XVI. Observations & Research

This section is for research, observations and thoughts on Imperial Free Hand & Lead Lustre.

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Four  Lead Lustre

Marbleized Vases


Left to right: 619 - 11, 618 - 11, 415 - 11 and 655 - 21

Decor 11:  Blue with opal swirled effect, green satin interior, satin lustre all over.

Decor 21: Blue with opal swirled effect, bright orange interior, not iridized.

A wide variation of marbleized effects/ variations are shown here, from 
light to dark and less "mixed" to more "mixed" colors. The 619 - 11 piece has an undocumented blue interior while the others have the documented satin green/blue and the orange interiors. The 618 - 11 example has satin lustre sprayed unevenly, with sections of the lower half not sprayed/iridized.
  

Author's Collection



 


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Lead Lustre 417
Undocumented Glaze
8" Tall










  This might well be a lustre glaze as 
  used / found on Free Hand examples. 


 

 



 

 
 

From the collection of Gary Senkar comes this Lead Lustre 655 vase with a very similar glaze treatment to the example above


 
 


 

 



Here is another example from Gary Senkar's collection of a vase with a similar lustre glaze / surface treatment. It has a 622 Lead Lustre shape but bears a Free Hand label.

 

                    Here is a FH 189 example and a FH 57                vase, both with lustre finishes.

    

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   All Three Lead Lustre
Marbleized Decors

(Shown on the 655 Shape)

 
  LL 655 - 11

Blue with opal swirled effect, 

green satin interiorsatin lustre all over





Examples also found with
 bright orange interiors 


 LL 655 - 14

Blue with opal swirled effect,

green satin interiorcoated with green 

iridescence


Examples also found with
 bright orange interiors 


  LL 655 - 21

Blue with opal swirled effect,

bright orange interior, not iridized



Examples also found with
green satin interiors




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First time pictured on this site and the first time in "captivity". Is it the Loch Ness Monster? Is it Sasquatch?   No, it's the (until now) elusive Lead Lustre 376 Bowl.  Since this site was established in 2009, I have searched for a photo of one. Thanks to Gary Senkar, I now have it & can share it.




Lead Lustre 376 - 40 Bowl
4.4"High by 8.6" Widest






Collection of Gary Senkar







 
                       
                   The base is smooth, i.e. it is NOT like this below:  

NOTES:
  • Smaller than described in Imperial documentation (5.25"H by 10" W). This is not unusual, occurs frequently.
  • The "40" decor (opal with yellow-green iridescence) is best seen on the photo of the bottom,  left.
  • Imperial documentation suggests there are at least two other decors.
  • There is one other Lead Lustre bowl shape, shown below:     

  • Both bowl shapes were sold as console sets, as well as separately.

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  Rare Lead Lustre 
Sales Catalog






To the right is an internet screen print photo of the front page of this catalog. This catalog pictures 15 examples of Lead Lustre glass as shown just below and on pages 476 - 478 of the Imperial Glass Encyclopedia, Vol. II





This is a never seen before photo of the front page.
 




 
Details of Note:

  • Called "Jewel Trial Lot" not Lead Lustre at this point, but described as "lead glass".
  • Priced wholesale at $66.00 for thirty pieces (two each of the 15 examples pictures), less a $4.75 discount, plus $1.25 for the shipping barrel equals $62.50 or $2.08 each piece ($25.00/dozen as shown). Discontinued/close out sales beginning in 1926 cut these prices by 50% or more.
  • All  documented Lead Lustre shapes and decors are not shown in the catalog below, e.g. no candlesticks or bowls, no Leaf & Vine decors and only five of the eight monochromatic decors.
  

 

 


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Free Hand Lamp
Leaf & Vine Decor
Excellent Glaze


Collection of Robert Stock

Photos left & right

These lamps are normally 22 inches tall 
including the hardware.




Below are other examples found on this website. Please note the hardware & top lip variations. The maker/makers of the hardware have 
not yet been identified.
 



 
 




 



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Lead Lustre Candlestick



Collection of Keith Fernandez


 
This site has a Lead Lustre candlestick pictured with a decor #10  brilliant blue mirror glaze (green/gold/ purple highlights)This example however is the first seen with a flat satin or matte finish. It has transparent blue base glass, as found on decor #10 examples.


