2015-2016

HSC Concert Series Past Programs

The Berkeley Hillside Club Concert Series has been proud to host some of the finest artists performing today. Click on the following links to view some of the past programs in our series:

2017-Current Concerts

2015-2016 Concerts

2013-2014 Concerts

2011-2012 Concerts

2009-2010 Concerts

2007-2008 Concerts

2005-2006 Concerts







                          Jerry Kuderna                                                                                             Silas Patlove

Jerry Kuderna & Silas Patlove
Piano / Clarinet Masterpieces
by Brahms and Debussy

Saturday 17 December 2016 at 8:00pm


In a delightful holiday surprise, the Berkeley Hillside Club Concert Series has just added an wonderful event in December. Our local hero, dear friend, and brilliant pianist Jerry Kuderna has agreed to perform a special chamber music concert for us on Sat 17 December. Performing with him will be the talented clarinetist, Silas Patlove. They will be performing a pair of clarinet/piano masterpieces from Brahms and Debussy. In addition, Jerry will also perform a number of works for solo piano.  Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

Program:

   Recollections, Op. 6 (1968) - Robert Helps
   Études (1915) (selections) - Claude Debussy
   Première rhapsodie (1909-1910) - Claude Debussy
      (for clarinet and piano)

   Intermezzo, A Major Op. 118 No. 2 (1892) - Johannes Brahms
   Das Geistershiff (The Ghost Ship) Op. 1c (1860) - Karl Tausig
   Clarinet Sonata No.1, Op. 120 No. 1 (1894) - Johannes Brahms

About the artists:

Jerry Kuderna received his initial training in piano and conducting in Denver with Antonia Brico. While studying the music of Webern and Schoenberg with Rudolf Kolisch he performed works by the 2nd Viennese school with soprano Bethany Beardslee. He studied piano with Adele Marcus at Juilliard and Robert Helps at the New England Conservatory. He has taught at the University of Louisville and at Princeton University where he met Roger Sessions and Milton Babbitt. His doctoral studies at NYU included a Ph. D dissertation on the piano works of Babbitt. From 2003-2011 he taught music literature at Diablo Valley College.

As a solo recitalist and founding member of the Maybeck Trio, Jerry Kuderna embraces traditional repertoire and new music with boundless virtuosity and fierce commitment. The New York Times'Zachary Woolf wrote of his 2011 concert “Elliott Carter’s seductively daunting “Night Fantasies” (1980), which followed the étude, also owes something to Romanticism: its churning changes of mood, its quiet beginning and jagged fragments of silvery runs. Played by an artist of Mr. Kuderna’s sensitivity, even its most athletic passages were unexpectedly moving, death-defying feats.”

He has been presented by Group for Contemporary Music, The American Society of University Composers, The New Jersey Composer’s Guild, The Los Angeles SCREAM Festival, Earplay and Cal Performances. Kuderna has premiered works by composers such as Milton Babbitt, Claudio Spies, John Selleck, Robert Helps, Ross Bauer, Daniel Brewbaker, Richard Swift, Edwin Dugger, Phillipe Manoury, Herb Bielwa, Ann Callaway and Kurt Erickson, many of whom have written especially for the pianist. Kuderna recorded Babbitt’s Phonemena for Soprano and Piano (with Lynne Webber) for the New World Records historic anthology of American Music series. In January 2006 he gave the West Coast premiere of Elliott Carter's Piano Concerto with the Berkeley Symphony under the baton of George Thompson. He has premiered works by American composers including Milton Babbitt, Richard Swift, Alden Jenks, Robert Helps, Ann Callaway, Judith Shatin and Herb Bielawa .

He recently celebrated twenty years of regular lecture- recitals given under the auspices of The Berkeley Arts festival.

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Silas Patlove is a Massachusetts native who discovered the Bay Area eight years ago, and lives in San Francisco. He studied clarinet at Oberlin Conservatory, and has studied chamber music at the Apple Hill Center for Chamber Music. Locally, he has performed with the Bay Area Rainbow Symphony, the ECHO Chamber Orchestra, and the Classical Revolution chamber music collective. He works as a physician assistant in emergency medicine, and plays music on the side. Lately he has been thinking about trying to reverse that arrangement.







                      Yuri Kye                                Jon Lee                                                       Brady Anderson

               Adam Shulman                                      Erik Markowitz                                                       Evan Hughes


The Alden Trio &
The Adam Shulman Trio

"Maurice Ravel to Bill Evans:
The Piano Trio in the 20th Century"

Sunday 27 November 2016 at 7:00pm


The Berkeley Hillside Club, in collaboration with the Neighborhood Performance Project and Jazz in the Neighborhood, is delighted to present this fascinating program exploring the evolution of the piano trio form in the 20th century, contrasting a classical piano trio (Alden Trio - violin, cello, piano) playing selections from composers Maurice Ravel, Dimitri Shostakovitch, and Pierre Jalbert, with a jazz trio (Adam Shulman Trio - piano, bass, and drums) playing compositions by jazz legend Bill Evans. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall
 

The Alden Trio are:
    Yuri Kye - violin
    Brady Anderson - cello
    Jon Lee - piano

The Adam Shulman Trio are:
    Adam Shulman - piano
    Erik Markowitz - bass
    Evan Hughes -drums

The Program:

The Alden Trio

    Trio for Piano, Violin, and Cello in A minor (1914) - Maurice Ravel (excerpt)
        1. Modéré

    Piano Trio No. 2 in E minor, Op. 67 (1944) - Dimitri Shostakovich (excerpts)
        1. Andante
        2. Allegro Con Brio

    Piano Trio No.1 (1998) - Pierre Jalbert
        1. Life Cycle
        2. Agnus Dei

The Adam Shulman Trio

    Compositions by Bill Evens   (selections subject to change)
        Very Early
        Funkallero
        Orbit
        Turn Out The Stars
        Re: The Person I Knew
        Walkin' Up
        Time Remembered




About the Concert:

The birth of the classical piano trio is widely attributed to Haydn, who wrote over forty works for keyboard, violin, and cello. His scoring was biased, however, showcasing mostly the technique of the pianist, while the violin played a subservient role and the cello doubling the keyboard’s bass. Mozart modified this format by elevating the violin’s role and giving the cello its own dramatic voice. Nonetheless, the piano trio’s evolution was still in its infancy, especially when compared to the string quartet. Haydn’s and Mozart’s quartets were hailed as masterpieces, so when a young Beethoven arrived in Vienna, he decided to avoid an already crowded field and instead focus on the relatively unexplored ensemble, declaring a set of three trios as his first official printed work.

Haydn’s piano trios were structured as three-movement sonatas. Beethoven expanded them to four movements, which by his time was standard practice for string quartets and symphonies. That structure remained intact until the 20th century. The first half of tonight’s program showcases portions of two of the most widely performed 20th century trios, and concludes with one by a living American composer.

We begin with the first movement of Ravel’s Piano Trio. Composed at the dawn of the first World War, this piece represent an apex of his personal style before the war, when he was still unemcumbered by forces he would later face. As with his earlier chamber works including his famous String Quartet (1903) and Sonatine (1905), Ravel employed his signature lush textures, extended chords, and novel harmonic progressions. In the trio’s opening movement Modéré, he manipulates the conventional design of the sonata-allegro movement. The second theme, introduced by the violin in the exposition, does not modulate to either the relative major or dominant, and remains the same when later stated by the cello. Using different chords and following the textures of the development, the intimated recapitulation deceptively restates the first theme, and only later when the theme is transposed exactly does the audience realize its arrival. This technique was favored by Ravel, who was fond of the way Mendelssohn used it in his Violin Concerto, when the orchestra restates the first theme by “interrupting” the violin’s cadenza in the work's opening movement. 

After the war, Ravel was facing a Parisian public that was increasingly eschewing past references and seeking a new simplicity. Stuck with a case of the writer’s block, he struggled to adapt to the new musical trends while still remaining true to himself as a composer. Later, his fascination with jazz would lead to his integration of the art form in his second violin sonata (1927) and Piano Concerto in G (1931).

Next, we explore the first and second movements of Shostakovich’s second piano trio. Composed in the summer of 1944, Shostakovich dedicated the work to the memory of one of his closest friends, Ivan Sollertinsky, who had died the February before. The tribute is not wholly lachrymose, but the bereavement is palpable in the first movement’s elegiac introduction.

The striking opening of the trio begins with a six-measure idea, introduced by solo cello, muted and in harmonics. It is followed in canon by the violin and then the piano in low bass. The material develops and increases in tempo. The lean textures keep the instruments exposed, and the movement concludes in bitterness. That pain lashes out to a brash sarcasm in the second movement, a frenzied, breathless scherzo. Sollertinsky’s sister felt this movement best described her deceased sibling: “that is his temper, his polemics, his manner of speech, his habit of returning to the same thought, developing it.”

We conclude the “classical” (or better described as “written”) half of this evening’s concert with the first piano trio of Pierre Jalbert (b. 1967). Raised in northern Vermont, Jalbert studied piano and composition at Oberlin Conservatory, and was a student of the George Crumb at the University of Pennsylvania, where he received his doctorate in composition. He employs a wide gamut of available harmonies in his compositions, and creates vivid timbres with a pulse, which are on full display in this trio.

Jalbert composed this work for the Foothills Music Festival in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and unlike the previous works on this program, which are each four movements in their entirety, this work contains only two movements of contrasting character. The first, called Life Cycle, was inspired by the arrival of his first son: “I heard my son’s heartbeat for the first time a few months into my wife’s pregnancy and was very surprised at how rapid it was. This rapid pulse became the basis for the first movement. The four sections of the movement each reveal different characters, but are all driven by the rapid beat that opens the movement.” The mystical second movement, Agnus Dei, is modeled on the three-part structure of the Agnus Dei prayer:

Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere nobis.
Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere nobis.
Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, dona nobis pacem.

The violin opens the movement with a mourning melody that is passed to the cello. After a cadence by the ensemble, the section is repeated, much like the second line in the prayer, but at a different pitch level. The material develops, but concludes at yet another place, similar to how the third line compares to the first two. Jalbert dedicated the movement to Mother Teresa who passed away during the creation of this movement.

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Some scholars describe the birth of jazz as the melding in America of traditional African music with European music. It's certainly the case that as the idiom evolved through the 20th century many of its best practitioners were and are classically-trained musicians. The jazz piano trio found one of its most beloved expressions in the late 1950's through the music of pianist Bill Evans.

The second half of this program features the music of pianist Bill Evans.  His music is deeply expressive and rich and shares much of it’s harmonic content with the impressionist composers such as Maurice Ravel and Claude Debussy.  Evans as a composer steps far outside the harmony of the Great American Songbook and often uses chords as blocks of color rather than as functional devices to get from one place to another.  This gives his compositions an exciting vibrant quality that is also something that is shared with the music of the impressionists.  Often your ear is expecting one thing and he will surprise you with something completely different.  Another element of the Bill Evans trio is the very close and often playful and humorous interaction between the piano, bass and drums.  This is also an element that you hear particularly in the music of Debussy.



About the Alden Trio:

The Alden Trio seeks to highlight the musical diversity and quality of the piano trio literature by presenting unique programs exploring an eclectic mix of compositions, from Haydn to Chick Corea. The trio is dedicated to the cause of providing communities with more access to live, quality chamber music performances, and connecting with multi-generational, multicultural audiences. Alden performs frequently in a variety of different settings throughout the Bay Area. Featuring Yuri Kye on Violin, Brady Anderson on Cello, and Jon Lee on Piano, Alden Trio was formed in 2013 and is based in San Francisco, CA.


About the Artists:


Yuri Kye
is a violinist of broad interests who performs extensively throughout the Bay Area. An active freelance orchestral violinist, Yuri has performed with the Monterey Symphony, Santa Rosa Symphony, the Oakland East Bay Symphony, Merced Symphony, and Symphony Napa Valley, as well as the Berkeley Community Chorus & Orchestra, Livermore Valley Opera, and West Edge Opera. A dedicated chamber musician, Yuri is a member of the Elevate Ensemble, a San Francisco-based ensemble of young performers specializing in contemporary works by new composers. Yuri also enjoys performing outside the parameters of classical music, and has appeared in concerts with Deltron 3030, the Ten Tenors, singer-songwriters Chuck Prophet and Jared Gorbel. Yuri is an active session musician and collaborates frequently in the studio with Marcus McCauley, an Oakland-based gospel, R&B and hip-hop composer, arranger, and producer. She has worked on a wide variety of projects which include the video game Team Fortress 2 (2014), and the independent documentary film The Immortalists (2014), and can be heard on the albums of Matt Nathanson (Show Me Your Fangs, to be released October 2015) and Nataly Dawn (How I Knew Her, 2013), among others. Yuri resides in Oakland and maintains a thriving studio of private violin, viola, and piano students.

Cellist Brady Anderson received his Master of Music from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music where he studied with Peter Stumpf. He received his bachelor’s degree from UC Berkeley. As an avid orchestral musician, he has played in the cello sections of several local California orchestras, such as the Stockton Symphony, Monterey Symphony, and Fresno Philharmonic, and Indiana Orchestras Evansville Philharmonic Orchestra, Owensboro Symphony Orchestra, and Columbus Philharmonic. He was principal cellist of UC Berkeley Symphony Orchestra and Berkeley Chamber Orchestra, and IU Philharmonic Orchestra, Symphony Orchestra, Concert Orchestra, and Summer Philharmonic. Brady is also an accomplished soloist, having performed nearly every standard cello concerto with orchestra. He also received top prizes in several competitions, including ASTA and MTNA. Brady’s former teachers include Jonathan Koh and Irene Sharp. He has performed in master classes of Tamas Varga, Zuill Bailey, David Geber, Emilio Colon, Mark Votapek, Irene Sharp, Wendy Sharp, and the Alexander String Quartet. Brady enjoys performing many genres of music and has recorded with dozens of groups, including Nataly Dawn, Cyprus Hill, and Jennifer Hudson. Brady has also performed with hip-hop group Deltron 3030 at Rock the Bells 2012 and 2013, Stern Grove, and the Fillmore in SF. An experienced cello teacher, Brady served as Jonathan Koh’s Teaching Assistant at UC Berkeley and at Mr. Koh’s private studio, while maintaining his own private studio in Pleasanton, CA.

