Word of the Week


Contemporaneous

posted Mar 7, 2015, 12:13 PM by P.J. Scanlon   [ updated Mar 9, 2015, 6:12 AM ]


Contemporaneous (con·tem·po·ra·ne·ous) adj.  Originating, existing, or happening during the same period of time: “The contemporaneous court cases for the two defendants.”

*source: http://www.wordthink.com/

FESTOON

posted Dec 30, 2014, 9:14 AM by P.J. Scanlon

Fes-stoon - verb, adorn with chains, garlands, or other decorations.

Sample sentence: The students festooned the auditorium with cheerful decorations for the holiday concert.

SCHMICK - looking for a new way to compliment someone?

posted Oct 23, 2014, 3:53 PM by P.J. Scanlon

Schmick - (ʃmɪk) - adjective, smart or stylish

Everyone said the Jennifer's new dress was very schmick.

Vulpine

posted Sep 22, 2014, 12:39 PM by P.J. Scanlon

vul-pine: adjective, relating to a fox or foxes; crafty; cunning.

Example: The villain's expression turned vulpine as he described his devious plan. 

Hugger-mugger

posted Sep 13, 2014, 11:37 AM by P.J. Scanlon

hugger-mugger - noun, disorder or confusion

Example: She decided to get out of the hugger-mugger of city life and take a vacation in the country. 

Pericope

posted Sep 3, 2014, 5:26 AM by P.J. Scanlon

pericope

  
 puh-RIK-uh-pee  , noun;  
 
1.
a selection or extract from a book.
2.
a portion of sacred writing read in a divine service; lesson; lection.

Quotes:
...a single verse (and, in some cases, even a pericope is too small a unit to split analytically intofragments.
-- Donald Harman Akenson, Surpassing Wonder: the Invention of the Bible and the Talmuds 1998
To say that you ‘hover … half-seas-over’ is to dismiss as drunkenness the vertigo and mystery andmetaphysical drama of deep space, the claims of which are nonetheless conceded in phrases such as‘glorious Gothic scenes’ and the telling juxtaposition in the same pericope  of ‘phantasies’ and ‘soul’.
-- Geoffrey Ward, Byron and the Limits of Fiction 1988, edited by Bernard Beatty and Vincent Newey
Origin:
Pericope  came to Enlgish in the mid-1600s, and is ultimately derived from the Greek perikopḗ  meaning "acutting."
Source: Dictionary.com

splenetic - sple/net/tic (adj.)

posted Oct 23, 2009, 12:21 AM by P.J. Scanlon   [ updated Aug 13, 2014, 9:01 AM ]

splenetic - sple/net/tic (adj.) 

1. bad temper; spiteful.

Example Sentence:

The children hated spending the summer with their splenetic aunt. 

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