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Reading Interventions

READING INTERVENTIONS

 

  • Give direct instruction in sound/symbol relationships.
  • Expose students to motivating, interesting, reading materials.
  • Give frequent and sustained opportunities for student to read both aloud and to themselves.
  • Practice recognizing and producing sounds.
  • Practice emphasizing the sound structure of words.
  • Use supplementary reading materials for students who fall behind expected levels.
  • Use materials that student can read to himself/herself easily, along with more difficult material to be read with teacher.
  • Assess students reading ability (both fluency and word recognition).
  • Model reading and comprehension strategies.
  • Give opportunities for student to build fluency through frequent practice reading different types of text such as newspapers, stories, reports, letters, and magazines.
  • Set a purpose for reading.
  • Work with student to recall background knowledge and apply it to new text.
  • Teach student how to scan material before reading (e.g., SQ3R method).
  • Use techniques to help student summarize frequently (e.g., Think, pair, share; one-sentence summaries, etc.)
  • Teach students to make text-to-text, text-to-self, and text-to-world connections.
  • Identify key terms before reading.
  • Give a list of questions for student to answer mentally before reading a new section of text.
  • Teach students to monitor their own understanding periodically.
  • Make visual representations to help them understand text (e.g., charts, webs, and graphs).
  • Provide individual or small-group instruction.
  • Provide student with opportunities for repeated reading of passages to increase fluency.
  • Give explicit instruction in skills not previously mastered.
  • Use books that contain predictable vocabulary and sentence structure.
  • Display metacognitive strategies in classroom.
  • Allow student time to reflect on what was read.
  • Ask student to make and test predictions.
  • Help student to practice using contextual analysis for unfamiliar terms.
  • Teach student how to identify organization and structure of text (e.g., cause/effect, sequential, order of importance, etc.).
  • Help student to set a goal for reading (e.g., be able to explain author’s point of view, find the author’s purpose, differentiate fact/opinion, etc.).
  • Use a before, during, and after reading graphic organizer to chart student comprehension.
  • Ask student to make predictions about possible sentences using background knowledge.
  • Help the student to rank main ideas in order of importance.
  • Provide a peer who will read with the student.
  • Integrate oral language and literacy in all subjects
  • Offer books at different levels of complexity
  • Use illustrations and charts to summarize text
  • Provide direct instruction on targeted skill
  • Practice and monitor skill mastery
  • Use small group, teacher-guided instruction
  • Use graphic organizers to introduce, develop, and review text
  • Cluster portions of the text and use phrased reading
  • Listen to a skilled reader or computerized text and then read
  • Highlight or draw attention to key points in text
  • Divide written material into chunks
  • Read and paraphrase short sections of text
  • Provide fluency practice
  • Use color overlays
  • Use a word window to help student focus on each word and part
  • Teach the student the most common prefixes and suffixes to add to root words
  • Use a word window to help student focus on each word and part
  • Enlarge font to make reading the text easier
  • Tape record a story for the student to listen to before reading independently
  • Use a highlighter to identify key words and phrases for the student to focus on
  • Highlight vowels, blends, etc.- whatever skill you are currently working on
  • Use tracking strategies when reading (fishing or flashlight)
  • Reading partners- 2nd grader can read with a first grader
  • Parent to pre-read a story at home with student so they are familiar with it
  • Provide questions prior to reading and give student sticky notes to mark the pages when they find the answer
  • Word Walls and Word Study

 Additional Resource: 

Catching Readers, Day-By-Day Small Group Reading Interventions, Barbara M. Taylor,                                                                                Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2010.

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