Handwriting Interventions

HANDWRITING INTERVENTIONS

 

  • Do not return handwritten work to be recopied.
  • Do not require a poor note taker to make arrangements with another student for notes.
  • Allow use of technology tools
  • Don’t penalize student for mixing cursive and manuscript (accept any method of production).
  • Accept alternate forms of reports - Differentiated Products
  • Reinforce the student for improving the quality of his/her handwriting based on his/her ability.  Gradually increase the amount of improvement expected for reinforcement as the student demonstrates success.
  • Provide a sample of what the finished paper should look like.
  • Allow for shorter assignments (Quality vs. Quantity).
  • Provide the student with an appropriate model of handwriting to use at his/her desk.  Teacher should model appropriate handwriting at all times.
  • Have the student trace handwriting models and fade the model as the student improves.
  • Gradually reduce the space between lines as student handwriting improves.
  • Use primary paper to assist the student in sizing upper and lower-case letters; use standard line paper when the skill improves.
  • Use paper that is also vertically lined to teach the student the appropriate spacing skills.
  • Use adhesive material (e.g., tape, Dycem material, etc.) to keep paper positioned appropriately for handwriting.
  • Use a pencil grip (e.g., three-sided, foam rubber, etc.) in order to provide the student assistance in appropriate positioning of pencil.
  • Put colored tape on parts of the pencil to correspond to finger positions.  Then put colored tape on the student’s fingernails and have the students match the colors.
  • Change the format of the materials from which the student copies (e.g., less material to a page, remove or cover pictures, enlarge print).
  • Highlight the baseline, top lines, and margins to help the student stay in the correct writing spaces.
  • Use a frame or window to cover all material except that which the student is to copy.
  • Make certain that the student’s formation of letters is appropriate and consistently correct.  In manuscript writing, all strokes progressing from top to bottom, left to right. Use a forward circle (circling to the right) for letters that begin with a line.  Use a backward circle (circling to the left) for letters in which the circle is written before the line (d).
  • Teach all letters that have the same stroke at the same time.  Do not teach b directly after a because they do not use the same stroke directionality.
  • Place letters on transparencies and project them on the chalkboard or paper.  Have students trace the letters.
  • Have the students keep a card with the word “bed” at his/her desk to help remember the correct form of b and d in a word he/she knows.
  • Given the letters and numbers on separate cards, have the student match pairs of letters and numbers.
  • Make certain the student has a number line and alphabet strip on his/her desk to use as a reference.
  • Provide older students with functional handwriting opportunities (e.g., job applications, order forms, check writing, etc.)
  • Have the student trace letters and numbers in magazines, etc., which he/she typically reverses when writing.
  • Have students keep a list of the most commonly used words which contain letters he/she reverses.  This list can be a reference when the student is writing.
  • Point out subtle differences between letters and numbers which the student reverses.  Have the student scan five typewritten lines containing only the letters and numbers that are confusing (e.g.,nnnnhnnnnnnh).  Have the student circle the “n’s” and “h’s” in different colors.  Make certain the students checks all his/her work for those letters which he/she typically reverses.  Reinforce the student for correcting reversed letters and numbers.
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