form)

3.     Writing related sentences to form paragraphs on a topic (e.g. relate problem with a bill, ask for information)

a.     Topic sentence

b.     Supporting details

c.     Conclusion

4.     Using structure and vocabulary taught at this level with proper spelling, punctuation and capitalization

a.     Writing under a time limit

b.     Revision of writing content

c.     Proofreading for errors

5.     Writing down important details from face-to-face or recorded spoken messages (e.g. information about a field trip, job interview notes)

a.     Telephone messages

b.      Informational telephone recordings

6.     Taking notes on familiar material transmitted orally (e.g. a doctor’s directions for taking medication, a job supervisor’s instructions about a task)

           

F.      Intermediate low 5 language structures and forms

            1.            Sentence Types

                  a.      Questions with  which, how, what kind of

                  b.      Questions with  will you, shall I/we, would you, could you

                  c.      Compound sentences with  and...too,  and...eithe, and  or

                  d.      Compound sentences with  so: It’s raining, so we are staying home.

                  e.      Adverbial clauses of time: when, before, after: I’ll call you when  he comes.

                  f.      Adverbial clauses of reason with  because: I was absent because my child was sick.

                  g.      Exclamatory sentences (e.g. What a beautiful day!)

                  2.      Verbs

                  a.      Future:  will

                  b.      Future conditional (e.g.  If I get a job, I’ll take night classes.)

                  c.      Going to  future with simple present for use in complex sentences

                        (e.g.  When I finish this course, I’m going to look for a job.)

                  d.      Present continuous as future with verbs of travel:  leave, sail, fly, depart, arrive, go, travel  (e.g. I’m flying to Hong Kong next week.)

                  e.      Simple Past

                  f.      Past Continuous

                  g.      Present Perfect (e.g.  I have lived in the U.S. for two years.)

                  h.      Present Perfect Continuous (e.g. I have been studying English since last year.)

                  i.      used to:  I used to live in Mexico

                  j.      Modals:  should, could, may, would, must (necessity)

                  k.      Modals:  might/must  (deduction):  It might rain. You must be tired.

                  l.      Modal combination:   have to

                  m.      Modal combinations:  had to, had better, ought to, would like to

                  n.      Phrasal verbs

                  o.      More phrasal verbs: separable/inseparable

                  p.      Verbs followed by infinitives

                  q.      Verbs followed by gerunds (e.g.  He enjoys dancing.  He likes swimming.)

                  r.      Linking verbs

                  3.      Nouns

                  a.      Singular and plural nouns:  Count/noncount

                  b.      Plural nouns:  groceries, glasses, pliers

                  c.      Singular nouns:  news, politics, the United States

                  d.      Nouns as adjectives

                  e.      Gerunds as subjects and objects (e.g. Swimming is good exercise.

                         He’s afraid of flying.)

                  4.      Pronouns

                  a.      Indefinite   it  as subject (e.g.  It is important to go.)

                  b.      one, ones (e.g.  Mary has three new books. John has three old ones.)

                  c.      Direct/indirect object word order

                  d.      Reflexive pronouns

                  e.      anyone, anybody, no one, nobody, nothing

                  5.      Adjectives

                  a.      other, another, the other, neither, either

                  b.      No article for generalization with plural count and noncount nouns

                        (e.g. Vegetables are healthy. Milk is good for you.)

                  c.      a/an  with singular count nouns for generalization (e.g.  A butterfly is an insect.)

                  d.      the  for specified nouns (e.g. The man in the corner is Mr. Smith.)

                  e.      Comparative:  regular and common irregular

                  f.      Multiple adjective word order

                  6.      Adverbs and Adverbials

                  a.      Negative frequency adverbs and word order, mid-sentence adverbs with  be and with other verbs

                  b.      not ever, ever, hardly ever

                  c.      too,  enough

                  d.      too  and  enough  with infinitives (e.g. That table is too heavy to lift.)

                  e.      Contrast  too   with  very  and  so  (e.g. John is too tired.  John is very tired.)

