Story Hour

Podcast
 
While I have loved storytelling for many years, and include a more personal page later in the site devoted to storytelling as a hobby, it is also an essential skill for librarians working with children.  I created a podcast of the story Falling for Rapunzel by Leah Wilcox as a project in my Services to School-Age Children class.
 
 
 
Puppetry
 
I was given several opportunities to present selected portions of storytime.  Monsters are always a big hit with the preschool and kindergarten crowd, and I created this puppet, "Mo," to perform Rebecca, Ed and Adrian Emberley's There Was an Old Monster. Mo's young audiences demanded an encore.
 
Mo was created from shag fleece, Poly-Fill, styrofoam, felt, cardboard, foam rubber, and hot glue, based on a YouTube video found here.
 
 
Mo's entourage of edibles were created predominantly from foam rubber, glitterized foam rubber and hot glue with Velcro hooks on the back to stick to the felt board.  They were modeled closely on Ed Emberley's artwork found in There Was an Old Monster.  The story was performed using Adrian Emberley's recording of the story.
 
Handouts 
Part of our work as librarians, particularly when working with very small children in the public arena, is to serve as a model and guide for parents learning how to help develop literacy skills in their children.  Plus, it's simply good advertising to make sure children leave the library with something that reminds them of their experience.  Storytime handouts are not difficult to make, and can help parents recall and repeat the skills and activities they see us use with their children.
 
Babies (0-12 months) 
Baby Bellies and Other Things
0 - 12 month Story Time
 
Welcome Song

Tune of "If You're Happy and You Know it"

 

Good morning and good morning,

how are you?

Good morning and good morning,

how are you?

How are you this special day?

I'm so glad you came to play,

So good morning and good morning, how are you?

 
Book

Whose Nose and Toes?  by John Butler

 

Rhyme Time

Touch/Tickle Rhyme: “Two Little

Eyes”

 

Two little eyes to look around.

(Point to baby's eyes)

Two little ears to hear each sound.

(Wiggle baby's ears)

One little nose  that smells what's sweet.

(Wiggle baby's nose)

One little mouth that likes to eat.

(Wiggle baby's mouth)

 

Touch/Tickle Rhyme: “Round and Round the Garden”

 

Round and round the garden

(draw a circle in baby's hand)

Like a teddy bear

One step, two step

(Walk fingers up baby's arm)

Hidden under there!

(Tickle baby's underarm)

 

 

Bounce/Lift Song: “What Shall We Do…?”

Tune of “What Shall We Do With a Drunken Sailor?

 

What shall we do with a tiny baby?            (sway baby back and forth)

What shall we do with a tiny baby?

What shall we do with a tiny baby?

Early in the morning

 

Hug and squeeze and kiss the baby.          (Follow song directions)

Hug and squeeze and kiss the baby.

Hug and squeeze and kiss the baby.

Early in the morning

 

Way-hey, up goes baby!

(Lift baby in the air)

Way-hey, up goes baby!

Way-hey, up goes baby!

Early in the morning

 

Hop, hop, bounce along baby.        (Bounce baby on knee)

Hop, hop, bounce along baby.

Hop, hop, bounce along baby.

Early in the morning

 

Way-hey, up goes baby                   (Lift baby in the air)

Way-hey, up goes baby!

Way-hey, up goes baby!

Early in the morning

 

Toe/Foot Rhyme: “This Little Piggy”

 

This little piggy went to market.      (Wiggle largest toe)

This little piggy stayed home.          (Continue wiggling toes)

This little piggy had roast beef.

This little piggy had none.

And this little piggy cried,

"Wee! Wee! Wee!"                            (Wiggle little toe)

All the way home.                             (Tickle baby up to chin)

 

Finger/Hand Rhyme: “Five Fat Peas”

 

Five fat peas, in a pea pod pressed.

(hold baby's hands in fists)

One grew, two grew. So did all the rest.