Jon Lee began his piano studies at age 6 and performed his first solo recital at 14. During his formative years in Wisconsin and Utah he studied with Barbara Henry, Elaine Bliss, Donald Walker, and Gary Amano. His active participation in the competition circuit led to wins in the Utah State Fairpark Salute to Youth competition, Utah State University Piano Festival, state division of the MTNA Piano Competition, as well as a finalist in the Kingsville International, Stravinsky International, and Junior Gina Bachauer International Piano Competitions. Jon attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to pursue a computer science degree, during which he studied piano performance under David Deveau. In addition to participating in master classes with Leon Fleisher, André-Michel Schub, and Russell Sherman, Jon has performed with the Utah Symphony and Boston Pops Orchestra.

Adam Shulman
has been a staple of the San Francisco Jazz scene since he moved to the city in 2002. Before the move, Adam was a student at UC Santa Cruz where he studied with the great pianist Smith Dobson and the trumpeter/arranger Ray Brown. He received his degree in classical performance under the tutelage of Maria Ezerova. Adam can also be seen as a sideman with countless bay area musicians and vocalists such as John Wiitala, Vince Lateano, Marcus Shelby, Anton Schwartz, Andrew Speight, Erik Jekabson, Ed Reed, Gary Brown, Patrick Wolff, Faye Carrol, Kellye Gray, Ian Cary, and Mike Zilber among many others. Adam has played as a sideman with internationally renowned artists Stefon Harris, Willie Jones III, Dayna Stevens, Miguel Zenon, Mark Murphy, Alan Harris, Luciana Souza, Paula West, Ratzo Harris, Larry Coryell, Sean Jones, Grant Stewart, John Clayton, Bobby Hutcherson, Bria Skonberg and with the Glen Miller Orchestra.

Drummer Evan Hughes was born and raised in Berkeley, California. Always strongly driven towards music, he began drum lessons at the age of 12, and was able to further develop through programs such as the prestigious Berkeley High School Jazz Ensemble, as well as the Jazzschool in Berkeley. Through these opportunities, Evan found a large Bay Area community of like-minded young musicians, who encouraged him to pursue his musical endeavors. By the end of high school Evan was fortunate enough to begin working as a professional drummer around the Bay Area, and to participate in both the San Francisco Jazz Festival’s High School All-Star Big Band, as well as the Monterey Jazz Festival’s Next Generation Orchestra. After graduating from high school, Evan decided to move to New York to begin studies at New York University. While at NYU, he worked closely with jazz icons such as Joe Lovano, John Scofield, George Garzone, Brian Lynch, Ralph Alessi, as well as studied under drummers Tony Moreno, Billy Drummond, and Dafnis Pietro. He has participated in tours of Europe, Japan, Abu Dhabi and Costa Rica, and played at many prestigious New York City jazz clubs such as The Blue Note, The Jazz Standard, Smalls, and The Jazz Gallery. Since graduating NYU, Evan has worked closely with multi-grammy winning producer and composer Don Sickler, developing the "Jazz Drum Corner" as a valuable asset and educational tool to Mr. Sickler's already extensive music publications.

Bassist Eric Markowitz, born and raised in New Jersey, never thought much of growing up 30 minutes away from the jazz mecca of New York City. That all changed when half way through his college studies in St. Louis, he met world renowned Jazz drummer Joe Charles. Eric spent the next few years apprenticed under local St. Louis legends Joe Charles and Saxophonist/Composer Jimmy Sherrod. Markowitz quickly became one of the leading jazz bassists in St. Louis, voted 4 years in a row best jazz group in St. Louis while playing with the David Stone Trio. Having decided that the St. Louis Jazz community was just too small, he moved to San Francisco in 2004, and was quickly integrated into the local jazz scene. On any given night, you can find him appearing at many of the Bay Area's best jazz venues.







The Erik Jekabson String-tet
plays the Music of Duke Ellington


Saturday 29 Oct  2016 at 8:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is pleased welcome another old friend back to our stage. Trumpeter, composer, and arranger, Erik Jekabson, has delighted our Concert Series audiences with his music, both as a leader and a side-man many times. This time he will be bringing back his String-tet ensemble with a new program of his own arrangements of Duke Ellington's music - this will be some serious jazz!  Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall

The Erik Jekabson String-tet are:

    Erik Jekabson - trumpet
    Mike Zilber - saxophones
    Adam Shulman - piano
    Michele Walther - violin
    Keith Lawrence - viola
    Dillon Vado - vibes
    Doug Stuart - bas
    Evan Hughes - drums


About the Concert:

Trumpeter and arranger Erik Jekabson leads this 8 piece chamber ensemble which explores the music of Duke Ellington from new angles. Ellington, one of the most important American composers of the past hundred years, offers many rich musical veins to mine for new ideas. This ensemble does it with violin, viola, trumpet, saxophone, vibes, piano, bass and drums - and surpassing creativity and virtuosity; expect some new sounds from old classics.


About the Artists:

Erik Jekabson is a freelance trumpet player, composer, arranger and educator who lives in the San Francisco Bay Area.  He is equally busy playing and composing for different bands, leading his own groups and teaching a wide variety of students.  Erik has four CDs out under his own name: his most recent album is “Erik Jekabson Quartet & John Santos: Live at the Hillside Club”, (released in 2014) which like  “Anti-Mass”(2012) , and “Crescent Boulevard” (2010) are on his own Jekab’s Music record label.  A fourth CD,  “Intersection”, was recorded in New York in 2002 and released on the Fresh Sound/New Talent label.  Erik also co-produced and played on two other recordings which are widely available: “Vista: the Arrival” and “New World Funk Ensemble”. He’s recorded as a sideman on numerous other jazz recordings, as well as doing session work in many other genres of music and on movie and video game soundtracks. He’s spent time on the road with Illinois Jacquet, John Mayer, Galactic, and the Howard Fishman Quartet, and has performed at such notable venues as the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, the Algonquin Room, the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, Madison Square Garden, the Tonight Show with Jay Leno and Late Night with David Letterman.  As an arranger and composer, he’s written for both vocalists  such as Madeleine Peyroux, Ani DiFranco, Jackie Ryan, Kenny Washington, Madeline Eastman, Kellye Gray, Sandy Cressman, Raz Kennedy, Shanna Carlson, and instrumental ensembles like the San Francisco Symphony, the Stanford Jazz Orchestra, the Realistic Orchestra, the California State University East Bay Jazz Ensemble, the SF Composers Orchestra and his own Electric Squeezebox Orchestra, which plays every Sunday at Doc’s Lab in San Francisco.

Pianist Adam Shulman has been a staple of the San Francisco Jazz scene since he moved to the city in 2002. Before the move, Adam was a student at UC Santa Cruz where he studied with the great pianist Smith Dobson and the trumpeter/arranger Ray Brown. He received his degree in classical performance under the tutelage of the Russian pianist Maria Ezerova.  In addition to leading his own groups, Adam can also be seen as a sideman with countless bay area musicians and vocalists such as John Wiitala, Vince Lateano, Kitty Margolis, Andrew Speight, Dayna Stephens, Erik Jekabson, Gary Brown, Patrick Wolff, Faye Carrol, Ian Cary, and Mike Zilber among many others. Adam has played as a sideman with internationally renowned artists Stefon Harris, Willie Jones III, Miguel Zenon, Mark Murphy, Alan Harris, Luciana Souza, Paula West, Ratzo Harris, Larry Coryell, Sean Jones, Grant Stewart, Bobby Hutcherson and with the Glen Miller Orchestra.

SF-based Saxophonist and composer Michael Zilber is described by NEA JAZZ MASTER and jazz legend David Liebman as “one of the best players and composers around anywhere. Period!” The Canadian-born ex-New Yorker has 10 CDs to his name as a leader or co-leader. He has also been a sideman on a  number of recordings, and, over the years, has performed/toured and/or recorded with everyone from Liebman to Miroslav Vitous to Bob Berg to Dizzy Gillespie, among many others.   Zilber co-led a band with drumming great Steve Smith for 8 years, releasing the top 20 Blue Jay Jazz recording “Reimagined: Jazz Standards, Volume 1” in 2003. His newest recording is “Live Beauty” (Origin - 2015), which made Downbeat Magazine’s best CDs of the year list for 2015, as well as garnering rave reviews from Jazz Times and All About Jazz. “Live Beauty” was a follow up to the group’s “Shot Through With Beauty” on independent jazz label of the year Origin Records, which NPR jazz critic Andrew Gilbert picked as a top 10 record of the year. These recordings are co-led with guitar great John Stowell. “On Turning Ten: The Billy Collins Project” from 2010, musical settings of the American Poet Laureate’s poems, also on Origin Records, was hailed by Jazz Times’ Bill Milkowski as a work of art of the highest order. Current groups Zilber leads or co-leads include his “Originals for the Originals” Project, with a CD of the same name to be released in January on Origin Records, featuring Dave Kikoski, James Genus and Clarence Penn. As well, his quartet with Stowell, formed in 2007, will be releasing Basement Blues, the group’s 3rd CD on Origin. Lastly, Zilber leads Weather Wayne, his electric jazz homage to Wayne Shorter, and a group that recently played for a sold out house at SFJAZZ.

Vibraphonist Dillon Vado grew up in San Jose, California and began playing music at the age of 7. Learning at first informally from a close family friend, he immediately showed an interest in music. He played music in middle school, and high school focusing on primarily tenor saxophone, and percussion. At Del Mar High School, Dillon spent a lot of time playing in the various music programs offered, from concert percussion in the concert band, to snare drum and tenor drums in the marching band and winter drumline. By the age of sixteen Dillon was gigging and playing regularly. His experiences in high school really helped launch his professional career, because he had many opportunities to play musicals, play in the jazz band, and lead/compose for the drumline. These experiences led him to play snare drum after high school in the first ever Santa Clara Vanguard Winter Drumline, while also studying music at West Valley College in Saratoga, California. It was at West Valley that he started playing vibes more often, and eventually formed his own band, Grooveyard Shift. After West Valley, Dillon transferred to The California Jazz Conservatory in Berkeley, California and is currently there pursuing a Bachelors of Music in Jazz Studies. 

Drummer Evan Hughes was born and raised in Berkeley, California. Always strongly driven towards music, he began drum lessons at the age of 12, and was able to further develop through programs such as the prestigious Berkeley High School Jazz Ensemble, as well as the Jazzschool in Berkeley. Through these opportunities, Evan found a large Bay Area community of like-minded young musicians, who encouraged him to pursue his musical endeavors. By the end of high school Evan was fortunate enough to begin working as a professional drummer around the Bay Area, and to participate in both the San Francisco Jazz Festival’s High School All-Star Big Band, as well as the Monterey Jazz Festival’s Next Generation Orchestra. After graduating from high school, Evan decided to move to New York to begin studies at New York University. While at NYU, he worked closely with jazz icons such as Joe Lovano, John Scofield, George Garzone, Brian Lynch, Ralph Alessi, as well as studied under drummers Tony Moreno, Billy Drummond, and Dafnis Pietro.  He has participated in tours of Europe, Japan, Abu Dhabi and Costa Rica, and played at many prestigious New York City jazz clubs such as The Blue Note, The Jazz Standard, Smalls, and The Jazz Gallery. Since graduating NYU, Evan has worked closely with multi-grammy winning producer and composer Don Sickler, developing the "Jazz Drum Corner" as a valuable asset and educational tool to Mr. Sickler's already extensive music publications.  Evan teaches high school music ensembles at the Calhoun School in New York City.  Evan also continues to tour with longtime musical partners Julian Waterfall Pollack & Ben Flocks, as well as Juno award winning singer Sophie Milman.




         David Wishnia                                David Ryther                                     Sarah Wood                       Omid Assadi

The Circadian String Quartet
"The Sound and the Fury”
Stravinsky's "The Rite of Spring" Re-imagined

Friday 14 Oct 2016 at 8:00pm


The Berkeley Hillside Club is proud to present the Circadian String Quartet  performing David Ryther's remarkable transcription of Stravinsky's "The Rite of Spring" for string quartet and percussion, along with Debussy's famous String Quartet No.1 and variations by the Russian composer Anton Arensky.  Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.


The Circadian String Quartet  are:
     Sarah Wood & David Ryther - violins
     Omid Assadi -  viola
     David Wishnia - cello


About the Concert:

The Circadian String Quartet presents "The Sound and the Fury: The Rite of Spring Re-imagined,” the first concert in a series of three programs developed to explore the revolutionary sound world from Stravinsky's ballet The Rite of Spring and its links to the explosive events of the decades from which it sprung. This iconic 20th century masterpiece, which infamously caused a riot at its 1913 premiere, struck a powerful nerve in a Europe wracked by political and social tension. Since then, the music has provoked unending fascination with its mix of French harmonies & deep, primal Russian roots. This concert features the Circadian's own version of The Rite for String Quartet and Percussion, which will be heard alongside Debussy's ground-breaking 1893 quartet and a collection of variations based on Russian folk themes.