                  f.      Adverb phrases:  since 10:00,  for  two hours

                  g.      Chronological order:  afterwards, later, next, then, finally

                  7.      Prepositions

a.     Common prepositions

b.     Preposition expressions (e.g. be careful of, be good at)

                  8.      Conjunctions

                  a.      or   in compound sentences

                  b.      Correlative conjunctions  either...or,  both...and

                  c.      because

 

 

 

 

VI.            INSTRUCTIONAL METHODOLOGY

A.            Assignments

            1.            Role-playing

                        a.  Job application and interview process using wh-questions

                        b.  A housing issue that may include a renter and landlord situation in which

                             there’s a problem that involves a repair

            2.  Pair and group activities

                        a. Students work together to proofread messages that have been written

                             (e.g. notification of an absence, thank-you note, a note to ask for a favor)

                        b.  Discussion to determine the purpose, main ideas and details of a reading

                       passage

            3.  Dictation

                        a.  Teacher dictation (e.g. new synonyms and antonyms)

                  b.  Peer student dictation on classroom topics

            4.  Guided writing  (e.g. students use a model to write a short letter, fill out a sample

                  job application)

                       

B.            Evaluation

            1.  Restate the general meaning of a listening passage on a familiar topic

            2.   Engage in a short face-to-face conversation on a familiar topic

      3.   Show ability to follow multi-step directions in a familiar task

            4.   Recognize the purpose and main ideas of an informational or practical text

            5.   Write a note responding to a short written prompt

 

C.      Texts and Other Materials

1.     Huizenga, Jann and Jean Bernard-Johnston, Collaborations Intermediate 1, Heinle & Heinle, Boston, 1996

2.     Brown, H. Douglas, New Vistas 2, Pearson Education, New York, 1999

3.     Instructor developed material

 

 

VII.            TITLE 5 CLASSIFICATION

           

            Non-credit [meets all standards of Title V, Section 55002 (c)]

Proposed Outline

City College of San Francisco

Course Outline of Record

 

I.            GENERAL INFORMATION

A.            Date            March 2005

B.            Department            English as a Second Language

C.            Course Number            ESLN 3500

D.            Course Title            Intermediate Low 5

E.            Course Outline Preparer            ESL Non-Credit Curriculum Committee

F.            Department Chairperson            ___________________________________

G.            Dean            ___________________________________

 

II.            COURSE SPECIFICS

    A.  Hours                        180 hours

B. Units                           Noncredit

C. Prerequisites               None

    Corequisites                None

   Advisory                      Completion of ESLN 3400 (Beginning High 4)

D. Course Justification   This course complies with the California Adult ESL Model Standards.          

E.  Field Trips                No

F.   Method of Grading  No grade

G. Course Repeatability  As Needed

 

III.            CATALOG DESCRIPTION

Students develop and expand their knowledge of intermediate low language skills.  Students learn to comprehend increasingly extended conversations on familiar topics.  They read authentic or adapted narratives and descriptive passages, and learn to use Level 5 grammar structures and forms to develop short, clearly organized paragraphs and messages.

 

IV.          MAJOR LEARNING OUTCOMES

 

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

 

A.    Use spoken English in increasingly extended conversations.

B.    Engage in conversations in familiar and some unfamiliar contexts.

C.    Interpret a variety of words, phrases and simple directions in simple authentic materials.

D.   Interpret simple, short narratives and descriptive passages on familiar topics using contextual clues to differentiate between fact and opinion..