(open fists slowly)

They grew and grew and did not stop.

(raise arms in the air slowly)

Until one day the pod went POP!

(clap hands together)

 

Book 

Where is Baby’s Belly Button?  by Karen Katz

 

Rhyme Time 

Touch/Tickle: “These are Baby’s Fingers”

 

These are baby's fingers.

(Touch fingers)

These are baby's toes.

(Touch toes)

This is baby's belly button.

(Point to bellybutton)

Round and round it goes.

(Draw circles around bellybutton)

 

Bounce/Lift Rhyme: “Busy, Busy Lizzie”

 

Busy, busy Lizzie

(Bounce baby on one knee)

All in a tizzy

Drank some soda POP!

(Lift baby into air)

And got all dizzy!

(Bounce child on other knee)

 

Finger/Hand Song: “Eensy Weensy Spider”

 

The eensy, weensy spider

(Crawl fingers up)

Went up the water spout

Down came the rain and     (Wiggle fingers down)

Washed the spider out

(Brush hands down and out)

Out came the sun and

(Arms circle over head)

Dried up all the rain

So the eensy weensy spider

(Crawl fingers up)

Went up the spout again.

 

Toe/Foot Rhyme: “Wiggle Your Toes”

Tune: "Row, Row, Row Your Boat"

 

Wiggle, wiggle, wiggle your toes.  (Wiggle baby's toes or feet)

Wiggle them up and down.            (Follow song directions)

Wiggle them fast, wiggle them slow.

Wiggle them all around.

 

Closing Song

(to the tune of "If You're Happy and You Know it")

 

Oh, it's time to say goodbye to all our friends,

For our story time is coming to an end.

We're so sad to watch you go,

But we'll see you soon, we know.

And it's time to say goodbye to all our friends.

 

References
The Children’s Department of Perry Public Library. 2006.  Babytime: Games, Rhymes, Songs, and Lullabies for Babies. http://www.scribd.com/doc/27362530/Games-Rhymes-Songs-And-Lullabies-for-Babies
Fun Baby Games Online. “Counting Fingerplays for Child Play.” http://www.fun-baby-games-online.com/baby-activities.html
Hennepin County Library. 2010. “Booklists: Favorites for Babies.” Hennepin County Library. http://www.hclib.org/BirthTo6/booklistaction.cfm?list_num=224 
Jones. 2010. “Hello and Goodbye Songs.” Mrs. Jones’ Room. http://www.mrsjonesroom.com/songs/helloandgoodbye.html 
Mission Bay Library.  “Children’s Songs & Rhymes.” Mission Bay Library/San Francisco Public Library. Blog post. http://missionbaylibrary.blogspot.com/2009/07/songs-rhymes-here-are-lyrics-to-songs.html 
Nespeca, Sue M. 2010. Developmental Characteristics, Materials, Rhymes, Songs, and Programs for Babies and Their Caregivers. Class handout.
Preschool Education. 2011. “Music & Songs: Circle Time > Hello.” Preschool Education: Discover the Fun in Learning. http://www.preschooleducation.com/shello.shtml
Toddlers (12-24 months)
 

Creepy, Crawly Things

Toddler Storytime

 

Welcome

 

Use a bell or chime to signal; have the children march into the space and follow the directions.  This is a “rounding them up” activity.

Tune: “Here we go ‘round the mulberry bush

 

Here we come to storytime,

To storytime, to storytime.

Here we come to storytime.

We’re at our storytime.

 

This is the way we sit on our rugs,

Sit on our rugs, sit on our rugs.

This is the way we sit on our rugs

Here at our storytime.

 

This is the way we fold our hands

Fold our hands, fold our hands.

This is the way we fold our hands

Here at our storytime.

 

Where are we going at storytime,

At storytime, at storytime?

Where are we going at storytime,

Going at storytime?

 

(Spoken: “We are going to see lots of BUGS today!”)

