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Eh 200: Spring 2012

Course Outline with Teacher Notes/Videos

Instructors Please Note: Rather than use a course calendar this semester, I have compiled the various class-by-class outlines into a folder where the individual classes are numbered. This is to make the documents more flexible, and better able to meet the practical demands that impact content delivery. Also, please note that the spring semester is one week shorter than the fall semester.


Unit One


Week 1:     01/22-01/25

Overview: In this first week, teachers will spend time introducing students to the course, reviewing the first story, and exploring the relevance of literature to the general education curriculum.

During this week, teachers will want to review plagiarism policies carefully. Teachers will also want to have students write for them this first week, so teachers can see how their students write and what struggles they have. Please do stress the writing lessons of EH 123/124 during this week and throughout the semester. If you do not know what these are, please contact either Dr. Sands of Dr. Crowley. Teachers will also want students to begin the course with a reflection on what their current understanding of literature is and why it is significant (or not significant) to their professional development.

Assignments to Cover Week 1:

  • Review course syllabus and policies.
  • Writing Sample (journal) on the significance of literature.
  • Alice Walker's “Everyday Use” (The Haves and Have-Nots 456-467) and Susan Farrell's “Fight Vs. Flight.”


Week 2:   01/28 - 02/01

Overview: In this second week, teachers should have students begin to draft a précis on “Fight Vs. Flight,” but should first address the assignment and deliver step-by-step instructions on how to compose this document with examples. Teachers should check peer reviews to ensure that revision is taking place during this early stage.

Teachers should require some in-class journaling to encourage discussion of the writing process. Discussions can be organized in small groups and class discussions.

Assignments to Cover Week 2:

  • Students compose/address questions about the writing prompt
  •  Address good writing habits and the importance of the writing process.
  • Discuss the goals of the précis and have the students draft the situation and issue sections.

·         Teachers may even have students work in small groups on some questions related to “Fight Vs. Flight” and have them present their findings informally.


Week 3:     02/04 - 02/08 

Overview: In this third week, the class will be wrapping up the first draft of the précis and should begin discussing the major areas of concern in their early work: e.g., quotation, citation, Toulmin-model paragraphing, MLA conventions. During this third week, teachers should also have the students re-visit the article in class to address questions of Farrell’s rhetorical techniques (e.g., pathos, ethos, logos).

In addition to the emphasis on the précis, class discussions should address how the social issues under discussion in “Fight Vs. Flight” can be related to the students' own college experience.

Assignments to Cover Week 3:

  • Journaling activities on the writing process.
  • Group Discussions of the writing process.
  • Class Discussions and Mini-Lectures on key writing issues relevant to the précis draft.
  • Complete first draft of the précis and be on track to submit a second draft for the beginning of week.

Week 4:    02/11 – 02/15 

Overview: In this fourth week, teachers will help students engage in the revision and editing process. Early in the week, teachers will want to provide feedback on essays while students  are working on peer review in class. By the middle of the week, students will have feedback from both peers and their teacher, and be ready to compose the final draft of the précis. Along the way, students should complete a revision worksheet, making a plan for revision based on feedback and their own assessment. At the end of the week, they will be given the Nancy Tuten article to read and process.

It is also helpful to provide a mini-grammar workshop relevant to grammar issues students are having. This is a good time to do this, as students will now have the opportunity to apply any grammar lessons immediately to their own writing. For the first grammar lesson of EH 200, I try to spend time on sentence boundary errors (run-ons, comma splices, fused sentences, and fragments). Research indicates these are not only among the most common errors students make but also highly stigmatized errors both inside and outside of academic settings. I also encourage students to read their essays in reverse as a part of a good editing process. In the past, I have had students do this in class and show me their findings. This is also a great time to answer questions about issues related to grammar and usage.

The “final” draft of the précis is due at the end of this week. The day the assignment is due, teachers should also have students complete an in-class, meta-cognitive reflection of their process. This reflection will require students to think about the assignment and make connections to prior and future learning. Students should share from their reflections in class in order to help meet the oral presentation outcome of the course.