The Program:

String Quartet No. 1 in G minor Op. 10                                         Claude Debussy (1862-1918)

Variations on a Theme by Tchaikovsky                                       Anton Arensky
(1861-1906)
    from String Quartet No. 2 Op. 35a

The Rite of Spring: Scenes of Pagan Rus’ in Two Parts          Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971)
    Part 1: A Kiss of Earth
        I. Introduction
        II. The Augurs of Spring: Dance of the Young Girls
        III. Ritual of Abduction
        V. Spring Rounds
        V. Ritual of the Two Rival Tribes
        VI. Procession of the Oldest and Wisest One
        VII. The Kiss of the Earth/Dancing out of the Earth

    Transcribed for String Quartet and Percussion by David Ryther



The Ensemble:

Bay Area based Circadian String Quartet was founded in 2013 to promote the classical and contemporary string quartet repertoire, in particular music of cultural and folkloric significance. Since then, the group has been featured by Mt. Shasta's Music by the Mountain Chamber Music Festival, SunsetArts Chamber Music Series in San Francisco, and the Merced Symphony Association. CSQ has collaborated with many fine musicians, including the St. Petersburg-based Rimsky Korsakov String Quartet during their 2014 North American tour, and with local musicians of the San Francisco Opera and Ballet. CSQ is proud to have given world- and U.S. premieres of exciting new pieces of chamber music, a result of working closely with several living composers, including Sahba Aminikia, Toronto-based composer and pianist Noam Lemish, and British composer Ian Venables. The Circadian String Quartet has recently been accepted as an ensemble with the San Francisco Friends of Chamber Music.

Members of CSQ serve as resident teaching artists for the Villa Sinfonia Foundation's Zephyr Point Chamber Music Workshop in South Lake Tahoe, NV. Dedicated to music education, the quartet works intensely with musician of all ages in developing their musical abilities in chamber music. The quartet has also developed and presented interactive school programs for grades 4-12.


What people are saying:


"...the ensemble’s(Circadian String Quartet's) approach to interpreting Ryther’s transcription [of The Rite of Spring] was consistently impressive. The performance was clearly the result of passionate commitment, and the contagions of those passions had no trouble spilling off the stage into the audience area."

-Stephen Smoliar.
therehearsalstudio.blogspot.com


The Artists:


David Ryther
(violin) has brought his interpretive powers as a soloist to such festivals as the Darmstadt Summer Festival of New Music, the Banff Center, and the Green Umbrella Series at the Bing theater in Los Angeles. He has been featured playing new music with adventurous ensembles sfSoundGroup, Earplay, San Francisco Contemporary Players, the Berkeley New Music Ensemble, Sonor, and Octagon. An active violinist, he can be found playing in many of the orchestras and ensembles in the Bay Area including the San Francisco Ballet Orchestra. David graduated with highest honors in music from UC Santa Cruz and recently received his doctorate in contemporary violin performance from UC San Diego. A dedicated teacher and conductor, David is a teacher and assistant conductor with Villa Sinfonia in San Francisco, teaches violin at the Crowden School, and has served as coach and interim conductor with the Berkeley Youth Orchestra. As a composer, David has had world premieres played by the Villa Sinfonia, an orchestra piece called "Friend" commissioned by the Croi Glan dance troupe in Cork Ireland, and has worked in residency with Kate Weare company in New York and Dandelion Dance Theater in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Sarah Wood (violin) leads a versatile career as a soloist, chamber and orchestral musician. She has soloed with the Music in the Mountains Summer Festival Orchestra and the Panache, Villa Sinfonia, and Icicle Creek Chamber Orchestras. In addition to her membership with the Circadian String Quartet, Sarah has performed chamber music concerts across the Northwestern and Western United States, and is a frequent recitalist. Sarah is currently acting assistant concertmaster of the California Symphony, acting Principal Second Violin of the Berkeley Symphony, and a member of the Music in the Mountains Summer Festival Orchestra. As an educator, she is on faculty at the Crowden School of Music and teaches privately. She earned her Doctor of Musical Arts in violin performance from the University of Colorado at Boulder where she studied with the Takacs String Quartet and Lina Bahn, and also holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s in violin performance from the Cleveland Institute of Music as a student of Paul Kantor and William Preucil.

Native of Iran, Omid Assadi (viola) holds a B.M. and M.M. from San Francisco Conservatory of Music where he studied with Jodie Levitz and Bettina Mussumeli. Mr. Assadi is an active ensemble player and soloist; he has concertized with many of the Bay Area’s orchestras and has appeared numerous times as soloist with Golden Gate Philharmonic, City College of San Francisco String Orchestra, Kensington Symphony Orchestra, and Villa Sinfonia. Omid’s love for chamber music has led him to study chamber music with the members of the Kronos String Quartet as well as the San Francisco Conservatory of Music faculty members. In addition, he has collaborated with Jennifer Culp, Jodi Levitz, Jorja Fleezanis, and with the Shams Ensemble.

An active chamber musician, David Wishnia (cello) routinely concertizes with both the Circadian String Quartet and the Villa Piano Trio, and has taught at the Zephyr Point Chamber Music Camp and Sequoia Chamber Music Workshop. David has also appeared as a soloist with the Contra Costa Chamber Orchestra and Villa Sinfonia. He is currently a member of the Marin Symphony, and has performed in numerous Bay Area ensembles, including the Berkeley Symphony, Modesto Symphony, Sacramento Symphony, Russian Chamber Orchestra, and Marin Oratorio, among others. David received his Master of Music degree from the Yale School of Music, where he studied with Aldo Parisot. He also studied with Jerome Carrington and Maurice Gendron, and received coaching from Paul Tortelier, Janos Starker, and Pierre Pasquier.



                    Victor Romasevich    Michael Jones                                                   Stephen Levintow     Paul Rhodes



                                                                Larry London                            Lena Lubotsky


The Jupiter Chamber Ensemble with Larry London & Lena Lubotsky

HILLSIDE CLUB BENEFIT CONCERT

Friday 7 Oct 2016 at 8:00pm


The Berkeley Hillside Club is delighted to  welcome our friends, the Jupiter Chamber Ensemble, and Larry London and Lena Lubotsky, back to our Concert Series, in a concert for the benefit of the Hillside Club. They will be performing works by Taneyev, Khatchaturian, and Haydn.  Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.


The Jupiter Chamber Ensemble are:
     Victor Romasevich & Michael Jones
 - violins
     Stephen Levintow - viola
     Paul Rhodes - cello

and Jupiter's Friends are:

     Lawrence London - clarinet
     Lena Lubotsky
 - piano


The Program:

Trio for Two Violins and Viola, Op. 21 (1907)                 SERGEI TANEYEV (1856-1915)
        Michael Jones and Victor Romasevich - violins;  Stephen Levintow - viola

Trio for Clarinet, Violin and Piano (1932)                         ARAM KHATCHATURIAN (1903-1978).
        Lawrence London - clarinet;  Victor Romasevich - violin;  Lena Lubotsky - piano

String Quartet, Op. 54 No. 2 (1788)                                   FRANZ JOSEPH HAYDN (1723-1809)
        Jupiter Chamber Ensemble



The Artists:

In 1997, two veteran freelancers, violinist Michael Jones and Juilliard-trained violist Steve Levintow, recruited BBC Orchestra violinist Andrew Davies and cellist Paul Hale of the Oakland Symphony to found the Jupiter Chamber Players. The group had the good fortune to connect with Marvin Sanders, director of Live Oak Concerts at the Berkeley Art Center, just as the Center's previous ensemble-in-residence, the Cypress Quartet, left to launch their international career. The Art Center remained the Jupiter's "home" venue for 10 years. Paul Rhodes replaced Hale in 2000, bringing his years of experience in numerous orchestras and as soloist with the Carmel Bach Festival. Two years later, Davies left to pursue other projects, and San Francisco Symphony member Victor Romasevich took over as first violinist. Romasevich brought deep fascination with Russian chamber music, including masterworks by such composers as Sergei Taneyev, Georgy Catoire, and Iosif Andriasov (with whom Romasevich studied violin and viola) - all links in a tradition going back to Tchaikovsky through the Moscow Conservatory. The Jupiter Chamber Players take pleasure in introducing wider audiences to the work of these composers,  while continuing also to present more familiar Russian and European repertoire.

Clarinetist and composer Larry London studied composition with Darius Milhaud and Lou Harrison, clarinet with Morton Subotnick.  He has played clarinet in many of the Bay Area's professional orchestras and is currently a member of several chamber ensembles, including the Telluride Chamber Players, the London Quintet, the Troika Trio.  His compositions have been performed at the Aspen, Cabrillo and Telluride Music Festivals,by the Oakland Symphony and the San Francisco Symphony chamber series.  He has written music for film, including Isamu Noguchi: Stones and Paper, an American Masters documentary, and Drawing from Memory: Joann Sfar, a documentary for French Public Television.  Larry London lives in Berkeley and teaches music at Ohlone College.

Lena Lubotsky was born in Moscow, USSR, where she studied piano with professor Konstantin Igumnov and Tamara Bobovich at the Central Musical School, and later graduated from the Department of Musicology of the Tchaikovsky State Conservatory. She has taught piano, music theory, music history and ear training at various music schools in Russia and USA where she has lived since 1977. Ms. Lubotsky has also performed as choral accompanist and chamber music partner with many vocalists and instrumentalists, including her son, Victor Romasevich, member of the San Francisco Symphony. She has appeared at such concert series as Chamber Music Sundaes, UCSF Chancellor Series, Old1st Concerts, Hillside Club, and others. In 2011 and 2012 she participated in the 1st and 2nd Rochester Iosif Andriasov Chamber Music Festiv






New Esterházy Quartet
Padre, Guida, Ed Amico


Friday 16 Sep 2016 at 8:00pm


The Berkeley Hillside Club is delighted to present the New Esterházy Quartet opening their new season. The artists of this celebrated San Francisco Bay Area string ensemble are internationally-known period instrument and chamber music specialists, and have gained a well-deserved reputation for virtuoso playing and interesting programs. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

The Artists:

Lisa Weiss & Kati Kyme - violins
Anthony Martin - viola
William Skeen - 'cello



About the Program:

Mozart wrote a set of six quartets and entrusted them as sons to Haydn, for him to be their Father, Guide, and Friend. This was a very public tribute to a remarkable professional and personal friendship. Each of these two men was perhaps the only one in the world who could fully understand and appreciate the greatness of the other. Despite an age difference of a generation, they eagerly listened to each other’s works and learned from each other, while maintaining their own distinct personalities as men and composers. The New Esterházy Quartet offer four quartets, two from each, early and late in their careers.


The Program:

Mozart: Quartet in A, K169
Haydn: Quartet in F, op77/2
Haydn: Quartet in C, op17/4
Mozart: Quartet in D, K575


The Ensemble:


Founded in 2006 and currently in its eighth year of subscription concerts in San Francisco, Berkeley and Palo Alto, the New Esterházy Quartet continues to present masterworks of the classical period alongside intriguing works from less-familiar composers. With Haydn's 68 quartets as its core repertoire, NEQ is increasingly recognized as one of the world's top period-instrument string quartets. The ensemble has been presented by the San Francisco Early Music Society, Arizona Early Music Society, Carmel Chamber Music Society, has performed in New York and Los Angeles, and appeared as a Main Stage event for the 2012 Berkeley Festival & Exhibition. NEQ was also selected for Early Music America's Touring Artists Roster and has received two grants from the San Francisco Friends of Chamber Music. Recent seasons have featured works by pupils and admirers of Haydn, late quartets of Schubert and Beethoven, and novel explorations of early Bartók and Schoenberg. January 2014 saw the world premiere of Esterházy, book II, written for the ensemble by noted New York composer Paul Brantley. NEQ's 2014 summer project was the complete Mozart "Haydn" Quartets, performed at Berkeley's historic Hillside Club in a three-concert Amadè-Athon. The coming season will include an appearance on Pittsburgh's prestigious "Renaissance and Baroque" series in January and a summer cycle of the late Beethoven quartets. Four Haydn recordings are currently available, and a world premiere recording of a mid-19th century string quartet by Hungarian composer Imre Székely is near release.

The members of NEQ are internationally-known period-instrument and chamber music specialists: Kati Kyme and Lisa Weiss, violins, violist Anthony Martin, and cellist William Skeen. As individuals, the players have performed and recorded in the top echelon of early music ensembles worldwide. In addition to many years of musical collaboration in Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, American Bach Soloists, and a long list of renowned chamber ensembles, these four Bay Area musicians have enjoyed decades of friendship and shared experience. Their history as both colleagues and friends endows the quartet with an unusual commonality of musical language and gesture, and provides a strong foundation for a unique and
original ensemble voice. In addition to concert appearances, NEQ enjoys performing in private homes and other intimate settings where the traditional experience of true chamber music is renewed and shared by players and listeners together.



                 Marlena Shaw                                               Jeff Chambers                                                   John Santos

The 2016 Buddy Montgomery  Jazz Legacy Awards and Concert


Saturday 10 September 2016 at 7:30pm


Sorry...   This Concert is SOLD OUT

The Berkeley Hillside Club is delighted to host the Buddy Montgomery Jazz Legacy Awards, an annual awards event founded to recognize jazz artists for their musical contribution to the genre and for earning their place in the legacy of jazz music.

