March 2012

Thursday - March 1

Experiment Design & Ethical Implications of working with Human Beings

Discuss Ethical implications of Human / Natural Science Experimentation.


Monday- March 5

Group 3 EE meeting, Thursday flextime 2:15
Business and Management (312) Economics (313) History (310) Geography (323) and Psychology (319) and World Studies: 314.  We will discuss appropriate research questions, look at sample Extended Essays and discuss internal deadlines for EE Group 3 students.

Discuss Human Science KI's

Discuss HS articles and inherent problems of the Human Science


Which problems seemed linked to perception and which to reason, language or emotion?


Human Science Issues - Everyone examine - Yellow Highlighted topics are most directly connected to perception.
  • Relevance & expectations 228-229
  • Observer Effect pp. 229, 261-264  concern about how others will perceive us
  • Measurement pp 264-267
  • Experiment design p. 268  and Complexity of Predictions p. 279-80  Link to reason: Causation versus Correlation
  • Bias / Confirmation Bias  pp. 230 & 278
  • Also see Verstehen Position pp 276-277 (Nacirema)   Perception of Self  and the concern about how others will perceive us

Research Methods 

Thursday, March 8

Group 3 EE meeting, Thursday flextime 2:15
Business and Management (312) Economics (313) History (310) Geography (323) and Psychology (319) and World Studies: 314.  We will discuss appropriate research questions, look at sample Extended Essays and discuss internal deadlines for EE Group 3 students.

Mini-Essay due next Monday!

The Economist - Broken Window's Theory


Time to work on Mini-Essay 2

Monday, March 12


Warm-up  - Previously brainstorm Strengths & Limitations - How might language be superior to perception as a Way of Knowing?  What seem to be the primary weaknesses of language as a Way of Knowing?

Begin Language - 

Primary Aoks - History, Arts & Human Science.

Links to WoK - Emotion & Reason.


Characteristics of Language- PPT -

 Meaning & Interpretation of Words - History / Human Science / Arts

  • Vagueness - not specific - meaning often depends on context or listeners "judgment/experience". Iraqi Law on Women in Government Jan 09

  • Ambiguity - open to multiple interpretations. Multiple meanings / words with similar spelling. Reasons why English is difficult to learnCoast Guard ltanguage Video clip, Madagascar 2,  Max (Blonda), Airplane (5:15 - 6:30, 7:45-9, 11:35-13:15, 36:30- 38)

  • Secondary meaning - words have connotations which differ from the denotation. Malcolm X.  Euphemisms are also used to soften how the listener understands - George Carlin video clip

  • Metaphors - open to interpretation and change over time. "One"/"One"lyrics

  • Irony - saying of one thing in order to mean the opposite.  Adds another layer of ambiguity.

All of the above implicate that much of what we "KNOW" via language is open to interpretation.  These also allow individuals to purposely manipulate language for their own ends.  These are particular issues within the AOK of History and Human Science.  Textbook examples of Interpretation & Meaning


Formative Task - Work with a partner - Find samples of writing from the "Arts" that you think clearly illustrates three of the five ways words / language can be open to interpretation.   For each sample include a caption that illustrates why you believe this is a clear example of the concept.  Period 1 Google Doc    Period 3 Google Doc
  • Vague
  • Ambiguous
  • Connotation differing from Denotation
  • Metaphors
  • Irony
Additional Instructions - Make sure you include enough of the example so we can see how it illustrates the idea.  You also may want to add a link to the longer work :)

Wednesday, March 14

Students should read TOK text pp 71-76 (beginning with Language and Values and reading through Language is Power)

Students should work together in small groups to make sure they understand the examples (pay particular attention to grey shaded boxes in text) provided for each of the following terms found in the reading:

           1.      Emotionally laden language

           2.      Weasel Words

           3.      Grammar

           4.      Revealing and Concealing

Students should work together to find specific examples of all four of these

types of language manipulation using the history books spread about the

room.  On a single document for the group students should:

 1.      Write down enough of the excerpt from the history book so it is clear how this example illustrates the type of language

2.      Write a brief explanation as to why you think this example illustrates the main idea

3.      Speculate why you thing the author choose to use this type of language in this case.

Students should print and turn in to you whatever they found at the end of the class.

Friday, March 16
  • Translation - "Lost in Translation" video clip,


    Look over these three in groups - what specific issue(s) do these bring up about translation between languages?

     Chiglish Slide Show - NYTimes,

     Chiglish Article

    Star Wars Subtitles,

     

    Play around with either GoogleTranslate or online translation website - what types of statements/language seem to be the most difficult to translate?


    Translations measured by faithfulness the original communication, Comprehensibility, ability to retranslate back to the original language.  

     

    Challenges:

    • Importance of Context to translations - Coast Guard language Video clip

    • Untranslatable terms - Bilingual students come up with examples.

    • Idioms/Slang/Metaphors - exercises page 62.


Tuesday, March 20


Theories of Meaning what distinguishes meaningful word from meaningless ones?

  • Definition - standard meanings but definitions are often vague, imprecise and are dependent on other word which themselves need defining. See IBO Knowledge issue

  • Denotation - a meaningful word is one that "stands" for something else.  EX:  France,  ISB, weasel, etc...   Not so useful for abstract words or words that are associated with past people, places & things.

  • Image meaning of word is the mental image one creates when using it. Perhaps useful to differentiate human language from animals that "speak".  Problem - no one consistent meaning between people.

HAL Rubric

More Sweeney examples:

  • Vague
  • Ambiguous
  • Connotation differing from Denotation
  • Metaphors
  • Irony
Past PT: As an IB student, how has your learning of literature and science contributed to your understanding of individuals and societies?

Discuss History & Language

Value laden Language - text pp. 71-75 Value Laden LanguageSwine Flu

  • Emotion - using connotation, euphemisms, metaphors, etc. to get an emotional reaction from reader/listener. Sarah Palin Quote  Arts

  • Weasel Words - many, should, probably - Study on Teen Drivers,Human Science.

  • Grammar - passive versus active verbs - Human Science & History

  • Revealing & Concealing - slang, euphemisms, etc...  p. 75

 

Discuss Language Formative Presentation

Length of presentation is 4-5 minutes. Again - format of presentation should be predominately interactive NOT stand and deliver.

Presentation must be focused on a Language KI - you are encouraged to make a link to Arts, History or Human Science. Opinion Polling...

Planning document due/Presentations begin on  Wednesday, March 28.  Planning document must include:

  • Knowledge Issue 
  • Summary of example(s) that will be used to illustrate the KI
  • Identification of how you plan to illustrate a second perspective.

The planning document and the actual presentation will be evaluated using this Mini presentation Rubric



Thursday, March 22


Lagemaat, pp.68-71  Sapir-Whorf materials 




Work on Presentations


Monday, March 26


Scientist - pp. 64-66  Advantages and Disadvantages of using labels.


  • How do labels enhance and/or interfere with acquisition of knowledge


  • Finish Discussing History & Language - see Japan/China examples - Japanese Internment


    Value laden Language -

    • Emotion - using connotation, euphemisms, metaphors, etc. to get an emotional reaction from reader/listener. Sarah Palin Quote  Arts

    • Weasel Words - many, should, probably - Study on Teen Drivers, link to Human Science.

    • Grammar - passive versus active verbs - Human Science & History

    • Revealing & Concealing - slang, euphemisms, etc...  p. 75

    History KI's


    Work on Presentation


    Examine Metaphors, etc on google docs.   Period 1 Google Doc    Period 3 Google Doc

    Other


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