 





Two of these  candlesticks were sometimes paired with a bowl to form a console set. Based on this candlestick and the brillant mirror blue one previously identified, the companion bowl might well look like the following
(shape of the top example and matte-like finish appearance of the bottom piece:


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LL 618 - 12  vase 

with yellow - green 

iridescent overspray

as on LL decor 14. 

It is undocumented.











Below is a 

documented 

LL 618 - 12 vase.




 




This is a documented 

LL 618 - 14 vase with

 the 
yellow - green

 iridescent 
overspray.







 
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    Some Free Hand Statistics


These numbers are based on the just over 300

unique FH examples currently found on this

website:


  -  The most frequently found decor is Leaf 

& Vine with 113 examples or almost 40%.


  -  Drag Loop is next with 62 examples or 

20%.


  -  Within Leaf & Vine the most frequently

found color combination is white LV on 

blue glass (34 examples).


  -  The least often found is red LV (5 

examples). Red LV has to date been found 

on three base glass colors.

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Iridized







Not Iridized





   


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Free Hand Baskets

Free Hand baskets are very rare. The Salesman's Special Lot pages picture only 10 baskets among the 271 different shape/decoration combinations available for purchase. If actual production matched proportionately, only about 4% of all Free Hand made would have been baskets. Given that the basket has traditionally been less popular than other shapes, e.g. the vase, it is likely that less than 4% of the Free Hand made was in fact baskets. 

This website currently has over 300 Free Hand examples, only six of which are baskets  - just less than 2%.








 
 













 

 

 

 
 

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14" H inc. Metal Mounts
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Blue base glass sprayed with

 dark blue/green iridescence, 

then white LV decor added,

then sprayed again with 

orange iridescence.




Free Hand Lamps



Here pictured are photos of 

three Free Hand lamps with the 

Leaf & Vine decor . All are the

 same undocumented shape but 

the example on the left appears 

to have a Special Lot #2003 

origin while the other two 

have a Special Lot #1990 

origin.



22" H inc. Metal Mounts




 


 
11" H inc. Metal Mounts
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White base glass with blue LV decor 

added, 
then sprayed with 

orange iridescence.



Factory Hole
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                                                                                         Elite Decorative Arts 

Free Hand & Lead Lustre Examples

 with the Same Finish



  
    On the left is a "mirrored" Free Hand #201 

    vase (8" H) and on the right a pair of Lead Lustre 

    3191 - 10 vases (10" H).  The finish they share in 

    common is referred to as "Brilliant Blue Glaze".



    This group may have been used as a console set

    at some point in time but it is not documented as 
 
    such.



    There are documented console sets that are 
 
    "marriages" of  Free Hand pieces and Imperial 

    Art Glass bowls - see below.



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Two FH 160 Vases
Salesman's Special Lot #1906

10.75" H

 

 

Very different surface treatments on these two examples. There are likely other surface treatments as well - as these vases were "married" with bowls from Imperial's Art Glass Line to form console sets.





 











As noted, the centerpiece bowl associated with this

console set is not Free Hand. It is "PA 77", an Imperial 

Art Glass Line piece. The Imperial Art Glass Line was made starting in 1916 and continued to be made throughout the 1920's. It is stretch glass. "PA" stands for Pearl Amethyst, a medium purple glass with multicolored iridescence, mainly blues, purples and reds. Immediately below is an example of Imperial Pearl Amethyst glass.


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Salesman's Special Lot #1906 consists, as shown above, of four console sets, each a marriage of  Free Hand pieces and an Imperial Art Glass Line centerpiece. Here is another set.



 


 
 

 FH 150
10" H


 
  This Imperial Art Glass Line bowl is a 
"PS 59" - same shape 59 as the diagram on the left but with a Pearl Silver "PS" finish, not a Pearl Amethyst "PA" finish. A Pearl Silver finish is a shiny, silvery iridescence (often with golden overtones) applied to a dark purple glass. Again, this is stretch glass.



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This is the third 
Special Lot #1906 console set.
 



 
 

FH 165
10.75" H










I believe this is an Imperial Art Glass Line
"54" shape, but I am unsure of the finish.


 

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This is the fourth and last console set 
shown in Special Lot #1906.



The bowl depicted above is a "PG" or Pearl Green example. Pearl Green is described as 
"crystal glass with green, rose, blue and yellow
effects mingled to a harmonious color combination." Immediately below are pictures of what might be a PG 76 bowl and a vase with a known Pearl Green finish.