This inaugural version of the BMJLA will feature performances by celebrated jazz vocalist Marlena Shaw and the Jeff Chambers Power Trio with John Santos, plus a "Special Tribute to Buddy" by Mykah Montgomery. The master of ceremonies will be Clifford Brown, Jr.

These awards are a special effort of the Buddy Montgomery Jazz Legacy Project which was created to regenerate Buddy's objective of promoting jazz as a musical art form, to acknowledge those whose creative expression represent this unique style of music, and to help inspire young music students to continue developing their talent and individual creativity.

Please click on the following link for further information on the Buddy Montgomery Jazz Legacy Project.


The Artists:

Marlena Shaw - vocals
Jeff Chambers Power Trio with John Santos
    Jeff Chambers - bass
    Glen Pearson - piano
    Tim Angulo - drums
with
    John Santos - percussion


About the Artists:

While everyone agrees that Marlena Shaw is a national treasure, it’s difficult to categorize her. Both Downbeat and Record World have named her “Best Female Singer,” and many have compared her range, class and swing that of to eternal jazz lights like Sarah Vaughn, Dinah Washington, and Nancy Wilson. She’s also been called a “soul legend.” The critics use words like “astonishing,” “peerless,” “radiant” and “powerful,” and marvel at her “soaring sensuality.”

Given her 40-year plus boundary-busting career, such labeling confusion is inevitable. It’s easier and more descriptive to think of Marlena as a natural element: like water. Marlena’s music is unmistakable. Whether she’s singing jazz, R&B, pop, rock, soul, blues or gospel, her originality makes such distinctions irrelevant, and each song becomes intimate and new.

Marlena is universally admired for her warm, supple voice and relaxed charm; a natural storyteller, her spoken words before, during, and between songs is often hilarious. Marlena’s smiling; spontaneous interplay with both her band and her audience invites the listener in like a valued friend.

Using the experience she received with the Count Basie Band, Marlena has become a favorite singer for big bands. Witness her work with Frank Foster at Lincoln Center and with Diva. But despite her long experience, there’s no slickness or pretense in Marlena’s style. Communicating directly from her heart and soul to yours, her undiminished creative vitality has no artificial ingredients. Like water – or a welcome breath of fresh air – Marlena is an all-natural element.

----

A talented and versatile bassist, Jeff Chambers is known for his impeccable timing, dynamic rhythms and improvisational dexterity. Chambers musical style is both lyrical and playful. With his distinct touch, smooth sound and innovative sensibility he travels the vast tradition of rhythm-fueled bass playing, skillfully referencing his predecessors while exploring new musical territory.

Chambers masterfully breaks the conventionally accepted boundaries of his instrument and forges new melodic possibilities. According to San Francisco Chronicle music critic Phil Elwood, "Jeff Chambers makes playing upright bass look and sound so easy with his rhythmic sense and melodic vocabulary".

Chambers facility to play both acoustic and electric bass allows him to express himself fluidly in a variety of idioms, including Bebop, Funk, Latin, Blues, Reggae and Fusion. In any genre, Jeff chambers is an improvisational master. "When I am playing music I have one destination, but many routes. It doesn't matter which one I choose; there are many ways to go. The musicians are listening to one another. I can walk with them; then I can venture off, saying am going this way. I'll meet you down the path. Sometimes one is a leader, then another. We switch up. The path is clearer if I close my eyes. I don't have to see the path; I just have to hear the path."

Chambers began his career in Milwaukee on the electric bass with the renowned pianist and vibraphonist Buddy Montgomery. He studied at the Wisconsin Conservatory of Music where he first began to play acoustic bass. His combo, #8, won first place in the College Division Awards in 1976, and the next year at the University at Notre Dame. But for Chambers, the chance to play full time with Buddy Montgomery offered an invaluable education and a quick entrance into the international world of jazz.

In 1978, he left the Conservatory and entered the University of Buddy Montgomery, touring extensively with the master. Since then, Chambers has toured all over the United States, Canada, Central and South America, Europe, Russia, Australia and Japan, performing with many of the world's most prominent jazz musicians.

He is currently working with Marlena Shaw and beginning to headline his own band. Chambers has recorded with Bobby Hutcherson, Charlie Rouse, Buddy Montgomery, Freddie Hubbard, Eddie Harris, Jeffrey Osborne, Al Jarreau, Dizzy Gillespie, Marlena Shaw, Ahmad Jamal, Freddie Cole, and many more. (See Discography for complete list.)

Jeff Chambers has taught bass, improvisation and combo direction at various institutions including The Brubeck Institute, University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA); San Francisco State University (San Francisco, CA); Jazz Camp West (Oakland, CA); The Jazz School (Berkeley, CA); Berkeley High School (Berkeley, CA); Fresno State University (Fresno, CA); and Dominican University of California (San Rafael, CA) and though out the greater Bay Area public school system. Chambers also teaches privately.

----

Seven-time Grammy-nominated percussionist, US Artists Fontanals Fellow, and 2013-2014 SFJAZZ Resident Artistic Director, John Santos, is one of the foremost exponents of Afro-Latin music in the world today. Born in San Francisco, California, November 1, 1955, he was raised in the Puerto Rican and Cape Verdean traditions of his family, surrounded by music. The fertile musical environment of the San Francisco Bay Area shaped his career in a unique way.

His studies of Afro-Latin music have included several trips to New York, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Brazil and Colombia. He is known for his innovative use of traditional forms and instruments in combination with contemporary music, and has earned much respect and recognition as a prolific performer, composer, teacher, writer, radio programmer, and record/event producer whose career has spanned four decades. John has performed and/or recorded with acknowledged, multi-generational masters such as Cachao, Dizzy Gillespie, Tito Puente, Bebo Valdés, Max Roach, Eddie Palmieri, Patato Valdés, Lázaro Ros, Bobby Hutcherson, Manny Oquendo, Chucho Valdes, Paquito D’Rivera, Buenavista Social Club, Chocolate Armenteros, John Handy, Billy Cobham, Zakir Hussain, Hermeto Pascoal, George Cables, Generoso Jimenez, Joe Henderson, and many others

John’s work has also been recognized and supported by the Monterey Jazz Festival (2002), the Smithsonian Institution, the California Arts Council, United States Artists, the Zellerbach Family Fund, the Fund for Folk Culture, the Ford Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlitt Foundation, the East Bay Community Foundation, the National Association of Latino Arts and Culture, the Creative Work Fund, and the City of Oakland. The City of San Francisco issued a mayoral proclamation declaring November 12, 2006 John Santos Day. He was featured prominently in the PBS American Masters documentary, Cachao: Uno Mas (2008), and is the subject of another PBS documentary by Searchlight Films (Oakland, CA), currently in progress.

John is an advisory board member of the Afro Latin Jazz Alliance (NY) and the Oaktown Jazz Workshop (Oakland, CA), and a Trustee of SFJAZZ.




   Harvey Wainapel    Jane Lenoir       Ricardo Peixoto        Brian Rice                                               Howard Alden

Berkeley Choro Ensemble
In Concert
with special guest
Howard Alden


Saturday 6 August at 8:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is delighted to welcome The Berkeley Choro Ensemble, a quartet of brilliant local artists, in a concert of Brazilian music. Joining the ensemble will be famed 7-string jazz guitarist, Howard Alden. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.



The Artists:

Berkeley Choro Ensemble
    Harvey Wainapel -
sax & clarinet
    Jane Lenoir - flute
    Ricardo Peixoto - guitar
    Brian Rice - percussion

special guest artist
    Howard Alden
- 7-string guitar


About the Concert:

Berkeley Choro Ensemble joins forces with famed jazz guitarist Howard Alden to present a diverse program of compositions showcasing a history of Brazilian Popular Music. The group will perform works by some of the great composers in Brazil , including Pixinguinha, Baden Powell, Ernesto Nazareth, and others. Alden will also perform solo readings of jazz standards.


About the Berkeley Choro Ensemble:

The Berkeley Choro Ensemble (pronounced "shoro"), is a group of world-class musicians from the SF Bay Area that made its debut in January, 2010, at the Berkeley Public Library. The group celebrates the music, culture and history of Brazil, with a special emphasis on the Choro genre, a style of music which emerged in the 1800's in Brazil, fusing the music of Brazil's European immigrants and the native music of Brazil's indigenous and African-Brazilian population. In particular, the choro sound is somewhat akin to a combination of European classical music, ragtime, and blues. Historically, the choro style influenced Brazil's most famous classical composer, Heitor Villa Lobos, to compose some of the world's most hauntingly beautiful music, the Bachianas Brasileiras. Our repertoire also includes samba, bossa nova, jazz, and the music of Northeast Brazil.


About Howard Alden:
        Howard Alden's website
        Berkeleyside article by Andy Gilbert



Artist Bios:

From a family of professional musicians, flutist Jane Lenoir grew up in Tampa, Florida, and left home at 15 as a SCHOLARSHIP student to the Interlochen Arts Academy in Michigan and then to Oberlin Conservatory of Music. A performer comfortable in many diverse styles, Jane appears regularly as a soloist, chamber player, orchestral musician, and jazz performer. She first began her study of Brazilian music in 2006, and has since performed with Marcos Silva, Jovino Santos Neto, Hermeto Pascoal, and recorded with Carlos Oliveira and Ceilia Medeiros, Live at Anna's Jazz Island and Brazilian Choro 2009. In 2010 she visited Brazil and studied with Hermeto Pascoal, Jovino Santos Neto, Paulo Sergio Santos, Allessandro Pennezzi and Ted Falcon. She is principal flutist with the Music in the Mountains Festival Orchestra in Grass Valley, and also performs with Sexteto Matiz, an Afro-Cuban ensemble, and numerous jazz, and new music and chamber ensembles in styles ranging from early music (baroque flute) to free improvisation.


Saxophonist/clarinetist Harvey Wainapel (pronounced "wine-apple") has performed with the likes of McCoy Tyner, Joe Lovano, Ray Charles, Dave Brubeck, and Joe Henderson. Besides working with these and numerous other leaders, Wainapel has toured extensively under his own name, and has performed in 22 countries. His heavy involvement with the music of Brazil has led to performances with top-level musicians such as Airto Moreira, Flora Purim, Dori Caymmi, Guinga, and Jovino Santos Neto. Wainapel was a featured soloist on two CDs that were final nominees for Latin Grammy Awards™ "Best Latin Jazz Recording" (with Jovino Santos Neto in 2004 and with Mark Levine in 2003). Harvey has been called "one of the most promising and versatile players of his generation" (All Music Guide to Jazz 1998)

Originally from Rio de Janeiro and based in the Bay Area, guitarist/composer Ricardo Peixoto is among the top representatives of Brazilian guitar in the US, with a fluid melodic style and a keen compositional sense. His performances explore Brazil's rich and diverse traditions, both in his original work as well as in arrangements of Brazilian classics. His approach is grounded both in the jazz and Brazilian music traditions, but always ventures well beyond their borders, combining rich melodies, sophisticated harmonies, and the unmistakable rhythms of Brazil. Ricardo came to the US on a scholarship to the Berkeley School of Music in Boston, and later continued his studies in classical guitar at the SF Conservatory of Music. He has recorded, performed, and collaborated with, among others, Claudia Villela, Flora Purim and Airto, saxophonist Bud Shank, percussionist Dom Um Romão, Toots Thielemans, Dori Caymmi, Guinga, guitarist Carlos Oliveira, Harvey Wainapel, Marcos Silva and Terra Sul. He has performed throughout the US, Europe, Canada, Japan and Brazil.

Percussionist Brian Rice graduated from the Interlochen Arts Academy and Oberlin College Conservatory of Music with a B.M. in Percussion Performance and Ethnomusicology. A well-rounded musician, Brian is a highly acclaimed performer, educator and recording artist adept at numerous musical styles ranging from classical and jazz, to Latin, Afro-Cuban, and Brazilian, to contemporary and experimental music. Brian's study of the Brazilian pandeiro began in 1986 when the Sao Paulo State University percussion ensemble visited Oberlin and percussionist/composer Carlos Stasi, then a student at SPSU, gave Brian a quick pandeiro lesson after the concert. Since then Brian's obsession with the pandeiro has led him to study with Guello, Marcos Suzano, Airto, Claudio Bueno and Clarice Magalhaes, and his prowess on the instrument has led him to perform with numerous Brazilian artists including, Jovino Santos Neto, Paulo Sergio Santos, Danilo Brito, Dudu Maia and Jorge Alabe. It was studies with Marcos Suzano that inspired Brian to expand his use of the pandeiro outside the Brazilian music world and apply it to Balkan, Celtic, Middle Eastern, Spanish, and Cuban music with great effect.

Howard Alden was born in Newport Beach, California in 1958. He began playing the 4-string tenor guitar and banjo at age ten. After hearing recordings of Barney Kessel, Charlie Christian, Django Reinhardt and other jazz guitar greats, he got a six-string guitar and started teaching himself to play that as well. As a teenager he played both instruments at various venues in the Los Angeles area. He studied guitar with Jimmy Wyble when he was 16. In 1977–78 he studied jazz guitar at the Guitar Institute of Technology in Hollywood with Howard Roberts, where he eventually assisted Roberts in organizing and preparing his curriculum materials. Alden then conducted some of his own classes at GIT. Alden made his first trip to the east coast in the summer of 1979, playing in a trio led by the legendary vibraphonist Red Norvo for three months at Resorts International in Atlantic City. Alden moved to New York City in 1982 to play an extended engagement at the Café Carlyle with jazz pianist/songwriter Joe Bushkin. Soon afterward, he was discovered by Joe Williams and Woody Herman. In 1983 he was already collaborating with Dick Hyman, when he appeared with him and a host of other musicians at Eubie Blake's one-hundredth birthday concert. In 1988, Alden signed with the Concord Jazz record label and recorded many albums with them over the following fifteen years as a leader and sideman. Alden recorded the guitar performances for Sean Penn's character Emmet Ray in Woody Allen's 1999 film Sweet and Lowdown, and taught Penn how to mime the performances for the film. The score also featured Bucky Pizzarelli on rhythm guitar and arrangements by pianist Dick Hyman.