 

And now it’s time to have some fun

Have some fun, have some fun.

And now it’s time to have some fun

Here at our storytime.

 

Look at Me

Tell the children it is time to get their “Listening Dust.”  Use a long feather duster, call each child by name and have them open their hands to get the listening dust you shake or brush into their hands.  For shy or reluctant children, wave the feather duster close enough to puff a little air in their direction instead.

 

Opening song/fingerplay: It’s Storytime!

Clap, clap, clap your hands,

(Follow motions as described in song)

Slap, slap, slap your knees,

Hold, hold, hold your hands,

Time for storytime – Please!

(Hold out clasped hands as if begging)

 

Book

 

The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle

 

Rhyme Time

 

Fingerplay: Baby Bumblebee (can be sung or chanted)

I’m bringing home a baby bumblebee.    (Cup hands together)

Won’t my mommy be so proud of me?

I’m bringing home a baby bumblebee.

Ouch!  It stung me!  (move hands as if stung)

 

I’m letting go of baby bumblebee.             (open hands)

Won’t my mommy be so proud of me?

I’m letting go of baby bumblebee.

Bye!       (wave goodbye)

 

Active Song: Shake My Sillies Out (song by Raffi, available on the Singable Songs Collection CD collection or on More Singable Songs for the Very Young.)

 

I gotta shake, shake, shake my sillies out.

Shake, shake, shake my sillies out.

Shake, shake, shake my sillies out

And wiggle my waggles away.

 

I gotta clap, clap, clap my crazies out…

 

I gotta jump, jump, jump my jiggles out…

 

I gotta yawn, yawn, yawn my sleepies out…

 

I gotta shake, shake, shake my sillies out…

 

Book

 

There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly by Simms Taback

(Any version will do; this is a Caldecott Honor book.  Story can be read or sung.)

 

Rhyme Time

 

Whole-body rhyme: Up, Out, Front (2-3x)

(Do while seated on the floor)

 

Put your hands way up

Put your feet way up

Put your hands way out

Put your feet way out

Put your hands in front

Put your feet in front

And clap, clap clap

And stomp, stomp, stomp!

 

Book

 

Spider on the Floor by Raffi.

(Song accompaniment available on the Singable Songs Collection CD collection or on Singable Songs for the Very Young.  Story can be sung or read.)

 

Rhyme Time

 

Song/Fingerplay: Eensy, Weensy Spider

The eensy, weensy spider                (Crawl fingers up)

Went up the water spout

Down came the rain and     (Wiggle fingers down)

Washed the spider out                     (Brush hands down and out)

Out came the sun and                      (Arms circle over head)

Dried up all the rain

So the eensy weensy spider            (Crawl fingers up)

Went up the spout again.

 

Quiet Time

 

(Can be done after closing based on librarian preference or time allowance)

Have toddlers select a book from the age-appropriate displayss and share with parent or caregiver.

 

Wrap-Up

 

Tell children it is time to return their listening dust.  Children brush all listening dust off their clothes and hair and pour it into your hands.  You pour it into a pocket, onto the feather duster, or in a special place such as a box reserved for it.

 

Closing Song

 

Tune: “Mulberry Bush”  Sing twice, slower than opening.)

 

Now this is the end of storytime

Of storytime, of storytime.

This is the end of storytime.

Come and visit again!

 
References
Cavoukian, Raffi. 2011. ”Lyrics & Arrangements.” Raffinews. http://www.raffinews.com/educators/music.
Nespeca, Sue McCleaf. 2010. Materials, Rhymes, Songs and Programs for Toddlers and their Caregivers and for Mixed-Age Programs O-3. Class handout.

Nichols, Judy.  1988. Storytimes for Two-Year-Olds.. 2nd ed. Chicago: American Library Association.

Patricia. “Rhymes and Fingerplays.” The Chalkboard.  http://www.kidschalkboard.com/learning.html.
 