E.    Demonstrate ability to write an organized paragraph or message.

F.    Use the language structures and forms appropriate for Intermediate Low Level 5.


V.        COURSE CONTENT

A.           Listening skills

1.     General meaning and details of face-to-face exchanges and recorded discourse with some unfamiliar vocabulary (e.g. common social situations, telephone conversations)

a.     Simple questions and answers (e.g. responses to requests for assistance or information)

b.     Statements  (e.g. important facts, directions and appointments)                                                                                                       

2.    Main ideas and some supporting details in factual everyday discourse

3.     Implicit information in an observed conversation (e.g. place, time and relationship of speakers)

a.     Recognition of basic constructions (e.g. past tense He worked.” versus “He works.”)

b.     Common conversation settings (e.g. workplace, party)

c.   Time words and expressions in conversation

d.     Relationship of speakers (e.g. parent/child, boss/worker, teacher/student)

e. Mood and intonation (e.g. speaker’s feelings, urgent messages)


4.     Organizational clues and sequenced information in a narrative passage read aloud and repetition of the main actions in sequence (e.g. first, next, then, later, finally)

5.     Multiple-step directions and simple rules or regulations presented orally with support materials (e.g. specific destinations, procedures)

6.     Strategies for understanding spoken English

a.    Reduced forms (e.g. gonna)

b.     Meaning affected by emphasis and intonation (e.g. It's a dollar seventy-five, not a dollar.

  c. Comprehension in spite of interference (e.g. different accents, street noise)

d.     Check accuracy of comprehension (e.g. You mean turn left at the bridge?)

    

 

B.            Speaking skills

1.    Organizational words and phrases used to describe a sequence of events on a topic related to a personal experience  (e.g. When I was..., first, then)      

2.      Clarification 

a.     Repetition or rephrasing (e.g. Could you say that again, pleaseI said fifteen not fifty.)

b.     Identification of inaccurate information and corrections

3.     Use of appropriate register (formal/informal) in conversation

a.     Appropriate forms of address (e.g. Mr., Ms., Dr., Officer)

b. Appropriate vocabulary (e.g yes vs. yeah)

4.     Participation in simple face-to-face conversations beyond basic survival needs

a.     Basic courtesy language (e.g. thanking, meeting, apologizing)

b.     Appropriate responses to common questions

c.     Common interruption words and turn-taking in conversation

(e.g. May I say something?)

d.     Conversation management, including initiating, maintaining and completing conversations

5.     Summary of a brief listening passage on a familiar topic

6.     Simple telephone conversations with questions and answers in simple present, past, and future tenses

7.     Directions and increasingly complex commands and warnings

8.     Short, simple oral presentations on a familiar topic

a. Volume

b. Stress

c. elision (e.g. I open dit.)

9.     A brief, simple interview on familiar topics (e.g. employment history)

a.     Appropriate responses to statements and questions

b.     Additional relevant information

 

C.    Word analysis and vocabulary development

1.     Prefixes and suffixes

2.     Common homonyms (e.g. to/two/too) and increasing vocabulary of synonyms and antonyms

3.     Unfamiliar vocabulary in material rich in contextual clues

4.     Familiar words used in a new context

5.     Common idioms (e.g. Give me a break!) phrasal verbs (e.g. get off, get out of, pick up) and collocations (e.g. Take a break)


           

D.      Reading skills

1.   Abbreviations for words in previously learned contexts   (e.g. employment and housing)

2.     Skim short passages or paragraphs for general meaning
    a.     The paragraph as an organizational device.
    b.     Extraction of main ideas.
 
3.     Scanning for specific information in simple authentic materials (e.g. ads, schedules, dictionaries, Web pages) related to immediate needs
 
4.     Respond to simplified short narrative and descriptive passages on familiar topics:
 
5.    Comprehension of general meaning of text without comprehending every word

6.      Simple charts, graphs, tables, maps, and multi-step diagrams

7.     Recognition of the general meaning of simple narrative and descriptive passages on unfamiliar topics using visual, graphic and textual clues that orient students to the passages:

a.     Titles, headings and headlines
b.     Picture captions
c.     Table of contents
d.     Major divisions and subdivisions of reading material
e. Glossing of key vocabulary
 
       8.       Basic concepts of fact vs. opinion

9.      Implicit information (e.g. What's the relationship between person A and person B?)

  