           Victor Romasevich             Scott Macomber                                Timothy Owner                              Christopher Gaudi

The 7th California
Andriasov Music Festival
also featuring music of
Honegger & Bozza

Saturday 30 July 2016 at 8:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is delighted and honored to present the 7th California Andriasov Festival dedicated to the music of the celebrated Armenian-Russian composer Iosif Andriasov and his son Arshak in arrangements for violin, piano and winds. Also featured will be works by Honegger and Bozza. This concert was conceived and organized by San Francisco Symphony violinist, Victor Romasevich, for whom Iosif Andriasov was a teacher and mentor. All the artists in this concert are current or former members of the San Francisco Symphony. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.


The Artists:

Victor Romasevich
- violin & piano
Scott Macomber - trumpet
Timothy Owner - trombone
Christopher Gaudi - oboe


The Program:

Arthur Honegger       Intrada for Trumpet and Piano

Iosif Andriasov          Musical Sketch for Oboe and Piano, Op. 5

Arshak Andriasov      Piece for Trumpet and Piano, Op. 9B

Iosif Andriasov          Musical Sketch for Trombone and Piano, Op. 4d

Arshak Andriasov       Five Romances, Op. 2, for various voices and piano,
                                                performed on trumpet and trombone

Eugene Bozza           Ballade for Tenor Trombone and Piano, Op. 62

Iosif Andriasov           Four Romances (Op. 9, Op. 10, Op. 11, Op. 13),
                                                performed on trumpet and trombone

Iosif Andriasov           Musical Sketch for Oboe and Piano, Op. 24

Iosif Andriasov           Passacaglia for Trombone and Piano, Op. 22C

Arshak Andriasov       Duet for Violin and Oboe, Op. 12

Iosif Andriasov           Meditation for Trombone and Piano, Op. 30d

Iosif Andriasov           Concertino for Trumpet and Piano, Op. 14



About Iosif & Arshak Andriasov:

Iosif Andriasov (Ovsep Anreasian) was a composer, moral philosopher, and teacher who created a new style of performing arts based on expressing “spiritual virtues." A genuine altruist and a heroic personality, Mr. Andriasov was internationally recognized during and after his life as one of the most important figures in contemporary world culture. Mr. Andriasov was born in Moscow on April 7, 1933, to an Armenian family. After graduation from the Moscow Conservatory, I. Andriasov entered the Soviet Composers' Union upon recommendation of Dmitry Shostakovich, who said of him, "When the entire world lost a sense of harmony, composer Iosif Andriasov has not only not lost  this sense, but added to harmony a new quality." After he wrote a book of aphorisms "To My Friends" and won the Soviet Composers' Competition for his Second Symphony, the Ministry of Culture offered Mr. Andriasov a post as a Head of the Special Committee on Music and Moral Matters under the USSR General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev. I. Andriasov declined the position. Then, he was asked by another senior official if he would accept the Soviet government’s most prestigious honor, the Lenin Prize. Mr. Andriasov rejected that as well, stating: "By accepting a reward from criminals, one becomes an accomplice to the criminals.” Mr. Andriasov proposed significant democratic reforms that the Soviet Government refused to implement. "I will not let you make "creative slaves" using my ideas", he said.

In 1979, at the invitation of Senators Jacob Javits, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, and Edward Kennedy, Iosif Andriasov emigrated to the U.S.. He lived with his family in New York City, USA, until his death on November 16, 2000. He continued to compose and to work on his philosophic ideas, and he continued to take an uncompromising stance against all manifestations of what he called "slave-master morality" - world domination, Nazism, chauvinism, cult of personality, and so on. In his life, music, and philosophy he asserted “morality of the free creative individuals” ( I. Andriasov).

Continuing in his father's footsteps, commissioned composer/pianist Arshak Andriasov (b. 1980 in New York City) has performed in numerous venues, including Carnegie Hall. His music draws on a vast array of musical resources, ranging from Armenian folk music to Russian classical music, with certain elements of American jazz, while using means of contemporary language to create a complex system of juxtaposition.

  --Marta Andriasova, 2016

For information about composer and philosopher Iosif Andriasov and composer Arshak Andriasov, please visit www.andriasovstore.com  © Marta Andriasova (Kudryashova)



About the Artists:

Violinist and violist Victor Romasevich was born in Minsk, Belarus. His mother, Lena Lubotsky, began teaching him piano when he was four. At five, he started violin studies with Anna Silberstein. At six, he enrolled in the violin class of Mikhail Garlitsky and Lev Sharinov at The Gnesin Music School in Moscow. As a youth he studied violin with Rostislav Dubinsky of the Borodin Quartet. He continued his training at the Moscow Conservatory with Boris Belenky and Nadia Beshkina. Following his emigration to the United States in 1977, he studied at The Juilliard School with Ivan Galamian. In 1979 he became a violin and viola pupil of the composer and philosopher Iosif Andriasov. Winner of the Gina Bachauer Prize at the 1985 J.S. Bach International Competition, Mr. Romasevich joined the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra as Associate Principal Violist in 1990, and in 1992 moved to the First Violin section. He joined the Trio Navarro in 2013. He appears frequently in recitals and chamber concerts as a violinist, violist, and keyboard player.

San Francisco Bay Area trumpeter, Scott Macomber, is in demand as an orchestral trumpeter, chamber musician, soloist, and educator. Scott frequently appears onstage and in the pit with the San Francisco Symphony, Opera and Ballet orchestras. During the 2009-10 season he served as acting third trumpet with the SF Symphony. He has joined the SF Symphony for several domestic and international tours and appeared on recent recordings of Mahler Symphony #8, Ives' Concord Symphony, Adams' Harmonielehre and Varese's Ameriques all under the baton of Michael Tilson Thomas. Scott serves in permanent positions with the California Symphony, Santa Rosa Symphony and Sacramento Philharmonic. Scott is also Co-Principal Trumpet of the prestigious Arizona MusicFest All-Star Orchestra and Principal Trumpet of the Mendocino and Music in the Mountains (Grass Valley) Festival Orchestras. Born in Evanston, IL, Scott began studying the trumpet at age nine. After receiving his Bachelor of Music Degree at Northwestern University in 1995 Scott moved to the Bay Area to earn his Master's degree at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music in 1997.

Originally from Australia, Timothy Owner moved to the United States in the fall of 2004 to pursue a Masters Degree in Trombone Performance at Northwestern University. Since that time, he has built an exciting career performing on Alto, Tenor and Bass Trombones as well as Bass Trumpet and Euphonium in some of the United States' finest orchestral and chamber ensembles. He has been a member of the Virginia Symphony Orchestra as well as the Civic Orchestra of Chicago, and been with the San Francisco Symphony as Utility and Associate Principal Trombone since the 2013/2014 season.

Currently the Acting Associate Principal oboe of the San Francisco Symphony, Christopher Gaudi has also served as the Acting Assistant Principal oboe of the National Symphony Orchestras, as Professor of Oboe at the University of Indiana Bloomington Jacob School of Music, Principal Oboe in the San Diego Symphony, Guest Principal oboe with the Atlanta, Seattle, and Puerto Rico Symphony Orchestras, and has been a frequent substitute with the Metropolitan Opera. He has also performed with the Cleveland Orchestra, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, and for multiple occasions at the at the White House. Currently he also serves as President of the Board for OvreArts, Inc., a non-profit arts organization in Pittsburgh, PA. A student of Elaine Douvas and John Mack, Mr. Gaudi received both his Bachelor and Master of Music degrees from The Juilliard School. He has participated in numerous festivals including Aspen, Kent/Blossom, Mainly Mozart, Spoleto (Italy), the New York String Orchestra Seminar, and the Interlochen Arts Camp, and has presented masterclasses at The Colburn School, Interlochen, Asian Youth Orchestra (Hong Kong) and Hidden Valley Music Seminars. He also maintains a blog, www.oboeclass.com, a website full of information and resources for oboists.



     Marylin Thompson                Jill Rachuy Brindel                     Victor Romasevich             Philip Santos              Marcel Gemperli

Trio Navarro & Friends
Two Russian Piano Quintet Masterpieces

Sunday 24 July 2016 at 7:00pm


The Berkeley Hillside Club is delighted to welcome Trio Navarro & Friends to our Concert Series. They will be performing a pair of wonderful Russian piano quintets by Arensky and Taneyev. And as a special treat, violinist Victor Romasevich will be joined by pianist Lena Lubotsky in another rare Russian violin/piano masterpiece by Golubev. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

The Artists:

Marilyn Thompson
- piano
Victor Romasevich - violin
Philip Santos - violin
Marcel Gemperli - viola
Jill Rachuy Brindel - cello
Lena Lubotsky - piano

About Trio Navarro:

Co-founded in 1992 by pianist Marilyn Thompson and cellist Jill Rachuy Brindel, Trio Navarro celebrates its 24th season as chamber music artists in residence at Sonoma State. Comprised of violinist Victor Romasevich, cellist Jill Rachuy Brindel and pianist Marilyn Thompson, Trio Navarro has performed virtually the entire “standard” piano trio repertoire.

They are advocates of out-of-print and rarely performed works by composers including Rebecca Clarke, Paul Juon, Fanny Mendelssohn-Hensel, Clara Schumann and Sergei Taneyev. In the contemporary vein, they have performed trios by Chick Corea, Richard Danielpour, Brian S. Wilson, Kirke Mechem and Paul Schoenfeld.

Their frequent collaborations with Bay Area musicians and instrumentalists from the San Francisco Symphony, Opera, and Ballet orchestras have brought a remarkable range of mixed ensemble repertoire that includes the String Quartets of Bernard Brindel and Iosif Andriasov; Piano Quintets of Schumann and Shostakovich; the Vaughan Williams Quintet in D; Piano Quartets of Catoire, Fauré, Mozart, Saint Saëns and Schumann, and the Horn Trios of Brahms and Brian S. Wilson.

The Program:

    Piano Quintet in D Major, Op.51
(1900) - Anton Arensky  (1861-1906)
        1. Allegro moderato,
        2. VARIATIONS
        3. SCHERZO. Allegro vivace
        4. FINALE. Allegro moderato

    Sonata for Violin and Piano in D Major, Op.37
(1952) - Evgeny  Golubev (1910-1988)
        1. Allegro moderato
        2. Andante
        3. Allegro patetico     

     Piano Quintet in g minor, Op.30
(1911) - Sergei Taneyev (1856-1915)
        1. INTRODUZIONE (Adagio mesto) - Allegro patetico
        2. SCHERZO. Presto
        3. Largo
        4. FINALE. Allegro vivace

About the Artists:


Pianist Marilyn Thompson is Professor of Piano and Director of Chamber Music at Sonoma State. She received her Bachelor’s Degree from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, where she was a student of Adolph Baller. She was awarded a Fulbright grant to the Vienna Academy of Music, and subsequently received her Master’s Degree from Stanford University, where she studied under the Helen Evans Memorial Scholarship on a full-tuition grant. While at Stanford, she gave the West Coast Premier of Roger Sessions’ Piano Concerto. She has given countless recitals in the United States and abroad, and has been the featured soloist in concerti of Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Brahms, Rachmaninoff, Gershwin, Martinu, Hindemith, Barber and others.

She has performed virtually the entire standard chamber music repertoire. Her recordings include performances of the Thomas Beversdorf Cello Sonata, the Brahms Trio, Op. 87, and Ravel’s Violin-Piano Sonate. Miss Thompson has performed in chamber music concerts in Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center; the 92nd Street “Y” in New York City; the Philip’s Gallery, Washington D.C.; Boston’s Symphony Hall; Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco; and in the Teatro Nacional, San Jose, Costa Rica. In the 1980s she was the pianist member of the Chamber Soloists of San Francisco and the San Francisco Trio. At the present time Miss Thompson is the pianist of the NAVARRO TRIO – which she co-founded in 1992 with cellist Jill Rachuy Brindel – a group that performs frequently throughout the Bay Area. Marilyn Thompson has taught at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music; the College of Holy Names, Oakland, California; at the University of California at Santa Cruz; and is presently on the faculty of Sonoma State University where she has taught since 1976.


Violinist and violist Victor Romasevich was born in Minsk, Belarus. His mother, Lena Lubotsky, began teaching him piano when he was four. At five, he started violin studies with Anna Silberstein. At six, he enrolled in the violin class of Mikhail Garlitsky and Lev Sharinov at The Gnesin Music School in Moscow. As a youth he studied violin with Rostislav Dubinsky of the Borodin Quartet. He continued his training at the Moscow Conservatory with Boris Belenky and Nadia Beshkina. Following his emigration to the United States in 1977, he studied at The Juilliard School with Ivan Galamian. In 1979 he became a violin and viola pupil of the composer and philosopher Iosif Andriasov. Winner of the Gina Bachauer Prize at the 1985 J.S. Bach International Competition, Mr. Romasevich joined the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra as Associate Principal Violist in 1990, and in 1992 moved to the First Violin section. He joined the Trio Navarro in 2013. He appears frequently in recitals and chamber concerts as a violinist, violist, and keyboard player.


