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The National Anthem, The National Song.




The National Anthem



जन-गण-मन


जन-गण-मन अधिनायक जय हे,
भारत भाग्य विधाता!
पंजाब-सिन्ध-गुजरात-मराठा,
द्रविड़-उत्कल-बङ्ग
विंध्य[i] हिमाचल यमुना गंगा, उच्छल जलधि तरंग
तब[j] शुभ नामे जागे,
तब[j] शुभ आशिष माँगे
गाहे तब[j] जय गाथा।
जन-गण-मंगलदायक जय हे,
भारत भाग्य विधाता!
जय हे! जय हे! जय हे!
जय जय जय जय हे![16]






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Jana Gana Mana is the national anthem of India. It was originally composed as Bharoto Bhagyo Bidhata in Bengali by poet Rabindranath Tagore.[6][7] Later, it was written in sadhu Bengali or tatsama Bengali which is heavily sanskiritised.[8] The first stanza of the song Bharoto Bhagyo Bidhata was adopted by the Constituent Assembly of India as the National Anthem on 24 January 1950.[9][10] A formal rendition of the national anthem takes approximately 52 seconds. A shortened version consisting of the first and last lines (and taking about 20 seconds to play) is also staged occasionally.[11] It was first publicly sung on 27 December 1911 at the Calcutta (now Kolkata) Session of the Indian National Congress.[12]





The National Song




वन्दे मातरम्


वन्दे मातरम्
सुजलां सुफलाम्
मलयजशीतलाम्
शस्यश्यामलाम्
मातरम्।

शुभ्रज्योत्स्नापुलकितयामिनीम्
फुल्लकुसुमितद्रुमदलशोभिनीम्
सुहासिनीं सुमधुर भाषिणीम्
सुखदां वरदां मातरम्।।

सप्त-कोटि-कण्ठ-कल-कल-निनाद-कराले
द्विसप्त-कोटि-भुजैर्धृत-खरकरवाले,
अबला केन मा एत बॅले
बहुबलधारिणीं
नमामि तारिणीं
रिपुदलवारिणीं
मातरम्।।

तुमि विद्या, तुमि धर्म
तुमि हृदि, तुमि मर्म
त्वम् हि प्राणा: शरीरे
बाहुते तुमि मा शक्ति,
हृदये तुमि मा भक्ति,
तोमारई प्रतिमा गडी मन्दिरे-मन्दिरे।।

त्वम् हि दुर्गा दशप्रहरणधारिणी
कमला कमलदलविहारिणी
वाणी विद्यादायिनी,
नमामि त्वाम्
नमामि कमलाम्
अमलां अतुलाम्
सुजलां सुफलाम्
मातरम्।।

वन्दे मातरम्
श्यामलाम् सरलाम्
सुस्मिताम् भूषिताम्
धरणीं भरणीं
मातरम्।।





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Vande Mataram (also pronounced Bande Mataram) (IAST: Vande Mātaram) (transl. Mother, I bow to thee) is a Bengali poem written by Bankim Chandra Chatterjee in 1870s, which he included in his 1882 novel Anandamath. The poem was first sung by Rabindranath Tagore in 1896.[1] The first two verses of the song were adopted as the National Song of India in October 1937 by the Congress Working Committee prior to the end of colonial rule in August 1947.[2][3][4]

An ode to the Motherland, it was written in Bengali script in the novel Anandmath.[5] The title 'Bande Mataram' means "I praise thee, Mother" or "I praise to thee, Mother".[1][6] The "mother goddess" in later verses of the song has been interpreted as the motherland of the people – Banga Mata (Mother Bengal) and Bharat Mata (Mother India),[7][8] though the text does not mention this explicitly.

It played a vital role in the Indian independence movement, first sung in a political context by Rabindranath Tagore at the 1896 session of the Indian National Congress.[9] It became a popular marching song for political activism and Indian freedom movement in 1905.[1] Spiritual Indian nationalist and philosopher Sri Aurobindo referred it as "National Anthem of Bengal".[10] The song and the novel containing it was banned by the British government, but workers and general public defied the ban, many went to colonial prisons repeatedly for singing it, and the ban was overturned by the Indians after they gained independence from the colonial rule.[11][12]

In 1950 (after India's independence), the first two verses of the song were declared the "national song" of the Republic of India, distinct from the national anthem of India, Jana Gana Mana. The first two verses of the song are an abstract reference to mother and motherland, they do not mention any Hindu deity by name, unlike later verses that do mention goddesses such as Durga.[13][14] There is no time limit or circumstantial specification for the rendition of this song [unlike the national anthem Jana Gana Mana that specifies 52 seconds].[15]





More Patriotic Songs






School Song


For the beauty of the School,

For the beauty that abounds

For the love which as always

Over and around us lies;

LPS to thee we raise

This our song of grateful praise.

Bind us with your special love

As we go forth out of School

Give us courage moral strength

To withstand the strife of life;

LPS to thee we raise

This our song of grateful praise.

For the joy of ear and eye

For the heart’s and mind’s delight;

For the mystic harmony

Linking sense to sound and sight;

LPS to thee we raise

This our song of grateful praise.

For the joy of human love

From our teachers and our friends

For our guidance and their help

Values taught and traditions held;

LPS to thee we raise

This our song of grateful praise.


Adapted from "For the Beauty of the Earth", a Christian hymn by Folliott S. Pierpoint (1835-1917).

Subpages (1): Patriotic songs
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