E.            Writing skills

1.      A short note or message including some supporting details (e.g. note to explain an absence from work or school)

a.     Short thank-you notes
b.     Short personal letters

2.     Simple forms (e.g. job application, medical history form)

3.     Related sentences to form paragraphs on a topic (e.g. relate problem with a bill, ask for information)

a.     Topic sentence
b.     Supporting details
c.     Conclusion
d.     Revise writing content
e.     Proofread for errors

4.     Use structure and vocabulary taught at this level with proper spelling, punctuation and capitalization
 
5.     Strategies of writing under a time limit

6.     Write down important details from face-to-face or recorded spoken messages (e.g. information about a field trip, job interview notes)

a.     Telephone messages

b.      Informational telephone recordings

7.     Take notes on familiar material transmitted orally (e.g. a doctor’s directions for taking medication, a job supervisor’s instructions about a task)

           

F.       Language structures and forms

            1.            Sentence Types

                  a.      Questions with  which, how, what kind of
                  b.      Questions with  will you, shall I/we, would you, could you
                  c.      Compound sentences with  and...too,  and...either, and  or
                  d.      Compound sentences with  so: (e.g. It’s raining, so we are staying home.)
                  e.      Adverbial clauses of time: when, before, after (e.g. I’ll call you when  he comes.)
                  f.      Adverbial clauses of reason with  because (e.g. I was absent because my child was sick.)
                  g.      Exclamatory sentences (e.g. What a beautiful day!)
                 
              2.      Verbs

                  a.      Future:  will

                  b.      Future conditional (e.g.  If I get a job, I’ll take night classes.)

                  c.      Going to  future with simple present for use in complex sentences  (e.g.  When I finish this course, I’m going to look for a job.)

                  d.      Present continuous as future with verbs of travel:  leave, sail, fly, depart, arrive, go, travel  (e.g. I’m flying to Hong Kong next week.)

                  e.      Simple Past

                  f.      Past Continuous

                  g.      Present Perfect (e.g.  I have lived in the U.S. for two years.)

                  h.      Present Perfect Continuous (e.g. I have been studying English since last year.)

                  i.      used to (e.g  I used to live in Mexico)

                  j.      Modals:  should, could, may, would, might, must, necessity and deduction)  (e.g. It might rain. You must be tired.)

                  k.      Modal combination:   have to,  had to, had better, ought to, would like to

                  l.      Phrasal verbs, separable and inseparable

                  m.      Verbs followed by infinitives (e.g. she wants to speak English.)

                  p.      Verbs followed by gerunds (e.g.  He enjoys dancing.  He likes swimming.)

                  q.      Linking verbs (e.g. I am tired.  He seems friendly.)

                  3.      Nouns

                  a.      Singular and plural nouns:  Count/noncount

                  b.      Plural nouns:  groceries, glasses, pliers

                  c.      Singular nouns:  news, politics, the United States

                  d.      Nouns as adjectives

                  e.      Gerunds as subjects and objects (e.g. Swimming is good exercise.  He’s afraid of flying.)

                  4.      Pronouns

                  a.      Indefinite  it  as subject (e.g.  It is important to go.)

                  b.      one, ones (e.g.  Mary has three new books. John has three old ones.)

                  c.      Direct/indirect object word order

                  d.      Reflexive pronouns

                  e.      anyone, anybody, no one, nobody, nothing

                  5.      Adjectives

                  a.      other, another, the other, neither, either

                  b.      No article for generalization with plural count and noncount nouns.   (e.g. Vegetables are healthy. Milk is good for you.)

                  c.      a/an  with singular count nouns for generalization (e.g.  A butterfly is an insect.)

                  d.      the  for specified nouns (e.g. The man in the corner is Mr. Smith.)

                  e.      Comparatives and Superlatives:  regular and common irregular

                  f.      Multiple adjective word order

                  6.      Adverbs and Adverbials

                  a.      Frequency adverbs and word order, mid-sentence adverbs with  be and with other verbs. (e.g. not ever, ever, hardly ever

b. Adverbs of degree (e.g. too,  enough)

                  c. Adverbs of degree       with infinitives (e.g. That table is too heavy to lift.)