 Preschool (3 - 4 years)  

Preschool Storytime: Monster Madness!

Welcome!

 

Opening Rap/Song

Spoken to call children to storytime:

 

Hi! Hi! Hi!  Hello! Hello!

What a great day for storytime, you know!

 

Hi! Hi! Hi! Hello! Hello!

Time to get started. Let’s go, go, go!

 

Sung as they gather in the circle:

Let’s come and be together, together, together.

Let’s come and be together at our storytime.

With Jason and Lisa and Amy and Andrew

Let’s come and be together for our storytime.

 

Now here we are together, together, together

Now here we are together at our storytime.

With Lila and Calvin and Kelly and Joey

We all are here together for our storytime.

*Use children’s names, repeat for all children

 

Question: Have you ever been scared of a monster?

 

Book

 

I Need My Monster by Amanda Noll

 

Rhyme Time

 

Song: “We’re Going on a Monster Hunt”

Tune: We’re Going on a Bear Hunt

 

We’re going on a monster hunt.

We’re going to find a big one!

We’re not scared, but…

What if he’s under the bed?  Better go OVER it.

Squoosh, squoosh, squoosh.

What if he’s in the closet?  Better CLOSE it.

Slam, slam, slam.

What if he is behind the curtains?  Better OPEN them.

Swish, swish, swish.

What if he’s in the hallway?  Better TIPTOE down it.

Tiptoe, tiptoe, tiptoe.

What if he’s in the garage?  Better STOMP through it.

Stomp, stomp, stomp.

AAAHH!!  IT’S THE MONSTER!

What’s that you say? 

You’re big, but you’re friendly

And you want to go to bed?

Now we’re not afraid of monsters, so…

STOMP through the garage,

WALK through the hallway,

CLOSE the curtains,

OPEN the closet,

JUMP into bed,

And turn out the lights!  CLICK!

 

Book/Song

 

There Was an Old Monster by Rebecca Emberley

 

Use a puppet or a magnet board to show the monster eating all the different animals.  Song is available for download at scholastic.com.

 

Rhyme Time

 

Song: “If You’re a Monster and You Know it”

 

If you’re a monster, and you know it, wave your arms.

If you’re a monster, and you know it, wave your arms.

If you’re a monster, and you know it, then your arms will surely show it.

If you’re a monster, and you know it, wave your arms.

 

If you’re a monster, and you know it, show your claws…

 

If you’re a monster and you know it, gnash your teeth…

 

If you’re a monster and you know it, stomp your feet…

 

If you’re a monster and you know it, growl out loud…

 

Book

 

Glad Monster, Sad Monster by Ed Emberley

 

Give children simple masks or mask elements on popsicle sticks to add participation, or have them pretend to put on the face of each monster’s feelings.

 

Rhyme Time

 

Finger/Whole Body Play: “What Do Monsters Do?”

 

What do monsters do? 

They stretch and touch their toes.

What do monsters do?

They comb their purple hair.

What do monsters do?

They stick out their green tongues.

What do monsters do?

They brush their teeth with a broom.

What do monsters do?

They rub their yellow eyes.

What do monsters do?

They wiggle their orange ears.

Boy am I glad that I’m not a MONSTER!

 

Book/Interactive:

 

Go Away, Big Green Monster by Ed Emberley

 

Have children participate in repeated lines, particularly in telling the monster to go away.  Use a flannelboard to put the monster together and take him apart again.

 

*”Monster Mash” can be used as an activity during any rhyme time in the program.  Have them follow along to a simple dance, or let them dance. 

*Glad Monster, Sad Monster can be cut for time if needed.

 

Closing

Tune: “The More We Get Together”

 

It’s time to say goodbye now

Our storytime’s done.

Shaloam, Da Svidanya

We’ve had so much fun.

Adios, Sayonara, Auf Wiedersehen too

It all means goodbye now,

Goodbye now to you.

