Fifth Grade‎ > ‎

5.5 Living Systems, Life Processes and Living Systems

SOL # 5.5

 

Blueprint Categories

%

The student will investigate and understand that organisms are made of one or

more cells and have distinguishing characteristics that play a vital role in the

organism’s ability to survive and thrive in its environment. Key concepts

include

a)   basic cell structures and functions;

 

b)   classification of organisms using physical characteristics, body

  structures, and behavior of the organism; and

 

c)   traits of organisms that allow them to survive in their environment.

 

 

Scientific Investigation

 (includes 4.1 a-l)

 

25%

 

Force, Motion, Energy, and Matter

(4.2 a-d, 4.3 a-f)

 

25%

 

Life Processes and Living Systems

(4.4 a-d, 4.5 a-f, 4.9 b)

 

25%

 

Earth/Space Systems and Cycles

(4.6 a-c), 4.7 a-c, 4.8 a-e, 4.9 a, c-d)

 

25%

 

Prior Knowledge

Previous/Related SOL

Vocabulary

Words and Definitions

Assessment(s)

The list below shows what is expected of a student to know, however, review is necessary

 

Students should already know:

 

- the diversity of plants and animals, including humans, in an ecosystem and how they interact with one another and with nonliving components

 

 

 

1.   plant cells

2.   animal cells

3.   nucleus/nuclei

4.   cell wall

5.   cell membrane

6.   vacuole

7.   chloroplasts

8.   cytoplasm

9.   plants

10.animals

11.vascular

12.nonvascular

13.vertebrates

14.invertebrates

15.life processes

16.liverworts

17.hornworts

18.vertebrates

 

 

RESOURCES

Books

Technology

Lessons

Trade Books

Text Books

SMARTBoard &Video

Study Guides

VA DOE Resources

What is a Plant? by Bobbie Kalman

 

Animals without Backbones by Elaine Pascoe

Fungi by Elaine Pascoe

 

Tiny Life in Your Home by Lisa Trumbauer

 

Tiny Life in a Puddle by Bobbie Early

 

(McGraw-Hill)

A6 – A15

A94 – A99

 

Websites:

 Plant and Animal Cell Models


www.solpass.org (password required)


Brainpop:

Cells

Invertebrates

Protists

Six Kingdoms

Vertebrates

Mammals


Jeopardy

 

SMARTboard (See files below)

Cells Cells Everywhere

Cells and Microscope Matching

Plant and Animal Cell Parts



 

 


Building a Cell


 

 

 

Other Resources

Graphic Organizers


Frayer Model (Vocabulary)

 




Top of Form

Bottom of Form

Curriculum Framework 2010

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

(Teacher Notes)

ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND PROCESSES

· Living things are made of cells. Cells carry out all life processes. New cells come from existing cells. Cells are too small to be seen with the eye alone. By using a microscope, many parts of a cell can be seen.

· Though plant and animal cells are similar, they are also different in shape and in some of their parts. Plant cells tend to be rectangular, while animal cells tend to be spherical or at times irregular.

· Organisms that share similar characteristics can be organized into groups in order to help understand similarities and differences.

· Plants can be categorized as vascular (having special tissues to transport food and water — for example, trees and flowering plants) and nonvascular (not having tissues to transport food and water — for example, moss, liverworts, and hornworts). Most plants are vascular.

· Animals can be categorized as vertebrates (having backbones) or invertebrates (not having backbones).

In order to meet this standard, it is expected that students will

· draw, label, and describe the essential structures and functions of plant and animal cells. For plants, include the nucleus, cell wall, cell membrane, vacuole, chloroplasts, and cytoplasm. For animals, include the nucleus, cell membrane, vacuole, and cytoplasm.

· design an investigation to make observations of cells.

· compare and contrast plant and animal cells and identify their major parts and functions.

· group organisms into categories, using their characteristics: plants (vascular and nonvascular) and animals (vertebrates or invertebrates). Name and describe two common examples of each group.

· compare and contrast the distinguishing characteristics of groups of organisms.

· identify and explain traits of organisms that allow them to survive in their environment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ċ
Cells Cells Everywhere.notebook
(9413k)
Caryn Wagner,
Jun 12, 2014, 11:50 AM
ċ
Cells and Microscope Matching.notebook
(2883k)
Caryn Wagner,
Jun 12, 2014, 11:50 AM
ċ
Plant and Animal Cell Parts.notebook
(773k)
Caryn Wagner,
Jun 12, 2014, 11:50 AM
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