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Q. I work for a Lehigh affiliate and but I am also a part time graduate student.  Will I still be able to get the vaccine if my ID identifies me as a faculty or staff member? 
 
Q. I am scheduled to donate blood the day before the H1N1 vaccine is given out. Can I still get vaccinated?

Q. If I just got vaccinated for the seasonal flu, do I have to wait awhile before I get vaccinated for H1N1 swine flu?
 
A: No. The only exception to this rule is that the live (nasal mist) H1N1 vaccine can not be administered simultaneously with the live (nasal mist) seasonal flu vaccine. The Health Center has requested only the injectable vaccine, which is safe for everyone.
 

Q: Can I get the vaccine if I am sick?

 

A: The only contraindications to receiving the vaccine are:

  • allergies to the ingredients: eggs or other components of influenza vaccines, such as arginine, gelatin, gentamycin (antibiotic) neomycin (antibiotic) and polymyxin (antibiotic)
  •  a history of Guillain-Barre syndrome
  •  past serious reaction to a flu vaccine 

Q: I think I already had the swine flu. Do I need the vaccine?

A: If you did not have the very specific test known as the RT-PCR (this is the “state test” that the Health and Wellness Center sent out) you likely did have the H1N1 swine flu, but it is not certain. According to the CDC, it is  not harmful to receive the vaccine, even if you have already had the illness.

Q: I have asthma (or diabetes, or another condition that puts me at high risk for flu complications). I heard it can be dangerous for me to receive certain types of flu vaccines. What should I do?

 

A: The vaccine that will be available is the inactivated injectable form, and is safe for everyone.

 

Q: I may want to receive both the seasonal and the swine flu vaccines at the same time? Is that safe to do?

 

A: Yes, because both vaccines are being offered in the inactivated form, you can safely receive both at the same time, and you need not wait any length of time after receiving one to get the other.

 

Q: I am in two priority groups, as I am 20 years old and have asthma. Can I receive priority over those people my age who do not have a medical condition? 

 

A: While the Health Center would like to do this, all those through the age of 24 are considered priority for receiving the H1N1 swine flu vaccine. We hope to have enough doses to cover all those students who wish to be vaccinated.

 

Q: How do I get help and report to the health center if I think I have the flu?
 
A: Visit www.lehigh.edu/health and click the link on the front page to report a case and gain access to other campus services put in place for students with the flu.
 
Q: I went to the Health Center earlier this semester with flu like symptoms.  The medical staff did a state test for H1N1 on me and it was positive.  Do I still need to get the H1N1 Vaccine when it comes out later this fall?
 
A: According to the CDC, if you have had 2009 H1N1 flu, as confirmed by an RT-PCR (state) test, you can be considered to be immune and do not need to be vaccinated this year against H1N1 swine flu. You may still benefit from a seasonal flu vaccine.
 
Q: Can I get vaccinated for H1N1 on campus?  If so, how?
 
A: When the vaccine becomes available and we receive it, we will administer it to people at Lehigh according to CDC and state guidelines - offering it to priority groups first, as mandated.  Please visit www.lehigh.edu/health for the latest information regarding the vaccine. Click on "flu clinic information" on the right hand side of the home page. 
 
Q: I was diagnosed with Mononucleosis a couple of weeks ago. Can I get the H1N1 flu shot even though I have mono in my system? Thanks.  
A: Yes, you may still get the H1N1 flu shot. Mono is not a contraindication to receiving it.

 

Q: Can my spouse, who is not a Lehigh University student, get the H1N1 flu and seasonal flu shots?
 
A: For the November 10th and 11th clinics we are prioritizing students, without exception. If there is extra after the clinics, we will open up the opportunity to faculty and staff.  If we receive more doses beyond that, others in the campus community, including family members, will be eligible. It is likely though that there will be other local clinics where anyone can receive vaccine before that happens.
 
Q: I have a quick question: by students only, does that mean undergraduates only? I have asthma, 22 years old, and am a graduate student.
Thanks for clearing this up.
 
A: "Students" includes all students (UG and Grad) through the age of 24, plus older students who can verify a medical condition that puts them at risk of complications of the flu. This verification can be either a form from the Health Center (e-mail inluhc@lehigh.edu) or a note from a personal healthcare provider.
 