 

Activity

 

Option 1: Monster Masks

Have pre-cut masks for children to paint.

Children can embellish masks with buttons, noodles, sequins, glitter, stickers or any other materials on hand.

 

Option 2: Shape Monsters

Give each child a piece of black construction paper.  Provide an assortment of shapes in bright colors.

 

Children create their own monsters out of shapes and glue them onto the black paper.  They can decorate the black paper with white chalk or crayon if time permits.

(Craft ideas from A to Z Teacher Stuff)


References

 

Amber. 2011. “Best Answer” response to “Preschool teachers!!!!?” Answers.Yahoo.com. http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080723080322AAO7GGE

 

De Lira, Catherine. A. 2011. “Go Away, Big Green Monster! Activities.” A to Z Teacher Stuff. http://www.atozteacherstuff.com/pages/219.shtml.

 

Kathy.  2011.  “More Goodbye Songs” posted in “Lotsa Lesson Plans – Transitional Songs.” Hummingbird Educational Resources. http://www.hummingbirded.com/ transitional-music.html

 

Preschool Education. 2011. “Music and Songs: Monsters.” PreschoolEducation.com. http://www.preschooleducation.com/smonster.shtml

 

Yannucci, Lisa. 2011. “Some More Hello and Goodbye Songs with MP3 Recordings.” Mama Lisa’s World Blog.  Posted January 23, 2007.  http://www.mamalisa.com/ blog/some-more-hello-and-goodbye-songs-with-mp3-recordings/

 

Kindergarten (5 years)

Kindergarten Storytime: Whale of a Tale!

Welcome!

 Opening Song: “Good Morning Boogie”

Tune: “Good Night, Ladies”  Available on Dr. Jean Sings Silly Songs

 

Hello, neighbor        (Wave to partner)

What do you say?    (High 5)

It’s going to be a       (Slap thighs, clap hands)

Happy day                 (High 10)

Greet your neighbor            (Shake hands)

Boogie on down       (Wiggle hips)

Give a bump             (Bump hips)

And turn around      (Hokey Pokey circle)

 

Question: What you see at the beach or in the ocean

 

Rhyme Time

 

Song: “Take Me Out to the Ocean”

Tune: Take Me Out to the Ballgame

 

Take me out to the ocean

Take me out to the sea

There goes a starfish and sand dollar,

I’m having such fun, I’ve just got to holler

Oh, it’s swim, swim, swim underwater

Catch a ride on a whale, don’t fear

For the sea animals are our friends, so

Let’s give a great big cheer!

 

Book

 

Whale by David Lucas

Use a puppet or puppets with this story.

 

Rhyme Time

 

Song: “Swimming in the Sea”

Tune: “Doo-wa diddy diddy”  Keep the whale puppet out for this one and have him do the last line.

 

There I was just a-swimmin’ in the sea

Singin’ doo wah diddy diddy dum diddy do

All’a sudden there’s a whale right next to me

Singin’ doo wah diddy diddy dum diddy do

 

He swam fast, he swam fast

He dove deep, He dove deep

He swam fast, dove deep

Hey, this whale is pretty neat!

Doo wah diddy diddy dum diddy do

Doo wah diddy diddy dum diddy do

Spoken: Doo wah diddy diddy dum diddy do

 

Song: “Baby Beluga”

Available on Baby Beluga by Raffi.  Could also substitute “Under the Sea” from Disney’s The Little Mermaid

 

Actions: Put hands together, make a whale jumping over the waves

Baby Beluga in the deep blue sea,
Swim so wild and you swim so free.
Heaven above, and the sea below,
And a little white whale on the go.

Baby beluga, baby Beluga, is the water warm?
Is your mama home with you, so happy.

Way down yonder where the dolphins play,
Where they dive and splash all day,
The waves roll in and the waves roll out,
See the water squirting out of your spout.