Jill Rachuy Brindel is Adjunct Instructor in Cello at SSU. She has been a cellist with the San Francisco Symphony since 1980 and a co-founder and member of NAVARRO TRIO, an ensemble hailed as “the premier trio of Northern California” by Classical Sonoma.  Ms. Brindel studied at Indiana University and Chicago Musical College and was formerly Assistant Principal Cellist of the Lyric Opera of Chicago Orchestra, Principal Cellist of the Mendocino Music Festival for its first six years, cellist for the Navarro Quartet and a member of the Houston Symphony. She has performed chamber music at Kohl Mansion, the Russian River Chamber Festival, Old First Church, the Ralston Chamber Series and Chamber Music Sundaes. In 2006 she returned to the Mendocino Music Festival as Principal Cellist and chamber soloist and in 2009 she became co-director of the Emerging Artists Program at the festival. Ms. Brindel actively promotes the music of her late father, composer Bernard Brindel. She is  a private instructor of cello as well as the coach for the cello section of the SFS Youth Orchestra. In 2015 she joined the faculty of Sonoma State University as studio cello instructor. Ms. Brindel has given seminars on audition techniques to students at the University of Nevada at Reno and the New World Symphony.


Philip Santos discovered the violin in the Oakland public schools. He has performed extensively in many capacities throughout the Bay Area and across the country, and is a frequent performer on numerous chamber series, including the San Francisco Symphony's chamber music series, Chamber Music Sundaes, Old First Church Concerts, Composers Inc, Music on the Hill, as well as Carnegie Recital Hall in new York with the California Chamber Players. He has been a member of the Berkeley Symphony, Oakland Symphony, and the San Francisco Symphony. He has also played with the Chicago Symphony. As a member of the Skywalker Symphony, he has recorded soundtracks for numerous major motion pictures and video games. Currently, Mr. Santos is concertmaster of Philharmonia Healdsburg, assistant concertmaster of Marin Symphony, and principal second violin of California Symphony. Mr. Santos served as concertmaster of the Fremont Symphony from 2002 to 2012. In addition to his performance schedule, Mr. Santos teaches violin and viola and conducts the string ensemble at California State University East Bay. He also teaches at Patten Academy and University, as well as many private students.

Marcel Gemperli began studying the viola at the age of eight in his native New York State and continued his musical education while earning his B.A. at Harvard University. He spent two years continuing his viola studies in Germany and Switzerland before settling in the Bay Area. Marcel currently serves as Principal Viola of the California Symphony, and performs frequently with many orchestras including the San Francisco Symphony, the San Francisco Ballet and Opera Orchestras, the San Francisco and New Century Chamber Orchestras, as well as the orchestras of Marin, Modesto, Santa Rosa and Silicon Valley.  Marcel performs frequently in touring Broadway productions and also records numerous film and television soundtracks at the Skywalker Sound Studio.  He has performed at the Telluride Chamber Music Festival, the Mendocino Music Festival, and as part of the Midsummer Mozart Festival Orchestra.

Lena Lubotsky was born in Moscow, USSR, where she studied piano with professor Konstantin Igumnov and Tamara Bobovich at the Central Musical School, and later graduated from the department of musicology of the Tchaikovsky State Conservatory. She has taught piano, music theory, music history and ear training at various music schools in Russia and USA where she has lived since 1977. Ms. Lubotsky has also performed as choral accompanist and chamber music partner with many vocalists and instrumentalists, including her son, Victor Romasevich.




Sergey Musaelyan
Piano Recital

Friday 15 July 2016 at 8:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is honored to present the brilliant Russian pianist, Sergey Musaelyan, performing classics from three centuries, including sonatas from Haydn and Prokofiev, as well as pieces by Chopin.  Don't miss this remarkable artist performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

The Artist:

Sergey Musaelyan - piano

--

The Program:

    Josef Haydn (1732-1809)
            Keyboard Sonata No.47 in B minor, Hob.XVI:32 (1776?)

    Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953)
            Piano Sonata No.7 in B♭ Major, Op.83 (1939-1942)

    Frederick Chopin (1810-1849)
            Ballade No.1 in G minor, Op.23 (1835-1836)
            4 Preludes, Op.28
            Scherzo No.2 in B♭ minor, Op.31 (1837)

About the Artist:

The internationally acclaimed Russian pianist, Sergey Musaelyan, was born in 1950, to a respected piano teacher in the Moscow Central Music School for gifted and talented children, which he attended. After graduation he entered the Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory and studied there under the celebrated pianist, Jakob Flier, whose tradition of performing and teaching he has since pursued. He is an Honored Artist of Russia and the winner of numerous International piano competitions. He has performed solo recitals and concertos with orchestras in some of the most prestigious concert halls in the world, and under the baton of such conductors as Vladimir Ashkenazi, Valery Georgiev and many others. Musaelyan was named the Person of the Year by the US Biography Reference Center in 1995, and was featured in the 2012 documentary film. "Pianism," by Ivan Tverdovsky.


Performances:

Sergei Musaelyan plays Rachmaninoff Concerto No.3

Sergei Musaelyan plays Sergei Prokofiev Sonata No.7





Kenneth Renshaw & Audrey Vardanega
Play Brahms & Beethoven


Sunday 12 June 2016 at 7:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is thrilled to present two superb young artists performing Brahms and Beethoven. Our audiences will recall the brilliant playing of pianist Audrey Vardanega earlier this year in her concert memorializing the late maestro George Cleve. She will be joined for this performance by her long-time collaborator, the celebrated violinist Kenneth Renshaw. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

The Artists:

Audrey Vardanega - piano

Kenneth Renshaw - violin


About the Program:

In his Violin Sonata No.1 in G Major, Brahms showcases the combined power of the violin and the piano through the demanding virtuosity  and the intense lyricism in both instrumental parts. The sonata form coupled with the interaction and unification between violin and piano contain Brahms' relentless search for respite within his multifaceted, deeply varied emotional life.

Beethoven's Piano Sonata No. 31 in Ab major, composed in 1821 at the same time he was working on his Missa Solemnis and Ninth Symphony, is an exquisite piece of music. It starts in a quiet, contemplative mood and moves, with remarkably creative and subtle harmonic complexity, through to a joyous conclusion.

Kenneth Renshaw and Audrey Vardanega began playing together when they were middle-schoolers at The Crowden School in Berkeley. Since then, Renshaw and Vardanega have performed to critical acclaim in venues all over the world such as the Louvre Museum in Paris, Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall, the Menuhin Festival Gstaad, and the Hangzhou Grand Theater. They have each studied and collaborated in performance with some of the world’s foremost musicians including violinists Itzhak Perlman and Pamela Frank, pianists Seymour Lipkin and Richard Goode, and violist Kim Kashkashian.



The Program
(please note program change):

Violin Sonata No.1 in G Major, Op. 78 -
Johannes Brahms
    Kenneth Renshaw - violin
    Audrey Vardanega - piano

Piano Sonata No. 31 in A-flat major, Op. 110 - Ludwig van Beethoven
    Audrey Vardanega- piano


About the Artists:


With playing hailed as "gorgeous, finely detailed...positively ravishing, a marvel of emotional maturity" (San Francisco Classical Voice) and praised for its "natural and honest sense of communication" (Strad Magazine), American violinist Kenneth Renshaw has appeared as soloist with orchestras throughout the world, including the National Orchestra of Belgium, the Orchestre de Chambre de Wallonie, the Lithuanian National Orchestra, the China Philharmonic, the China NCPA Orchestra, the Jenaer Philharmonie, the Staatskapelle Weimar, the California Symphony, the American Philharmonic, and the Orquestra de Festival Ushuaia. He has given sold-out recitals at the Auditorium du Louvre (Paris) , the Mecklenburg-Vorpommern-Festspiele (Germany), the Menuhin Festival Gstaad (Switzerland) and has repeatedly been featured on the national radio stations of Germany, Belgium, Argentina, Lithuania, and the United States.Kenneth won First Prize and the EMCY Prize for Best Semifinal Recital at the 2012 Yehudi Menuhin International Violin Competition. He also won First Prize, the Mozart Concerto Prize, and the Sonata Prize at the 2010 Spohr International Violin Competitions, and First Prize at the 2009 Los Angeles Philharmonic competition, and was a Laureate of the 2015 Queen Elisabeth International Violin Competition of Belgium.

A passionate chamber musician, he has collaborated in performances with many esteemed artists, including legendary pianist Leon Fleisher, violinists Shmuel Ashkenasi, Pamela Frank, Cho-Liang Lin, cellists Matt Heimovitz, Peter Wiley and Ralph Kirschbaum, violists Kim Kashkashian and Atar Arad, and flutist Sir James Galway. He was a member of the Soleil Piano Trio from 2008-2010, First Prize winners of the Mondavi Center for the Arts Chamber Music Competition. Kenneth was an Evnin Rising Star at the Caramoor Festival (Katonah, NY) and has participated in the Ravinia Festival's Steans Institute, the Perlman Music Program’s Residencies in Sarasota (Florida) and Stowe (Vermont), Music@Menlo’s International Chamber Music Institute, and the 2013 Kronberg Academy Violin Masterclasses.

Kenneth was Concertmaster of the internationally-acclaimed San Francisco Symphony Youth Orchestra from 2008-2010; he made his solo debut at Davies Symphony Hall as winner of the orchestra's concerto competition in 2010. He has studied with Donald Weilertstein at the New England Conservatory, Itzhak Perlman at the Perlman Music Program, and Li Lin at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. He is currently studying at the Juilliard School with Mr. Perlman and Mr. Lin as a recipient of a Kovner Fellowship. He has been generously loaned violins from the Juilliard School, Bein&Fushi/The Stradivarius Society of Chicago, Reuning&Sons of Boston, Christophe Landon Rare Violins, and the Maestro Foundation of Southern California.


---


Praised as a “[musically] eloquent” (San Francisco Classical Voice) player “with the kind of freedom, authority, and strength…that one expects from the world’s finest pianists” and a “forcefully established…major talent” (The Berkeley Daily Planet), twenty-year-old pianist and composer Audrey Vardanega was born and raised in Oakland, California and began her piano studies at the age of six wih Araks Aghazarian. She began formal piano training with acclaimed pianist Robert Schwartz at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music from 2002 to 2013. Since then, she has also worked with notable pianists such as Gary Graffman, Alain Planés, Yefim Bronfman, Wojciech Switala, and Richard Goode. Her past primary instructors include former assistant conductor of the New York Philharmonic Seymour Lipkin, former Head of Music at the BBC World Service Jeremy Siepmann, and Professor Christopher Elton of London's Royal Academy of Music. She currently studies with Victor Rosenbaum and Maria Asteriadou in New York City. Vardanega made her debut as a soloist with the San Francisco Chamber Orchestra at the age of 11 and became the youngest soloist in the history of the Bay Area's Midsummer Mozart Festival under the baton of the acclaimed Maestro George Cleve in the summer of 2010, appearing again with Maestro Cleve in the summers of 2012 and 2013. In the summer of 2008, Vardanega made her solo recital debut at the age of 12 with IMG Artists’ Festival Del Sole in Napa Valley, California. Since then, she has been featured as a solo recitalist and performer at venues like the Hangzhou Grand Theater, the Hangzhou Conservatory of Music, Herbst Theater, San Francisco’s Old First Concerts Series, the Palace of Legion of Honor, the San Francisco Conservatory, and the Berkeley Hillside Club Concert Series, among others. Vardanega is a rising senior at Columbia University majoring in Political Science with a focus in International Relations and concentrating in Gender Studies. She is currently writing her Senior Thesis on the politics of Classical performance and is a programmer for WKCR FM NY 89.9. For more information on upcoming concerts, visit www.audreyvardanegapianist.com.





New Esterházy Quartet
From Bohemia's Fields & Groves
Music by Dvořák and Smetana


Friday 27 May 2016 at 8:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is delighted to present the New Esterházy Quartet in the last program of their 2015-2016 season. The artists of this celebrated San Francisco Bay Area string ensemble are internationally-known period instrument and chamber music specialists, and have gained a well-deserved reputation for virtuoso playing and interesting programs. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

The Artists:

Kati Kyme and Lisa Weiss - violins
Anthony Martin - viola
William Skeen
- 'cello


About the program:

Bedřich Smetana and Antonin Dvořák were the first Czech composers to achieve world recognition. Both drew inspiration from the folk music and rhythms of their native land. Smetana is considered the father of modern Czech music, particularly its opera, and Dvořák followed in his footsteps with a prodigious creative output. This evening's concert will feature quartets from each, including Smetana's rarely performed Quartet number 2 in D minor.


The Program:

Quartet No. 11 in C, Op. 61 (1881)                Antonin Dvořák (1841–1904)
    1.  Allegro
    2. Poco adagio e molto cantabile
    3. Scherzo: Allegro vivo
    4. Finale: Vivace

Quartet No. 2 in D minor (1882)                    Bedřich Smetana (1824–1884)
    1.  Allegro
    2., Allegro moderato
    3. Allegro non più moderato, ma agitato e con fuoco
    4.  Finale: Presto

Two Waltzes, Op. 54, No. 1 & 4 (1880)         Antonin Dvořák  
      Moderato
      Allegro vivace


The Ensemble:

Founded in 2006 and currently in its eighth year of subscription concerts in San Francisco, Berkeley and Palo Alto, the New Esterházy Quartet continues to present masterworks of the classical period alongside intriguing works from less-familiar composers. With Haydn's 68 quartets as its core repertoire, NEQ is increasingly recognized as one of the world's top period-instrument string quartets. The ensemble has been presented by the San Francisco Early Music Society, Arizona Early Music Society, Carmel Chamber Music Society, has performed in New York and Los Angeles, and appeared as a Main Stage event for the 2012 Berkeley Festival & Exhibition. NEQ was also selected for Early Music America's Touring Artists Roster and has received two grants from the San Francisco Friends of Chamber Music. Recent seasons have featured works by pupils and admirers of Haydn, late quartets of Schubert and Beethoven, and novel explorations of early Bartók and Schoenberg. January 2014 saw the world premiere of Esterházy, book II, written for the ensemble by noted New York composer Paul Brantley. NEQ's 2014 summer project was the complete Mozart "Haydn" Quartets, performed at Berkeley's historic Hillside Club in a three-concert Amadè-Athon. The coming season will include an appearance on Pittsburgh's prestigious "Renaissance and Baroque" series in January and a summer cycle of the late Beethoven quartets. Four Haydn recordings are currently available, and a world premiere recording of a mid-19th century string quartet by Hungarian composer Imre Székely is near release.