Assignments to Cover Week 4:

  • Peer Review Workshop
  • Revision workshop
  • Editing Workshop
  • Précis due
  • Meta-cognitive reflection

Week 5:     02/18 – 02/22  

Overview: In the final week of unit one, students will consider two new arguments on “Everyday Use.” They will consider the basic thesis statements in each article, the major supporting points, and the rhetorical conventions – both effective and ineffective – the authors use to substantiate their arguments. At the end of the week, students will take an end of unit exam.  

Assignments to Cover Week 5

  • Journal/Group/ and class activities on article by Nancy Tuten
  • Journal/Group/ and class activities on article by John Grusser
  • Unit One Examination

 

Unit One Resources:

  • Course Policy and Procedures
  • Syllabus
  • Alice Walker's "Everyday Use" (The Haves and Have-Nots 456-67)
  • Susan Farrell's "Fight Vs. Flight: A Re-Evaluation of Dee in Alice Walker's 'Everyday Use'" (See Eh 200 Resource E-Mail)
  • Nancy Tuten's Alice Walker's " Everyday Use" (See Eh 200 Resource E-Mail)
  • John Gruesser's "Walker's 'Everyday Use'" (See Eh 200 Resource E-Mail)
  • Precis Assignment (See Precis Resources)
  • Precis Samples (See Precis Resources)
  • Precis Grading Rubric (See Precis Resources)
  • Precis Peer Review Sheet (See Precis Resources)
  • End of Unit Exam (See End of Unit Exams)


Unit Two:

Week 6:     02/25 – 03/01 

Overview: In this first week of the second unit, students begin assignments centered around the text “Maggie: A Girl of the Streets” by Stephen Crane. During this first week, teachers should have students read the story and annotate the story. Students should complete a journal assignment/group discussion activity for each reading assignment, and class discussions should address these activities in some detail.

Assignments to Cover Week 6:

  • Read “Maggie: A Girl of The Streets”
  • Complete Journal/group/class discussion assignments for each reading assignment
  • Class discussions of readings

 

Week 7:     03/04 – 03/08

Overview: In this second week of the second unit, students will finish reading “Maggie: A Girl of The Streets” and begin to consider criticism of the text by Stallman and Al-Shalabi. Students should be reading, journaling, and arguing with these essays as individuals and in groups. This work will set the stage for their Guided Argument, which they will begin to address at the end of the week.

Assignments to Cover Week 7:

  • Read Stallman and Al-Shalabi
  • Journal assignments and group discussions for each article – which should be focused on the rhetoric in each article (thesis, subclaims, warrants, etc.)
  • Mini-Lectures on each article
  • Students compare and contrast the apparent merits of each of the arguments.

 

03/11 - 03/15 Spring Break


Week 8:     03/18 – 03/22 

Overview: In this third week of the second unit, students will focus on drafting their Guided Arguments. Teachers will want to spend time in class discussing thesis statements and how they arise from issues. Teachers will also want to emphasize the students can pull from a prompt and a reading to develop a strong, assignment specific thesis statement. After the thesis workshop at the end of the week, students should complete a rough draft of their essays over the weekend to prepare for the writing workshops of week 9.

Assignments to Cover Week 8:

  • Read and discuss the prompt for the Guided Argument.
  • Draft thesis statements and major sub-claims – with identified evidence to support.
  • Journaling and class discussions of themes, arguments, and rhetorical strategies for arguing about the text.

Week 9:     03/25 - 03/29

Overview: Teachers will help students engage in the revision and editing process. Early in the week, teachers will want to provide what I call "quick peek" feedback on students' essays while they are working on peer review in class. If teachers can have students bring two hard copies of their essays, this will give teachers an opportunity to make sure students are on the right track with their drafts before completing revision and engaging in the editing process. By the middle of the week, students will have feedback from both peers and their teacher. With this in mind, students should complete a revision worksheet, making a plan for revision based on feedback and their own assessment.

It is also helpful to provide a mini-grammar workshop relevant to grammar issues students are having. This is a good time to do this, as students will now have the opportunity to apply any grammar lessons immediately to their own writing. I also encourage students to read their essays in reverse as a part of a good editing process. In the past, I have had students do this in class and show me their findings. This is also a great time to answer questions about issues related to grammar and usage.