Baby beluga, baby Beluga, sing your little song,
Sing for all your friends, we like to hear you.

When it's dark, you're home and fed,
Curl up snug in your water bed.
Moon is shining and the stars are out,
Good night, little whale, goodnight.

Baby beluga, baby Beluga, with tomorrow's sun,
Another day's begun, you'll soon be waking.

Baby Beluga in the deep blue sea,
Swim so wild and you swim so free.
Heaven above and the sea below,
And a little white whale on the go.
You're just a little white whale on the go.

 

Book

 

Peg and the Whale by Kenneth Oppal

 

Activity

 

Game: Fishing for a Whale

 

Have a bucket or buckets, depending on number of children.  Place several fish shapes and a whale shape or two in each bucket with paper clips in the noses.  Attach small magnets to fishing line or twine and tie to a dowel rod to make “fishing poles.” Have children try to catch fish (or the whale!) in the buckets.

 

Book

 

Dear Mr. Blueberry by Simon James

 

Rhyme Time

 

Song: “I Know a Mammal”

Tune: “Mary Had a Little Lamb”

 

I know a mammal that lives in the sea,

Lives in the sea, lives in the sea

I know a mammal that lives in the sea.

It’s a great blue whale.

 

Whales breathe air, but live in the sea

Live in the sea, live in the sea.

Whales breathe air, but live in the sea

Breathe like you and me!

 

Extra Book if Needed

 

The Snail and the Whale by Julia Donaldson

 

Closing

 

Chant: “See  You Later”

 

See you later, alligator.

After a while, crocodile.

In an hour, sunflower,

Maybe two, kangaroo.

Gotta go, buffalo.

Adios, hippos!

Chow, chow, brown cow!

See you soon, baboon!

Adieu, cockatoo!

Better swish, jellyfish.

Chop, chop, lollipop.

Gotta run, skeleton.

Bye, bye, butterfly.

Better shake, rattlesnake.

Storytime ends.

Goodbye, good friends.

See you next week!

 

Activity

 

Option 1:. Glittering Whales: Give children fish or whale silhouettes.  Let them create the details of their own fish by adding buttons, glitter, sequins, shiny wrapping paper and google eyes.

 

Option 2:

Paper Bag Whale: Children stuff most of a paper lunch sack with shredded newspaper.  With about three inches left, scrunch the top together and close with tape or a rubber band.  Children can paint the “body” and “tail” of the whale (not the stomach).  They can add flippers and a water spout made of  construction paper.  Children use markers and glue to add a face and wiggly eyes.

Source: http://www.dltk-kids.com/animals/mbagwhale.htm

 
References

 

Briggs, Diane. 1997. 52 Programs for Preschoolers: The Librarian’s Year-Round Planner. Chicago: American Library Association.

DLTK. 2011. “DLTK’s Crafts for Kids: Stuffed Paper Bag Whale.” DLTK’s Growing Together. http://www.dltk-kids.com/animals/mbagwhale.htm

Feldman, Jean. 2010. “ Hello and Goodbye” Lyrics: Dr. Jean Sings Silly Songs.  http://www.drjean.org/html/lyrics/lyricsHelloGoodBye.pdf

Karapetkova, Holly. 2005. “See You Later – May Activities.” DrJean.org. http://drjean.org/html/monthly_act/act_2005/05_May/seeYouLater.pdf

Preschool Education. 2011. “Music and Songs: Beach & Ocean.” PreschoolEducation.com. http://www.preschooleducation.com/ sbeach.shtml

Raffi and Debi Pike. 1996. “Baby Beluga.” Baby Beluga. Lyrics from NIEH Kids’ Pages. http://kids.niehs.nih.gov/lyrics/babybeluga.htm

Warren, Jean. 2010. “Music & Rhyme Station: Ocean Songs & Rhymes.” Preschool Express. http://www.preschoolexpress.com/music_station05 /music_station_jul05.shtml

 
 
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