Q: Even though I am over 25 years old, I am asking if I could take the shot next week because my roommate is sick now and I worry if he is the case...

A: Only those students who are 25 and older with underlying medical conditions (diabetes, heart disease, lung disease, kidney disease, immune suppression) are eligible for the vaccine clinics next week.
The incubation period is usually about 3 or 4 days, and up to a week. For now, wash your hands frequently and stay out of the room as much as possible. Roommates and household contacts in families do not always get sick. Good luck!
 
Q: I am a student and I have a 3.5 year old who has severe asthma. Can my child receive the vaccine from Lehigh instead of me ? My pediatrician is out of the vaccine and they don't know when it will be available next.
 
A: For the November 10th and 11th clinics we are prioritizing students, without exception. If there is extra after the clinics, we will open up the opportunity to faculty and staff.  If we receive more doses beyond that, others in the campus community, including family members, will be eligible. It is likely though that there will be other local clinics where anyone can receive vaccine before that happens.

For students over the age of 24, if you do not have a medical condition that puts you at increased risk for complications from the flu, you will not be able to receive the H1N1 vaccine at the clinics next week, but we may have more doses available at a later time.
 
Q:  I am planning on getting the H1N1 vaccine and I have a preexisting medical condition. When I come to the vaccine clinic, do I need to bring any medical records that would indicate this? 
 
A:You will need a doctor's note if you are 25 years old or greater. If you are a patient of the Health and Wellness Center, we can provide the note. Please e-mail us at inluhc@lehigh.edu in order to request this service.We will notify you when your note is ready and can be picked up at our office in Johnson Hall. 
 
Q: I am a pregnant 27 year old graduate student. Do I need a note from a doctor to receive the vaccine on Nov. 10th or 11th?
 
A: Although we can often see when someone is pregnant, we are requesting that you bring a note from your doctor verifying this. If the Health Center staff is aware of your pregnancy, please e-mail us at inluhc@lehigh.edu and we will notify you when your note is ready and can be picked up at our office in Johnson Hall. 
 
Q: I am a graduate student and the father and a "caregiver" of a 2-month old baby. Can I and my wife receive the H1N1 vaccine on Nov. 10 and 11th?
 
A:Your wife may receive the vaccine only if she is also a student, as we will be checking and requiring Lehigh I.D.s at the clinic. Parents will need a note from the child's physician, verifying the age of the child, either on the doctor's letterhead stationery or a prescription blank.
 
Q: How "safe" is it to receive the seasonal flu shot as well as the H1N1 vaccination at the same time?
 
A: The Centers for Disease Control has stated that it is safe to receive both the H1N1 and seasonal flu vaccines at the same time.
 
Q: I am wondering if there are enough for all students underclass and graduate or is  it simply first come first serve. Are graduate students definitely allowed to get it.
 
A: Because we did not get as much vaccine as we'd requested, it will be first come first served. Graduate students aged 25 or older may receive it only if they have a note verifying a medical condition that puts them at increased risk, as only everyone up to the age of 24 is considered high priority by the CDC to receive this vaccine.

Q: I have gotten the regular flu shot and have had no negative reactions. Is this shot similar in that if I 've had no problems with the regular seasonal flu shot I will be safe for this one? 
 
A: This shot is similar to the seasonal flu shot. So far, there have been no unusual side effects.
 
Q: I am allergic to penicillin. Is it safe for me to get the vaccine?
 
A: Yes
 
Q: I am allergic to sulfa antibiotics. Is it safe for me to get vaccinated?
 
A: Yes
 
Q: I am a Lehigh graduate student, over the age of 24, with no medical condition that puts me at increased risk of influenza complications. Can I pay to get the H1N1 vaccine?
 
A: No, this is not an economic issue. We must current limit the group vaccinated to students in the priority groups, until the vaccine is available more widely. The H1N1 vaccine is free to all those eligible to receive it.
 
Q: I am a Lehigh graduate student. I am not in a high risk group but I live with my girlfriend and she is. May I be vaccinated to protect her?
 
A: We are sorry but we are only vaccinating Lehigh University students in priority groups at this time.
 
Q:  I have a little bit of a cold now, and do not feel well. But I do not have symptoms of H1N1, such as fever or shaking chills. I am wondering whether I can receive the H1N1 vaccine now.
 
A: It is safe to receive the vaccine if you are only mildly ill and do not have a fever.