 FH 164
10.75" H



 
A shape 76 Imperial Art Glass Line bowl in Pearl Silver is shown on page three of an Imperial Glass Company "Bargain Book" from the 1920's. 



 

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Free Hand or Lead Lustre ?

 
 

                                                             
This is one of those pieces that crosses/blurs the line between Lead Lustre & Free Hand. I believe this example 

started in a Lead Lustre Shape 618 mold and then was stretched and hand tooled. The apple green color to date

has only been seen on Lead Lustre pieces. I would call this "Lead Lustre 618 Variant with Apple Green Leaf & 

Vine Decor and Orange Crizzled Throat".


 
 
  Comparison with another of these

 Lead Lustre variants, in this case

originally a 3191 vase. Note how the

tops have been stretched to the point

 that the rims have become

 translucent. 



Comparison with a LL 618 Vase:

     6.5" H  & 6.25" H respectively                                   

 

 
 


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Threaded Double Amberina 

Shading Ruby to Amber to 

Ruby

Cobalt Lustre - 8 5/8" H 
 









This is another of those pieces that "blurs the line" between Free Hand

& Lead Lustre. 
It has a shape and height that closely approximate

Lead Lustre Shape 622, but is clear glass 
and has added threading. It

had to be carefully reheated to produce the 
double Amberina effect.

It could be Free Hand or Lead Lustre.
 
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This is probably a "one-of-a-kind" example.

 

It is on a Decor #60 mulberry colored 418 vase

with an unknown and extremely finely cut 

design.



If cut at the Imperial factory, this fine piece was 

probably the work of Telesphore Naome,who 

previously worked at Val St. Lambert in Belgium

& came to Imperial in 1925.



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Lead Lustre Candlestick 319 - 10 ?

Brillant Blue Glaze / Iridization
Multi - Colored Highlights
Blue Base Glass
9" H





 This may be the 5th candlestick decor identified
to date.  The other four are shown immediately below.
 


NOTE:  Look carefully at the "melted wax       catcher" rim on this example. It appears to have a much smaller diameter than the confirmed Lead Lustre candlesticks  - 
it may not be a candlestick ?

 




 
Lead Lustre candlesticks have been found with both "solid" and "crizzled stretch" tops. 

I believe there are three solid, non-
stretch decors, each associated with 

bowl shape 376. The remaining three 
candlesticks are stretch/crizzled 

lip variations associated with bowl shape 3762. 

 
 
 

  Imperial catalogs indicate that there were two different Lead Lustre console sets made, specifically

there were two different bowl shapes, each with what appear to be the same shaped candlesticks.

Each of these sets came in three colors, i.e. there were six different colors in total. 
Only a handful of the

bowls have turned up to date. They are all shape 3762 and only two of the three colors associated with

this shape have thus far been identified:
  

  Imperial catalogs indicate that there were two different Lead Lustre console sets made, specifically

there were two different bowl shapes, each with what appear to be the same shaped candlesticks.

Each of these sets came in three colors, i.e. there were six different colors in total.
Only a handful of

the bowls have turned up to date. They are all shape 3762 and only two of the three colors

associated with this shape have thus far been identified:



 
 
 
 
 


 

 

 

 

 


 

 


No examples in a 3rd 

color found yet.


     



 

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  The second Lead Lustre bowl shape, shape 376, is shown in Doug Archer's

book 
Imperial Glass. No examples have been positively identified yet. This is the

drawing shown in Archer's book:

 
 
 
 
Below is a bowl that roughly resembles the LL 376 but the bottom has a totally different 

mold structure from the LL 376. This example is actually an Imperial Jewels (aka 

Imperial Art Glass Line) #77 shape bowl with a LL #10 finish. Thanks Gary Senkar.
 

 

 

 



   

 



 
 



 





 



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Here are six fine examples of Imperial 

Free Hand and three great Lead Lustres -

 all with Imperial's "Leaf & Vine" or 

"Lily Pad & Vine" decor. These are often

 incorrectly referred to as "heart & vine".




When you "Google" the internet for 

"heart & vine" you can find many

 wonderful examples in that generic 

decor - by other makers including

 Tiffany, Durand, Fostoria, Fenton and

 Steuben.

 











Below find six examples

by these other makers. 