The second draft of the guided argument is due at the end of this week, though another revision will be due within one week after being returned. On the last day of this unit, the day the assignment is due, teachers should also have students complete an in-class, meta-cognitive reflection of their process (sample assignment provided). This reflection will require students to think about the assignment and make connection to prior and future learning. Students should share from their reflections in class in order to help meet the oral presentation outcome of the course.

Assignments to Cover Week 9:

  • Peer review workshop
  • Revision workshop
  • Editing workshop
  • Persuasive essay due
  • Meta-cognitive reflection
  • Informal presentation

 Week 10:    04/01 - 04/05

Overview: In this final week of the second unit, teachers will lead students through the final draft of the guided argument and present the class with an end of unit exam.

Assignments to Cover Week 10:

  • Drafting activities to get students from the second to final drafts of paper two.
  • Unit review
  • End of Unit Exam
Unit Two Resources:
  •  Stephen Crane's "Maggie: A Girl of The Streets" (The Have and Have-Nots 219-84)
  • Robert Stallman's "Stephen Crane's Revision of Maggie: A Girl of The Streets." (See Eh 200 Resource E-Mail)
  • Joseph S. Salemi's Down a Steep Place into the Sea: Suicide in Stephen Crane's Maggie" (See Eh 200 Resource E-Mail)
  • Nazmi Al-Shalabi's "Authenticity and Role-Playing in S. Crane's Maggie: A Girl of The Streets" (See Eh 200 Resource E-Mail)
  • The Guided Argument Assignment
  • The Guided Argument Rubric
  • The Guided Argument Samples
  • The Guided Argument Peer Review Sheet
  • End of Unit Exam

 

Unit III


Week 11:    04/08 - 04/12

Overview:  Unit Three begins with a discussion of what the novel is, what separates it form the short story, and why novel reading is an important activity for professionals. Much of this first week is dedicated to reading assignments from the novel. This outline assumes the class is reading Stephen King’s Carrie, though texts that have been approved by the department can also be used as long as they are established before the beginning of the semester.  By the end of the week, students should have made significant progress through the text.

Assignments to Cover Week 11:

  • Novel reading and annotation
  • Journal assignments/group discussions/ class discussions and mini-lectures on each reading assignment . Mini-lectures should be focused on making connections between the text and the students’ experiences.

Week 12:    04/15 - 04/19

Overview: Students are assigned the rest of the novel and are introduced to the prompt for the final paper, the research argument. 

 Week 13:     04/22 - 04/26     

Overview: Students are introduced to the research process and the resources that are available in our library. If possible, it is a good idea to have our head librarian come to your class to discuss the research process with students. As the week progresses, students collect academic resources for their papers that can be associated with either the establish literary criticism on the novel, on a social issue or issues that relate to the novel that the student wants to explore, or to scholarly works that make strong connections between some aspect of the text and some knowledge the students have learned as part of their general education curriculum at Husson University. Drafting begins mid-week, and the student should have a complete first draft completed by the beginning of the next week.

Assignments to Cover Week 13:

  • Journal assignments/group work/ class discussion on the phases of the research and writing processes.
  • Peer review of potential sources and thesis statements.
  • General discussions of possible issues in the novel that could lead the students to specific, contestable thesis statements.  

Week 14:    04/29 - 05/03

Overview: Students begin the week identifying the parts of their own arguments (Issue, Thesis, Sub-Claims, Evidence, Warrants) and discussing the current strengths and weaknesses of the drafts. Peer review  follows, and they are given a chance to revise their paper one more time before it is submitted as a first draft.  By the end of the week, students should be onto their second draft.

Assignments to Cover for Week 14:

  • Journal assignments/group work/ class discussion on the phases of the research and writing processes.
  • Peer review of potential sources and thesis statements.
  • General discussions of possible issues in the novel that could lead the students to specific, contestable thesis statements. 

Week 15:    05/06 (Last Day of Class

Overview: In this final week, students complete the third and final draft of the Research Paper and Prepare for the End of Unit Exam on the last day of the week. They will submit their final papers on the day of the final exam.

Unit Three Recourses:

  • Stephen King's Carrie
  • The Research Essay
  • The Research Essay Rubric
  • The Research Essay Samples
  • The Research Essay Peer Review Sheet
  • End of Unit Exam

 The Final Exam

TBA:  This semester, we will work from a common final exam, which will be fleshed out by mid-semester.