The members of NEQ are internationally-known period-instrument and chamber music specialists: Kati Kyme and Lisa Weiss, violins, violist Anthony Martin, and cellist William Skeen. As individuals, the players have performed and recorded in the top echelon of early music ensembles worldwide. In addition to many years of musical collaboration in Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, American Bach Soloists, and a long list of renowned chamber ensembles, these four Bay Area musicians have enjoyed decades of friendship and shared experience. Their history as both colleagues and friends endows the quartet with an unusual commonality of musical language and gesture, and provides a strong foundation for a unique and original ensemble voice. In addition to concert appearances, NEQ enjoys performing in private homes and other intimate settings where the traditional experience of true chamber music is renewed and shared by players and listeners together.







              Jeremy Constant                                      Polina Sedukh                                    Adam Smyla                                                  Amos Yang
Sun Valley Players
Beethoven & Kodály


Sunday 22 May 2016 at 7:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is delighted to host the return of the Sun Valley Players, an ensemble of virtuoso musicians, to our Concert Series. They will be performing one of Beethoven's Late Quartets, along with Kodály's violin/cello duo. And there's a secret ... this super-group are performing in maschera - in real life they are all mild-mannered members of the San Francisco Symphony! Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

The Sun Valley Players are:
Jeremy Constant - violin
Polina Sedukh - violin
Adam Smyla - viola
Amos Yang - cello

The Concert:


Hungarian composer Zoltán Kodály wrote his Duo for Violin and Cello in 1914 at the outbreak of the first World War. It's a rich, passionate piece infused with Hungarian sonorities and a balanced interplay between the two instruments.

In the last several years of his life, Ludwig van Beethoven created a series of six string quartets of surpassing beauty, subtlety, and sophistication. These pieces have become known as the "Late Quartets." At the time of their composition, however, Beethoven's contemporaries didn't know what to make of them; one commented that "we know there is something there, but we do not know what it is." Composer and conductor Louis Spohr called them "indecipherable, uncorrected horrors." Since that time, however, these works have become revered by generations musicians, scholars, and listeners alike. For this concert the Sun Valley Players will be performing one of these Late Quartets, String Quartet No. 13.


The Program:

Duo for Violin and Cello in D minor, Op. 7 - Zoltán Kodály

1. Allegro serioso, non troppo
2. Adagio
3. Maestoso e largemente, ma non troppo lento


String Quartet No. 13 in Bb Major, Op. 130, - Ludwig van Beethoven

1. Adagio, ma non troppo - Allegro
2. Presto
3. Andante con moto, ma non troppo. Poco scherzoso
4. Alla danza tedesca. Allegro assai
5. Cavatina. Adagio molto espressivo
6. Finale: Allegre


The Artists:
After winning the Grand Prize in the 1979 Du Maurier competition in Canada, violinist Jeremy Constant studied in New York with Ivan Galamian and then with the great violinist Itzhak Perlman before making the San Francisco Bay Area his home. He became a member of the San Francisco Symphony in 1984, with whom he continues to perform as Assistant Concertmaster. He has been Concertmaster of the Marin Symphony since 1994 and in 2000 was named Concertmaster of the Sun Valley Summer Symphony. He is a frequent soloist with the orchestra and participant in the Edgar M. Bronfman Chamber Series. As an active soloist and chamber musician both here and abroad, Jeremy has performed on radio and television around the world. He was violinist in the San Francisco Piano Trio, and a founding member of the Navarro Trio and Navarro Quartet. He can be heard as Assistant Concertmaster on Grammy Award winning releases such as the continuing Mahler cycle by the San Francisco Symphony and can been seen on their ongoing television project Keeping Score. Jeremy plays the ex-Heberlein Stradivarius from the year 1700, which was donated to the San Francisco Symphony for his exclusive use. Residing in Oakland with his wife Sharon, Jeremy is a pilot who took over 7 years to build a plane which he currently enjoys flying.

Born to a family of musicians in St. Petersburg, Russia, Polina Sedukh began studying violin at the age of four, her first teachers being her father Grigory Sedukh and Savely Shalman. She is a graduate of Special Music School of the St. Petersburg Conservatory, and the Rimsky-Korsakov State Conservatory, where she studied under the guidance of Lev Ivaschenko and Vladimir Ovtcharek. She also holds Artist Diploma from Longy School of Music in Cambridge, MA, where she studied with Laura Bossert and Malcolm Lowe. Prizewinner of the International Spohr Competition in Weimar, Germany, Ms. Sedukh made her solo orchestral debut at the age of seven with the Chamber Orchestra of Liepaya, Latvia and has since appeared as soloist with St. Petersburg State Symphony Orchestra, Boston Virtuosi Orchestra, St.Petersburg Capella Symphony Orchestra, Newton Symphony Orchestra and Weimer State Capella Orchestra. Following her passion for symphonic music, Ms. Sedukh pursued career in major American orchestras, presently being a member of 2nd violin section of San Francisco Symphony since 2009, and having previously served as a member of Boston Symphony Orchestra from 2004 to 2007.

At age 17, violist Adam Smyla won the first prize at the National Viola Competition in his native Poland. Within six months, he became the youngest member of the Polish National Radio and Television Orchestra and was invited to join the Penderecki String Quartet with whom he toured throughout the world for nearly a decade. Adam was Assistant Principal Violist of the Chicago Lyric Opera and Principal Violist of the Concertanti di Chicago before becoming a member of the San Francisco Symphony in 2000. Adam appears frequently in chamber music concerts throughout the Bay Area, often in collaboration with his wife, pianist Edna Koren.

Amos Yang is the Assistant Principal cellist for the San Francisco Symphony. He has performed as a soloist and chamber musician throughout the U.S., the Far East and Europe. He has also collaborated in chamber music with the Ying Quartet, the Turtle Island String Quartet, pianists Ann Schein and Melvin Chen, violinist Earl Carlyss and composer Bright Sheng. Yang’s awards include the Performer’s Certificate at Eastman School of Music and first prizes in the American String Teacher’s Association and Grace Vamos competitions. He was finalist in the Pierre Fournier International Cello Competition and was awarded the CD Jackson Prize at the Tanglewood Music Festival for outstanding musical contribution. As cellist of the Maia String Quartet from 1996-2002, Yang was involved in many educational programs, performing throughout the country for schools under the auspices of such organizations as Arts Excel, Young Audiences Inc. and the Midori Foundation. During this time he also served on the faculties of the Peabody Conservatory, the University of Iowa, Grinnell College and the Interlochen Advanced String Quartet Institute. Yang holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the Juilliard School of Music. Before joining the San Francisco Symphony, Yang was a member of the Seattle Symphony, maintaining a private teaching studio as well as cultivating an active solo and chamber music life. Born and raised in San Francisco, he was a member of the San Francisco Symphony Youth Orchestra and San Francisco Boys Choir.




                    Victor Romasevich    Michael Jones                                                   Stephen Levintow     Paul Rhodes


                                  Lena Lubotsky                                Larry London                              Steven Dibner

The Jupiter Chamber Ensemble & Friends

Saturday 7 May 2016 at 8:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is pleased to bring one of our favorite string ensembles, the Jupiter Chamber Ensemble, back to our Concert Series. For this performance they will be accompanied by a group of virtuoso players in a program including Mozart's famous Clarinet Quintet in A Major (one of the most admired of the composer's works) as well as works from Tchaikovsky, Glazunov, London, and Iosif and Arshak Andriasov. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.


The Jupiter Chamber Ensemble are:
     Victor Romasevich & Michael Jones
 - violins
     Stephen Levintow - viola
     Paul Rhodes - cello

and Jupiter's Friends are:
     Lena Lubotsky
 - piano
     Lawrence London - clarinet
     Steven Dibner
 - bassoon


The Program:

    Scherzo from String Quartet No. 2, Op. 22                           - Pytor Tchaikovsky

    Musical Sketch for Violin and Piano, Op. 4C                        - Iosif Andriasov *
    Musical Sketch for Bassoon and Piano, Op. 24A
    Andante for Violin and Piano

    "Dynamo Quintet" for Clarinet and String Quartet             - Lawrence London

    String Quartet, Op.1                                                                   - Iosif Andriasov *

    "16 Themes in 16 Measures" for Solo Clarinet, Op. 16    - Arshak Andriasov *
    (Themes 2, 8, 9, 11)

    "Reverie Orientale" for Clarinet and String Quartet          - Alexandre Glazunov

    Quintet for Clarinet and String Quartet, K. 581                   - W.A. Mozart

*For information about composer and philosopher Iosif Andriasov and composer Arshak Andriasov,
please visit www.andriasovstore.com  © Marta Andriasova (Kudryashova)



The Artists:

In 1997, two veteran freelancers, violinist Michael Jones and Juilliard-trained violist Steve Levintow, recruited BBC Orchestra violinist Andrew Davies and cellist Paul Hale of the Oakland Symphony to found the Jupiter Chamber Players. The group had the good fortune to connect with Marvin Sanders, director of Live Oak Concerts at the Berkeley Art Center, just as the Center's previous ensemble-in-residence, the Cypress Quartet, left to launch their international career. The Art Center remained the Jupiter's "home" venue for 10 years. Paul Rhodes replaced Hale in 2000, bringing his years of experience in numerous orchestras and as soloist with the Carmel Bach Festival. Two years later, Davies left to pursue other projects, and San Francisco Symphony member Victor Romasevich took over as first violinist. Romasevich brought deep fascination with Russian chamber music, including masterworks by such composers as Sergei Taneyev, Georgy Catoire, and Iosif Andriasov (with whom Romasevich studied violin and viola) - all links in a tradition going back to Tchaikovsky through the Moscow Conservatory. The Jupiter Chamber Players take pleasure in introducing wider audiences to the work of these composers,  while continuing also to present more familiar Russian and European repertoire.

Lena Lubotsky was born in Moscow, USSR, where she studied piano with professor Konstantin Igumnov and Tamara Bobovich at the Central Musical School, and later graduated from the Department of Musicology of the Tchaikovsky State Conservatory. She has taught piano, music theory, music history and ear training at various music schools in Russia and USA where she has lived since 1977. Ms. Lubotsky has also performed as choral accompanist and chamber music partner with many vocalists and instrumentalists, including her son, Victor Romasevich, member of the San Francisco Symphony. She has appeared at such concert series as Chamber Music Sundaes, UCSF Chancellor Series, Old1st Concerts, Hillside Club, and others. In 2011 and 2012 she participated in the 1st and 2nd Rochester Iosif Andriasov Chamber Music Festival.

Clarinetist and composer Larry London studied composition with Darius Milhaud and Lou Harrison, clarinet with Morton Subotnick.  He has played clarinet in many of the Bay Area's professional orchestras and is currently a member of several chamber ensembles, including the Telluride Chamber Players, the London Quintet, the Troika Trio.  His compositions have been performed at the Aspen, Cabrillo and Telluride Music Festivals,by the Oakland Symphony and the San Francisco Symphony chamber series.  He has written music for film, including Isamu Noguchi: Stones and Paper, an American Masters documentary, and Drawing from Memory: Joann Sfar, a documentary for French Public Television.  Larry London lives in Berkeley and teaches music at Ohlone College. 


Born in Michigan in 1954 into a family of illustrious scientists, Steven Dibner began his life as an actor and singer. After getting his Masters Degree from "The" Juilliard School, he enjoyed an active freelance career playing with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and at the Met.Joining the San Francisco Symphony as Assistant and later Associate Principal in 1983 and 1987, he played as soloist under Menuhin and Blomstedt, and conducted concerts with his own group PARLANTE - a chamber orchestra featuring SFS talent which garnered outstanding reviews, while still identifying as bicoastal. As a member of the NY-based conductorless orchestra Orpheus, he played concertos and concerts around the globe and made many recordings. For over 20 years he balanced summer commitments to music festivals in San Diego, Aspen and Marlboro, Vermont. A reluctant teacher, he has often offered a class at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music called "Bel Canto for Wind Instruments" and coached the New World Symphony. Preferring to stay hyper-involved, he adopted a baby boy from Guatemala as a proudly single dad. His volunteer activities enrich his love of first graders, dahlias, and dogs.