Some of these pieces may

 have been created by the 

same men that worked at 

Imperial.
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Lead Lustre Reprise




Lead Lustre was much less expensive than Free Hand, i.e. wholesale Free Hand had sold twelve pieces for $50.00 in the 1920’s, while the same $50.00 got you twenty-four pieces of Lead Lustre. For me and probably most others, cheaper, when it comes to art, equates to poorer quality and less desirability.  While Free Hand undeniably will remain generally more expensive and more highly regarded than Lead Lustre, taking a closer look at Lead Lustre can substantially narrow that perception gap. 


The quality of some Lead Lustre decors and the technical skill required to produce them matches Free Hand in

every respect in my estimation - except for the skill needed to create the initial form. In art pottery, Rookwood 

Pottery for example, a simple rectangular plaque can cost more than a hand thrown vase.  It is the artistic quality of the decoration and its scarcity that impact its desirability and price, along with knowing the name of the creating artist; something not known with either Lead Lustre or Free Hand. 


I have therefore given some thought as to why Lead Lustre was so much less expensive than Free Hand to 

make. There are a number of variables not all of which relate to quality. The possibilities include:


              - The number of artists capable of hand blowing the Free Hand forms, their rate of production and their                   salaries versus those that made Lead Lustre. 

              - Another factor might well have been a clever business model wherein potential wholesale buyers of                     Lead Lustre were encouraged to purchase an assortment versus a more “individual piece” marketing                   strategy for Free Hand. Specifically the inclusion in the assortment of some relatively simple and                           easier to make non - cased, monochromatic pieces would drive down the average price for an                               assortment.


I hope the information and photos I have provided here will help enhance an appreciation for Imperial’s Lead Lustre art glass.



I have spent the last week or so closely examining the Lead Lustre vases in my possession, some of which are


shown above. The results of this effort have left me with a greater appreciation for the creative thought and


technical skill that went into the making of this line. 



This is in some respects an initial effort to "peel the onion" back another layer regarding Lead Lustre; 


primarily to explore the lustres used and the effects of lustres on different colors of glass, thickness of lustre 


application on appearance, etc.. I do not believe this has been done before. As a fledgling effort, I am sure I 


have/will make many mistakes. I'm equally sure however that over time, with the help of others and perhaps 


the discovery of factory records, this effort will be improved.



Here then are my observations, including a detailed description of each of the 23 documented Lead Lustre


decors; comments and/or possible corrections are welcome - elamaa@netzero.net.



  • Bone white glass, lead glass, was used as the base glass in 19 of the 23 decors and in the decoration of 
      three of the remaining four decors, i.e. opal in marbleizing or opal festoons. Hence the "lead" in Lead Lustre. 

      The only decor without white glass is decor #10.

  • Both lustres and/or iridescent finishes can be found somewhere on all 23 decors. Hence the "lustre"    
      in Lead Lustre: 


                  Lustre a uniform, shiny finish on the surface of transparent or opaque glass. 
                               Lustre may be clear, colored, glossy or even have a satin finish,e.g. I have identified 
                               two satin lustres used on certain Lead Lustre decors, clear satin and pale blue satin. 
                               Lustres may be iridized, not iridized, or appear iridized, i.e. sometimes this is not a metallic                                    shine but instead resembles the shimmer seen on a soap bubble. 

                  Iridescent Lustres - Hot or reheated glass is sprayed with a liquid solution of metallic salts (different 
                                salts produce different colors). The liquid burns off leaving a fine metallic film on the 
                                surface of the glass The iridescent spray was called "dope". On Lead Lustre pieces, this 
                                iridescence is most often orange and found on the interior throats of pieces.

  • Here are close-ups of some documented & undocumented Lead Lustre examples; the lustre names I'm using are not documented. Note that Imperial's stretch glass had many names, often based on the brilliance, color and overall effect that doping and reheating imparted to the glass. These names included Rubigold, Azur, Helios, Nuruby, Saphire, Peacock, Purple Glaze and satin colors such as Rose Ice, Blue Ice, Amber Ice, Green Ice, Iris Ice and others. Colors in all Carnival Glass, including Imperial's, are determined by the color of the glass, not the iridescence.