                  d.      Contrast  too   with  very  and  so  (e.g. John is too tired.  John is very tired.)

                  e.      Adverb phrases  (e.g. since 10:00,  for  two hours)

                  f.      Chronological order (e.g.  afterwards, later, next, then, finally)

                  7.      Prepositions

a.     Common prepositions

b.     Preposition expressions (e.g. be careful of, be good at)

                  8.      Conjunctions

                  a.      or  in compound sentences

                  b.      Correlative conjunctions  either...or,  both...and

                  c.      because

 

VI.      INSTRUCTIONAL METHODOLOGY

A.            Assignments

            1.            Role-playing

                        a.  Job application and interview process using wh-questions

                        b.  A housing issue that may include a renter and landlord situation in which there’s a problem that involves a repair.

            2.  Pair and group activities

                        a. Students work together to proofread written messages (e.g. notification of an absence, thank-you note, a note to ask for a favor)

                        b.  Discussion to determine the purpose, main ideas and details of a reading passage

            3.  Dictation

                        a.  Teacher dictation (e.g. new synonyms and antonyms)

                 b.  Peer student dictation on classroom topics

            4.  Guided writing  (e.g. students use a model to write a short letter, fill out a sample job application)

                       

B.            Evaluation

1.    Listening/Speaking

a.    Restate the general meaning of a listening passage on a familiar topic

b.     Engage in a short face-to-face conversation on a familiar topic

c. Demonstrate ability to request clarification.

            2. Reading

a.    Follow multi-step written directions in a familiar task. 

b.     Identify the purpose and main ideas of an informational or practical text

c.     Differentiate between fact and opinion in a short narrative or descriptive paragraph

            3.   Writing

a.    Write a note responding to a short written prompt

b.     Write an organized paragraph of 10 sentences or more, within a time limit, on a writing prompt.

 

C.      Texts and Other Materials

1.     Huizenga, Jann and Jean Bernard-Johnston, Collaborations Intermediate 1, Heinle & Heinle, Boston, 1996

2.     Brown, H. Douglas, New Vistas 2, Pearson Education, New York, 1999

3.     Instructor developed material

 

 

VII.            TITLE 5 CLASSIFICATION

           

            Non-credit [meets all standards of Title V, Section 55002 (c)]





Notes


 



















































III. Description changed to better match 4 catalog description.
IV. A. Demonstrate understanding of is too vague.


V. Content - No more verbs



 
V.A.2. everyday added to discourse to be more concise


V.A.3.a.Recognition of added. Example changed to verb tense.
a.    e.g. past tense “He worked.” versus “He works."

V.A.3. Moved from V.A.8, intonation added.


V.A.6. b. example added




V.A.6.c,d. moved from 7





7. deleted because it's not a clarification strategy


8. Moved to 3.e

 B.  Speaking Skills
1.    Changed to clarify and delete the a. since it has no b.

2.     Ask for and give clarification
a.     Repetition or rephrasing, examples added
b.     Identification of inaccurate information and corrections        DTH
3.     Use appropriate register (formal/informal) in conversation
a.     Projection, pitch, intonation, stress and elision (e.g. I open dit.) Moved to 8. a-c.
b.     Appropriate forms of address (e.g. Mr., Ms., Reverend, Mayor)            D
4.     Participate in simple face-to-face conversations beyond basic survival needs.
a.     Basic courtesy requirements (e.g. thanking, meeting, apologizing)
b.     Appropriate responses to common questions
c.     Unsolicited information or messages - deleted
d changed to c.     Common interruption words and turn-taking in conversation   (e.g. May I say something?)
e changed to e.     Initiate, maintain and complete conversations 

5.     Summarize a brief listening passage on a familiar topic        DTH

6.     Participate in simple telephone conversations with questions and answers in simple present, past, and future tenses   NOTE;  We can’t have a. without b., so I rewrote it.     
7.     Ask for and give directions and increasingly complex commands and warnings 
8.     Prepare and deliver a short, simple oral presentations on a familiar topic  
9.     Give  brief, simple interview on familiar topics (e.g. employment history)
a.     Respond appropriately to responses to statements and questions
b.     Give unsolicited information or messages 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

V.C. Vocabulary and Word Skills would match level 4, but Word Analysis and Vocabulary Development is used in level 6.

