High School/College/Careers

High School

 

High School News

The Office of Student Enrollment welcomes all rising eighth grade students and first-time ninth graders applying to high school for the 2017-2018 school year!

Get ready to apply to high school this fall by taking these next steps:

Visit Specialized High Schools to learn how to participate in that admissions process and the new diversity initiatives.


If you just moved to New York City or are not yet enrolled at a school for the 2016-2017 school year, visit a Registration Center from August 31 to September 16. You can find these locations and other important enrollment information on the New Students page.


High School

 

High School News

The Office of Student Enrollment welcomes all rising eighth grade students and first-time ninth graders applying to high school for the 2017-2018 school year!

Get ready to apply to high school this fall by taking these next steps:

Visit Specialized High Schools to learn how to participate in that admissions process and the new diversity initiatives.


If you just moved to New York City or are not yet enrolled at a school for the 2016-2017 school year, visit a Registration Center from August 31 to September 16. You can find these locations and other important enrollment information on the New Students page.

    High School Admissions Overview: How Do I Participate?

    New York City has more than 400 high schools and over 700 programs. Eighth grade or first-time ninth grade students and families who live in New York City complete a single High School Application for up to 12 high school programs and can participate in a separate process for Specialized High Schools.

    Students with disabilities may apply to any high school program in High School Admissions and follow the same steps outlined in theNYC High School Directory and Specialized High School Students Handbook as their nondisabled peers. Students with disabilities who are recommended for and have attended a District 75 program and are considering a high school outside of District 75 should work with their IEP team to determine whether the recommendation for District 75 for high school is still appropriate.

    Use the resources below to learn about your program options and understand the admissions process:

    High school resources are also available in translation:

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    New York City charter schools give families additional public school options and have a separate admissions process.  

    Find a High School: How Do I Learn About Programs?

    When looking for schools and programs, it is important to think about what will help you learn and grow—your interests, learning needs, and how you’d get to and from the school. Talk with your family, guidance counselor, and teachers about your application choices.

    2017 New York City High School Directory: The High School Directory helps you understand the admissions process and learn more about high school programs in each borough. You can pick up a copy from your middle school, at a High School Admissions event, or Family Welcome Center.

    School Search: Find high schools based on interest area, borough, school size, and more.

    Admissions Events: Attend a High School Family Workshop in July 2016, and the Citywide and Borough High School Fairs in the fall, to learn how to find programs that fit your needs, hear tips on developing your High School Application, and get to know more about theSpecialized High Schools admissions process.

    Information Sessions: View the calendar of high schools' information session dates and plan to visit schools of interest. 

    2016-2017 Specialized High Schools Student Handbook: You may also be interested in applying to one of the nine Specialized High Schools—learn about those programs and their admissions process. 

    Apply to High School: What Makes a Good Application?

    Applications for Round 1 of High School Admissions are due to guidance counselors on December 1, 2016.  Your goal is to receive an offer to one of your preferred programs in Round 1. Students who do not receive an offer in Round 1 can apply to programs with availability in Round 2 in March 2017.

    Take these steps as you develop a list of programs:

    • Read the High School Directory. Understand how high school offers are determined. Learn the meaning of terms like admissions priorities, eligibility, seats, admissions methods, guaranteed offer, and selection criteria. 
    • List programs that you believe will help you learn and grow. Think about your interests, learning needs, and how you would get to and from school.
    • List 12 programs on your application. Listing fewer than 12 programs makes it less likely you receive an offer from your application. Listing fewer programs does not make it more likely that you will receive a top choice.
    • List programs in your true order of preference starting with your top choice as #1. High schools cannot see where you rank them and should not ask where you’ve ranked them.  Your preference order matters!
    • Include “target” or “likely-match” programs on your application. If you have a guaranteed program, you should put it on your application after other programs you prefer.

    Admissions Timeline: When Do I Apply?

     
     Download the HS Admissions Timeline.


    College

    Students

    To Do:

    •  Think about college as an important part of your future. Discuss your thoughts and ideas with your family and with people at school.
    •  Start saving for college if you haven’t already.
    •  Take challenging and interesting classes to prepare for high school.
    •  Ask your parent or guardian to help you research which high schools or special programs will most benefit your interests.
    •  Develop strong study habits.
    •  Do your best in school and on standardized tests. If you are having difficulty, don’t give up—get help from a teacher, tutor, or mentor. 
    •  Become involved in school- or community-based activities that let you explore your interests and learn new things.
    •  Speak with adults, such as your teacher, school counselor or librarian, relatives, or family friends, who you think have interesting jobs. Ask them, “What do you like about your job?” and “What education did you need for your job?”

    To Explore:


    Parents

    To Do:

    •  Use FAFSA4caster to find out how much federal student aid your child might receive. This information will help you plan ahead.
    •  Continue saving for your child’s college education. If you have not opened a savings account, learn about the tax advantages of saving and find a link to a clearinghouse of state college savings plans.
    •  Talk to your child about his or her interests and help match those interests with a college major and career.
    •  Help your child develop good study habits, such as studying at the same time and place every day and having the necessary materials to complete assignments.
    •  Stay in contact with your child’s teachers and counselor so that they can let you know about any changes in your child’s behavior or schoolwork.
    •  Keep an eye on your child’s grades on his or her tests and report cards, and help him or her find tutoring assistance, if necessary.

    To Explore:

    Get tips from the following documents:

    •    Helping Your Child With Homework offers suggestions on assisting your child with successfully completing assignments.
    •    Helping Your Child Through Early Adolescence addresses issues that parents of 10- to 14-year-olds generally find most challenging.
    •  Browse Parent Power for ideas to help you support your child as he or she transitions into high school.

    • Career
    • Middle school is not too early to begin looking at some careers that may appeal to you. The earlier you can narrow down the field, the more time you have to explore your options and "try them on for size."

      Don't know where to begin? First, think of some things you enjoy doing and then use our interactive tool to find careers that match your skills.

      It is never too early to explore some career options.

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