   Iridescent Metallic
Orange Lustre



Pale Blue Satin Lustre


Clear Satin Lustre 


   Iridized Metallic
Blue - Green Lustre


 Iridized Metallic 
Yellow - Green Lustre


 Glossy Light Orange
Lustre
(on blue & white glass)

  Plain Finish
Canary & Opal Glass
Not Iridized or Lustred


 
 Orange & Crizzled Canary Glass
Satin Lustre Finishes


Yellow-Green Adventurine
on Opal Glass
Clear Satin Lustre Finish 


   Metallic Iridized 
Mirror Blue Finish
Multi-Color Highlights


 Plain Finish
Blue & Opal Glass
Not Iridized or Lustred


Metallic Yellow-Green
Iridescent Lustre
 
Pink, Purple & Orange Highlights
Lightly Iridized Gray Throat


   Metallic Orange Iridescent Lustre
Wheel Cut #94
Exposed Bone White Glass




Pale Blue Satin Lustre
 
Blue & Opal Glass


Iridescent Violet Lustre
Pale Blue Spider Webbing
Amberina Glass




  Olive Green Adventurine
& Opal Glass 
Iridized Violet Silver Lustre
Transparent Mustard Yellow Throat


 Opaque Pale Chartreuse Glass
Blue Lily Pads & Vines
Iridescent Glossy Apricot Lustre




Iridescent Metallic 
Crizzled Orange Lustre
on Opal Glass



   
Plain Mulberry Glass
Not Iridized or Lustred
Iridescent Metallic Orange Throat





Transparent Blue Glass
Mirror Blue Finish
Abstract Opal Glass
Glossy Orange Lustre Over All



Iridescent Orange Satin Lustre
Over Opal & Blue Glass 



   

Opal & Blue Marbleized Glass
Pale Blue Satin Lustre


Crizzled Iridescent
Metallic Orange Lustre
Dark Green Glass 
with Mica Particles



Plain Finish
Burgundy & Green Glass
Not Iridized or Lustred 


   Olive Green Adventurine 
& Opal Glass 
Iridized Metallic
Violet Silver Lustre


Bone White Glass
Glossy Mottled Gray Lustre
Metallic Orange Throat 


 

 Blue & Opal Glass
Metallic Silver Satin Lustre

  • Lead Lustre lustres, some or most, were used on Free Hand. I have found it difficult in some instances to accurately identify the same lustre from piece to piece on Lead Lustre examples and have just started comparing Lead Lustre to Free Hand lustres. In some instances these lustre identification issues are because the same lustre may appear differently based on several factors, such as the color of the glass underneath, two different lustres incorporated into the same piece (double doping), or the thickness or thinness of the application of the lustre; my abilities and the limited numbers of examples available to me are also factors. Here are a few examples:
 


Lead Lustre 
       
 



I believe both of these 
examples, left & right, have
 the same lustre:

   Iridized Metallic
  Violet Silver Lustre
 

Free Hand

 
 Lead Lustre
 
I believe both of these 
examples, left & right, have
 the same lustre:

   Pale Blue Satin Lustre

but I believe the FH 247 example
right also has an underlying
additional lustre, perhaps an Iridescent Violet Lustre
on the cobalt blue glass.



Free Hand 

 

 Lead Lustre
 
I believe both of these 
examples, left & right, have
 the same lustre:

Iridescent Metallic 
Orange Lustre

but the FH 295 right also has
an underlying Iridescent Violet 
Lustre on the cobalt blue glass.
It has been double doped.
(see the photo bottom right)


Free Hand 
 
 

 
Lead Lustre
 

I believe both of these 
examples, left & right, may
have the same lustre:

Clear Satin Lustre Finish

Both  examples are decorated
with yellow-green adventurine
glass. The opal base glass left vs. the transculent, almost crackle glass right affect the visual perception. Another
possibility is that the
Free Hand example 's lustre is

Metallic Yellow-Green 
Iridescent Lustre
 





Free Hand

  Lead Lustre

The Lead Lustre example left
has a Glossy Light Orange
Lustre. The FH 243 example 
right has the same glossy 
surface but there is a more 
underlying "textured" 
appearance to it; perhaps 
Iridescent Metallic Orange 
Lustre under Glossy 
Orange Lustre or under
a Clear Lustre?
 
 Free Hand
  Lead Lustre
 The Free Hand example right is at least double doped. Possibilities are:

Iridized Metallic
  Violet Silver Lustre

&
Satin Yellow-Green 
Iridescent 
 Lustre 

on the transparent base glass

Free Hand 

  • 14 of the 23 documented decors are cased glass. I therefore changed the name of the undocumented "Cased" Lead Lustre category to "Cased with Cut Top" Lead Lustre. This undocumented category represents a different production/technical process, i.e. these pieces were blown from the top and then cut off versus being "stuck up" for finishing.
  • 12 of the 23 decors have throats finished with a bright orange iridescence and 4 others have iridescent satin orange coating on the throats. These finish differences have no esthetic value in my 
      opinion, i.e. they look almost the same - with the metallic versus satin aspect not significant. Three of the

      decors with satin throats (#32, #38 & #61) have otherwise identical decors (#30, #35 & #60) with metallic

      orange throats.