V.C.1. in context deleted
V.C.3-5 are almost identical to level 6.

V.C.5. collocations added see level 4

  I would say that "What's up?" is an idiom.  Collocations would be:  take a break, get/have a checkup. 

V.C.6  Moved to reading. V.D.9
This is the same in level 6.



V.D-E
Modified to remove gerunds, use Bloom’s taxonomy - Bloom's not necessary in content, topic titles are the preferred language.

 V.D.1  Interpret taken out to make it topical.


 V.D.2.a.b.   Graphic format deleted.  New version more articluate.
 
 V.D.3    Eliminate spaces between a.b.c.d. and e.  
d. standardized tests deleted. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
V D4. Interpret changed to respond a. deleted
V. D.5 added V.D.4.

V.D.6.  Interpret deleted

V.D.7  Begin to deleted. 
 
 
 
V.D.7.a.Titles and headings added.
V.D.7.e. Glossing of key vocabulary added
 
 
 
V.D.8. Changed to simplify
V.D.9 Example added










































 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
V.F. Do we need to repeat "Intermediate Low 5"?  Other outlines do not repeat.

V.F. 1 Make all examples start with e.g. inside of parenthesis instead of colons-->consistant with L6


V.F.1.c.  Eithe changed to either









 
 
 
 
 
V.F.2 Make all examples start with e.g. inside of parenthesis instead of colons-->consistant with L6






 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



V.F.2.j - m.  I agree with Kelli about omitting (necessity) at 2j, plus I would combine 1) j and k, and also 2) l and m.  We don't want to specify the function of a specific modal in the outline because some modals have multiple functions, e.g. could, may,) 
V.F.2.J & k, l &m  combined.

V.F.2.j Are these all modals of necessity. Get rid of necessity. (Kelli)






V.F.2.p. Example added

V.F.2.q. needs an example
How about:  I am tired.  He seems friendly.


V.F. 2 q An example would be nice.

VF3 Do we need all these singular/plural distinctions? Also, Level 4 doesn't mention singular plural.
  Again, I agree.  I wouldn't mention "normal" plurals, so omit 3b but keep 3c and rename it  Singular nouns with plural meanings

V.F.3 Make all examples start with e.g. inside of parenthesis instead of colons-->consistant with L6

V.F. 3 d An example would be nice.







VF4 All Level 4 looks more difficult than level 5. It is more comprehensive.

VF4 Why do we wait until level 6 for superlatives? Many 3,4,5 texts have the superlative. Should we make it officially L5 or is that just too much in the curriculum?  kc 3/6 
I think this is VF5e, not VF4.  I totally agree.  Students are de facto learning superlatives in L. 3 & 4 because it's in their textbooks.  I would include superlative here for that reason.  (DTH)

V.F.4 Make all examples start with e.g. inside of parenthesis instead of colons-->consistant with L6

V.F. 4 a This is not explicitly addressed. Do we need it here? 





V.F.5 Make all examples start with e.g. inside of parenthesis instead of colons-->consistant with L6
















V.F. 6 Make all examples start with e.g. inside of parenthesis instead of colons-->consistant with L6


V.F. 6 b and c combined?
Do you mean V.F.6 b and c. combined?  (DTH)















































VI.A.1.b:  have joined two parts of the same sentence that were widely separated.











 








































VI.B 
Format changed to match other revised course outlines.  Some material added, because original content was insufficient.

VI.B.1.c. Added to match content


VI.B.2.c. Reading (c added)
VI.B.3. Added (DO)


VI.B.4 and 5 Repetitive and deleted (DO)





































































































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