  • The remaining 7 throat finishes, all iridescent, are dark blue (decors #10,#11,#12), gray (decor #44), canary satin (decor #37) and yellow-green (decor #14 & #51).

   
Decor #
 
Documented Description

Comments
   
5

Outside plain dark green finish, 

inside opal bright red




This is cased glass. The inner layer is bone white glass. The

outer, bright green layer is not lustred or iridized.  The 

interior throat has a sprayed on, iridescent orange finish.  

As with some other Lead Lustre decors, the rim has been 

wiped to expose the underlying white glass - giving the 

appearance of an applied rim.



 
 6

Outside plain dark green finish, inside

opal bright red, with opal leaf & web

decoration, satin finish


 

This is cased glass, a bone white inner layer covered with a 

deep green layer of glass. The outer green layer is decorated 

with opal glass in the leaf & web pattern. This is covered 

with a pale blue satin lustre. The throat has a sprayed

on, iridescent orange finish. Note that the satin finish is a 

lustre; the glass has not been acid etched. As with some other 

Lead Lustre decors, the rim has been wiped to expose the 

underlying white glass - giving the appearance of an applied

rim.


   
10

Dark blue with brilliant glaze, inside 

and outside

 


This decor was among the least complicated to make but very

striking in appearance - transparent blue glass sprayed with 

metallic oxides that produced an iridized, brilliant mirror blue 

finish with purple, violet, gold & green highlights - inside 

and outside.


 
 
   
11

Blue glass with fancy opal decoration, 

satin all over


This is cased glass. The inner layer is bright blue. This is 

covered in a mixed/marbleized layer of blue and opal. That 

is then covered with a pale blue satin lustreThe throat has 

sprayed on, iridescent dark blue finish with yellow and 

green highlights. Note that the satin finish is a lustre; 

the glass has not been acid etched.



 
 
12


Blue glass with four opal festoons, 

satin all over



This is not cased glass. It is dark blue base glass with opal 

festoons applied over the blue. Both the interior throat of the 

vase as well as the exterior then had a pale blue satin lustre 

glaze added as a final coat. Note that the satin finish is a 

lustre; the glass has not been acid etched.



   
14

Blue glass with fancy opal decoration, 

bright green all over

 
This is cased glass. The base glass is transparent blue that 

was then cased in a mixed/marbleized layer of darker blue 

and opal. Then a final thin film of glossy/iridized 

metallic yellow-green lustre was applied as top coating - 

inside as well as on the exterior of the vase.




 

 20


Plain opal, bright red glaze all over 




This decor was among the least complicated to make - bone 

white base glass sprayed to produced an iridescent metallic 

orange finish, both inside at the throat and on the outside. 

Subtle color variations create a very pleasing overall 

appearance.


   
21

Opal with blue fancy decoration, 

bright red inside only



This is cased glass. The base glass is bone white glass that 

was then covered in a mixed/marbleized layer of darker blue 

and opal. Then third layer (a thin, glossy, non-iridescent

lustre of very light blue) was applied as top coating. The 

throat has a sprayed on, iridized orange finish.



   
22
 
Opal with four blue festoons, red 

glaze all over



Four blue festoon groupings were applied over bone white

base glass, then a thin, glossy, lustre of very light orange 

was applied as top coating. The throat has a sprayed on, 

darker orange coating.



 
 25

Opal with green leaf & web

decoration, satin outside, red inside 

               


These are not cased glass pieces. Green glass (two 

different shades found) in the leaf and web pattern 

has been applied over the bone white base glass.  

The yellowish green glass has adventurine. Both 

decor colors are covered with a clear satin finish 

lustre. Note that the satin finish is a lustre; the glass

has not been acid etched. The throat has a sprayed  

on, iridescent orange finishAs with some other Lead 

Lustre decors, the rims have been wiped to expose the 

underlying white glass - giving the appearance of an 

applied rim (not as much contrast because of the 

predominantly white exterior of these pieces).


     



                              
 
 29

Plain blue glass with opal leaf & web 

decoration, opal edge, not iridescent 


 
This is cased glass, a bone white inner layer covered with a 

deep blue layer of glass. The outer blue layer is decorated 

with opal glass in the leaf & web pattern.  The exterior is not 

iridized or lustred. The throat has sprayed on, iridescent 

metallic orange finish. As with some other Lead Lustre

decors, the rim has been wiped to expose the underlying 

white glass - giving the appearance of an applied rim.




 
 30

Plain blue outside, opal with bright

red glaze inside 



This is cased glass. There is a bone white inner glass layer 

covered with deep blue glass. The blue glass is not lustred or

iridized. The interior throat has been sprayed with a metallic

iridescent orange coating. As with some other Lead Lustre 

decors, the rim has been wiped to expose the underlying

white glass - giving the appearance of an applied rim.



 
 31

Opal with gray iridescence outside, 

bright red inside


 
This is not cased glass. The base glass is bone white. Then a 

gray-purple lustre glaze (not iridized in my opinion, or very

lightly iridized at most ) was  applied to the exterior surface.

The interior throat has been sprayed orange. As with some

other Lead Lustre decors, the rim has been wiped to expose

the underlying white glass - giving the appearance of an 

applied rim.


   
32

Plain blue outside, opal with satin

red glaze inside 



This is cased glass. There is a bone white inner glass layer 

covered with deep blue glass. The blue glass is not lustred or

iridized. The interior throat has been sprayed with an

iridescent satin orange coating. As with some other Lead 

Lustre decors, the rim has been wiped to expose the

underlying white glass - giving the appearance of an applied 

rim.

   
35

Plain canary outside, opal with bright

red iridescence inside 


 
Bone white base glass cased in a chartreuse or "canary 

yellow" outer layer. The outer layer is not lustred or iridized.

The interior throat has been sprayed an iridized orange. 



Note that at the very center of the pontil a much more 

vibrant canary yellow color can be seen. 

I can not explain this.
 
 36

Plain canary outside with four opal 

festoons, opal with bright red 

iridescence inside 


Bone white base glass cased in chartreuse or "canary yellow" 

glass. Four opal festoon groupings were applied over the 

canary yellow. The outer layer is not lustred or 

iridized. The interior throat has been sprayed an iridescent

orange. 


 
 37

Opal with satin red iridescence outside, 

canary satin inside 




I believe this is likely the most rare Lead Lustre decor. Bone 

white base glass with an iridescent orange exterior finish. 

This finish has a dull, rough texture at the top that becomes 

shiny and smooth at the bottom, with some evidence of a 

crazing effect. The interior (flaired wax ring in the case of this

candlestick) has a canary satin finish - the stretched and 

flaired wax ring emphasizes the green component of the 

canary yellow (chartreuse) glass.




   
38
 
Plain canary outside, opal with bright

red satin iridescence inside

 

Bone white base glass cased in a chartreuse or "canary

yellow" outer layer. The outer layer is not lustred or iridized.

The interior throat has been sprayed an iridized satin orange. 



 
 40

Opal with bright green iridescence 

outside, bright red inside




This is not cased glass. It is bone white glass covered on the 

exterior with a sharp metallic yellow-green iridescence that 

has pinkish purple & orange highlights. The interior throat 

has been sprayed an iridized metallic orange.  Note that 

the lower portion of these pieces has been left white.





 
 44

Opal with bright green iridescence 

outside, gray inside


 
This is not cased glass. It is bone white glass covered on the 

exterior with a sharp metallic yellow-green iridescence that 

has pink, purple & orange highlights. The interior throat

has been sprayed gray-purple, matching decor 31's exterior.




 
 51

Plain dark green outside, opal bright 

green inside 


             No Photo Available

  

Decor 51 exterior color           Decor 51 interior color
  
like this exterior                      like this exterior color


 
 
60


Plain mulberry glass outside, opal

with bright red glaze inside 




This is two layers of glass, i.e. cased glass,  root beer brown

over bone white base glass. The exterior is not iridized or

lustred while the interior throat has been sprayed an iridized

orange.



 
 61

Plain mulberry glass outside, opal

with red satin inside 
 



This is two layer of glass, i.e. cased glass,  root beer brown 

over bone white base glass. The exterior is not iridized or

lustred while the interior throat has been sprayed an iridized 

satin orange. 




 


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