New Esterházy Quartet
Viola Quintets from Haydn's Circle

Friday 1 April 2016 at 8:00pm
The Berkeley Hillside Club is pleased to welcome back our Ensemble in Residence, the New Esterházy Quartet, performing a series of viola quintets from Haydn and his contemporaries. The artists of this celebrated San Francisco Bay Area string ensemble are internationally-known period-instrument and chamber music specialists and have gained a well-deserved reputation for virtuoso playing and interesting programs. Joining the NEQ for this concert will be a special guest artist, Robert Mealy, on viola. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

The Artists:

Kati Kyme
& Lisa Weiss - violins
Anthony Martin - viola
William Skeen - 'cello

special quest artist:
Robert Mealy - viola

The Program:

Divertimento in G (c. 1760)                          Joseph Haydn (1732-1809)
    I. Allegro moderato

Notturno in C (1773)                                      Michael Haydn (1737-1806)
    II. Adagio cantabile
    III. Menutto: Allegretto

Quintet in F minor (1786)                             Ignaz Pleyel (1757-1831)
    IV. Finale: Allegro

Quintetto dramatique:                                 Sigismund Neukomm (1778-1858)
Une fête de Village en Suisse (1812)   

    IV. Allegretto scherzando-Valse-Le Ran des Vaches-l'Angelus-Allegretto

                    intermission

Quintetto in Eb, K. 614 (1791)                    Wolfgang Mozart (1756-1791)
    Allegro di molto
    Andante
    Menuetto: Allegretto
    Allegro


The Ensemble:

Founded in 2006 and currently in its eighth year of subscription concerts in San Francisco, Berkeley and Palo Alto, the New Esterházy Quartet continues to present masterworks of the classical period alongside intriguing works from less-familiar composers. With Haydn's 68 quartets as its core repertoire, NEQ is increasingly recognized as one of the world's top period-instrument string quartets. The ensemble has been presented by the San Francisco Early Music Society, Arizona Early Music Society, Carmel Chamber Music Society, has performed in New York and Los Angeles, and appeared as a Main Stage event for the 2012 Berkeley Festival & Exhibition. NEQ was also selected for Early Music America's Touring Artists Roster and has received two grants from the San Francisco Friends of Chamber Music. Recent seasons have featured works by pupils and admirers of Haydn, late quartets of Schubert and Beethoven, and novel explorations of early Bartók and Schoenberg. January 2014 saw the world premiere of Esterházy, book II, written for the ensemble by noted New York composer Paul Brantley. NEQ's 2014 summer project was the complete Mozart "Haydn" Quartets, performed at Berkeley's historic Hillside Club in a three-concert Amadè-Athon. The coming season will include an appearance on Pittsburgh's prestigious "Renaissance and Baroque" series in January and a summer cycle of the late Beethoven quartets. Four Haydn recordings are currently available, and a world premiere recording of a mid-19th century string quartet by Hungarian composer Imre Székely is near release.

The members of NEQ are internationally-known period-instrument and chamber music specialists: Kati Kyme and Lisa Weiss, violins, violist Anthony Martin, and cellist William Skeen. As individuals, the players have performed and recorded in the top echelon of early music ensembles worldwide. In addition to many years of musical collaboration in Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, American Bach Soloists, and a long list of renowned chamber ensembles, these four Bay Area musicians have enjoyed decades of friendship and shared experience. Their history as both colleagues and friends endows the quartet with an unusual commonality of musical language and gesture, and provides a strong foundation for a unique and original ensemble voice. In addition to concert appearances, NEQ enjoys performing in private homes and other intimate settings where the traditional experience of true chamber music is renewed and shared by players and listeners together.

Recipient of Early Music America’s Binkley Award for outstanding teaching and scholarship, violist Robert Mealy has taught at Harvard, Yale, and now at the Juilliard School, where he directs the Historical Performance Program. A native of the Bay Area, he has performed and recorded as violinist and violist with many distinguished orchestras and chamber groups throughout the world. The New Esterházy Quartet are thrilled to have this opportunity to collaborate with him.




  Olga Ortenberg-Rakitchenkov                Arcadi Serper                     Sergey Rakitchenkov                       Dawn Walker

The Melodiya Chamber Ensemble
"Romance and Passion from France and Germany"

Friday 26 February 2016 at 8:00p

The Berkeley Hillside Club is delighted to welcome the Melodiya Chamber Ensemble to our Concert Series stage. This unique trio of virtuoso players, along with a special guest artist, will be performing wonderful selections from the French and German classical repertoires spanning two centuries. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.


The Melodiya Chamber Ensemble are:
    Olga Ortenberg-Rakitchenkov
- harp
    Arcadi Serper
- piano
    Sergey Rakitchenkov
- viola

with special guest artist:
    Dawn Walker
- flute


The Program:


   Sonate for Flute ,Viola and Harp - Claude Debussy
   Romance,op.37 - Camille Saint-Saens
   En Bateau - Claude Debussy
   Petite suite for Flute, Viola and Harp - Andre Jolivet
   Romance,op.50 in F - Ludwig van Beethoven
   Sonate for Viola and Piano,op.120 No.1 - Johannes Brahms


The Ensemble


The Melodiya Chamber Ensemble have performed in the Bay Area for 25 years. Its regular members are Olga Rakitchenkov, Principal Harp in the San Francisco Opera, virtuoso pianist Aracadi Serper, and Sergey Rakitchenkov, Associate Principal Viola in the San Francisco Opera. Joining Melodiya for this performance will be Dawn Walker, Principal Flute of the Monterey Symphony and a member of the Carmel Bach Festival orchestra.


The Artists:

The San Francisco Opera Orchestra’s Principal Harp Olga Ortenberg-Rakitchenkov was born in Russia into a family rich in musical tradition. Her mother was an editor of Musica, a major Russian publishing company, and her granduncle was a member of the Budapest Quartet. The former Associate Concertmaster of the San Francisco Opera, Adolf Bruk, is her uncle. Olga started piano lessons at seven at Moscow’s Gnesin School for Musically Gifted Children. At eleven, she began to study harp in the class of Mark Rubin, making it her primary instrument. She graduated with Highest Honors from Moscow’s Tchaikovsky Conservatory, studying with Professor Vera Dulova. Olga won the position of Associate Principal Harp in the Bolshoi Theatre Orchestra in 1973 and was promoted to Principal. In 1989, after immigration to the United States, she won the position of Principal Harp for the San Francisco Opera Orchestra.

Arkadi Serper is a prominent pianist and composer. He had an outstanding career as Musical Director of the Musical Theater Department at the Gnesin Conservatory prior to his move to the Bay Area in 1992. Mr. Serper has performed in Europe, the United States, and Asia. His compositions have been performed by the Stockton Symphony, Vallejo Symphony, Kairos Youth Choir, The Crowden School, and the San Francisco Boys’ Chorus. He has been a member of the Crowden faculty since 1992, coaching chamber music and teaching music theory and composition. Mr. Serper teaches piano at CCMC.

Associate Principal Viola in the San Francisco Opera, Sergey Rakitchenkov was born in Moscow and attended the Central School for Musically Gifted Children. He graduated with honors from the Tchaikovsky Conservatory of Music in Moscow, where he studied with Fyodor Druzhinin. For fifteen years he performed with the Bolshoi Theatre Orchestra, rising to become Principal of the viola section. In 1980 he won the prestigious All-Union Musical Competition. His playing was broadcast on a major Soviet Union radio station. In 1987, soon after arriving in the United States with his wife Olga and daughter Liza, he won a position in the viola section of the San Francisco Opera Orchestra, where he currently serves in the Associate Principal chair. He also performs at special events around the San Francisco Bay Area and in Europe.

Dawn Walker is Principal Flute of the Monterey Symphony and a member of the Carmel Bach Festival Orchestra.  She has performed with the San Francisco Opera and Ballet orchestras for more than 20 years.  Ms. Walker toured the United States for two years as principal flute with the SF Opera’s touring ensemble, the Western Opera Orchestra.  She has been a featured soloist with the New Century Chamber Orchestra, the Monterey Symphony and the Carmel Bach Festival Orchestra.  She received her Master of Music degree from New England Conservatory with distinction in performance.  She studied with Frances Blaisdell, Claude Monteux, John Heiss and attended masterclasses with Julius Baker and Keith Underwood.   In December 2015 she released a CD with harpist Olga Rakitchenkov called "Lyric Flute and Harp Musical Offerings" available on iTunes and Amazon.




                    Victor Romasevich    Michael Jones                                                   Stephen Levintow     Paul Rhodes

The Jupiter Chamber Ensemble
play Haydn, Villa-Lobos & Schubert

Sunday 17 January 2016 at 7:00p

The Berkeley Hillside Club is pleased to welcome one of our favorite string ensembles, the Jupiter Chamber Ensemble, back to our Concert Series They will be performing quartets by Haydn, Villa-Lobos and Shubert Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

The Jupiter Chamber Ensemble are:
            Victor Romasevich & Michael Jones - violins
            Stephen Levintow - viola
            Paul Rhodes - cello


The Program:

Quartet Op.76  No.6 in E flat Major - Joseph Haydn

Quartet No.1 - Heitor Villa-Lobos

Quartet Op.29 in A minor - Franz Schubert


The Artists:

In 1997, two veteran freelancers, violinist Michael Jones and Juilliard-trained violist Steve Levintow, recruited BBC Orchestra violinist Andrew Davies and cellist Paul Hale of the Oakland Symphony to found the Jupiter Chamber Players. The group had the good fortune to connect with Marvin Sanders, director of Live Oak Concerts at the Berkeley Art Center, just as the Center's previous ensemble-in-residence, the Cypress Quartet, left to launch their international career. The Art Center remained the Jupiter's "home" venue for 10 years. Paul Rhodes replaced Hale in 2000, bringing his years of experience in numerous orchestras and as soloist with the Carmel Bach Festival. Two years later, Davies left to pursue other projects, and San Francisco Symphony member Victor Romasevich took over as first violinist. Romasevich brought deep fascination with Russian chamber music, including masterworks by such composers as Sergei Taneyev, Georgy Catoire, and Iosif Andriasov (with whom Romasevich studied violin and viola) - all links in a tradition going back to Tchaikovsky through the Moscow Conservatory. The Jupiter Chamber Players take pleasure in introducing wider audiences to the work of these composers,  while continuing also to present more familiar Russian and European repertoir






New Esterházy Quartet
Haydn & His Students VIII

Friday 15 January 2016 at 8:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is delighted to have our Ensemble in Residence, the New Esterházy Quartet, welcome the New Year with the latest edition of their Hayden & His Students series. The artists of this celebrated San Francisco Bay Area string ensemble are internationally-known period-instrument and chamber music specialists and have gained a well-deserved reputation for virtuoso playing and interesting programs. This  concert will include quartets by Haydn, Beethoven, and Spech. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.



The Artists:

Kati Kyme
& Lisa Weiss - violins
Anthony Martin - viola
William Skeen - 'cello


The Program:

Quartet in G minor, Op. 2, No. 1 - János Spech

Quartet in Bb, Op. 71, No. 1 - Haydn

Quartet in F, Op. 59, No. 1 - Beethoven


The Ensemble:

Founded in 2006 and currently in its eighth year of subscription concerts in San Francisco, Berkeley and Palo Alto, the New Esterházy Quartet continues to present masterworks of the classical period alongside intriguing works from less-familiar composers. With Haydn's 68 quartets as its core repertoire, NEQ is increasingly recognized as one of the world's top period-instrument string quartets. The ensemble has been presented by the San Francisco Early Music Society, Arizona Early Music Society, Carmel Chamber Music Society, has performed in New York and Los Angeles, and appeared as a Main Stage event for the 2012 Berkeley Festival & Exhibition. NEQ was also selected for Early Music America's Touring Artists Roster and has received two grants from the San Francisco Friends of Chamber Music. Recent seasons have featured works by pupils and admirers of Haydn, late quartets of Schubert and Beethoven, and novel explorations of early Bartók and Schoenberg. January 2014 saw the world premiere of Esterházy, book II, written for the ensemble by noted New York composer Paul Brantley. NEQ's 2014 summer project was the complete Mozart "Haydn" Quartets, performed at Berkeley's historic Hillside Club in a three-concert Amadè-Athon. The coming season will include an appearance on Pittsburgh's prestigious "Renaissance and Baroque" series in January and a summer cycle of the late Beethoven quartets. Four Haydn recordings are currently available, and a world premiere recording of a mid-19th century string quartet by Hungarian composer Imre Székely is near release.

The members of NEQ are internationally-known period-instrument and chamber music specialists: Kati Kyme and Lisa Weiss, violins, violist Anthony Martin, and cellist William Skeen. As individuals, the players have performed and recorded in the top echelon of early music ensembles worldwide. In addition to many years of musical collaboration in Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, American Bach Soloists, and a long list of renowned chamber ensembles, these four Bay Area musicians have enjoyed decades of friendship and shared experience. Their history as both colleagues and friends endows the quartet with an unusual commonality of musical language and gesture, and provides a strong foundation for a unique and original ensemble voice. In addition to concert appearances, NEQ enjoys performing in private homes and other intimate settings where the traditional experience of true chamber music is renewed and shared by players and listeners together.





Audrey Vardanega
Piano
"A Concert for George"

Sunday 3 January 2016 at 7:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is excited to present a phenomenal young pianist in a special program of dedicated to the memory of the late George Cleve. Oakland born and raised, Audrey Vardanega made her Midsummer Mozart Festival debut in 2010 at age 14. Since then, Vardanega has earned high praise from audiences and critics, who describe her as playing "with an astonishing beauty and maturity beyond her years."


About the Program:


This past August, George Cleve, famed conductor, founder and director of the Midsummer Mozart Festival for more than 40 years, and leader of the San Jose Symphony for two decades, passed away. Audrey Vardanega was Maestro Cleve's protégée, and she is dedicating this concert to his memory.

Writer Martin Snapp describes it like this:

"A few days before his death, his protégée and surrogate granddaughter, Audrey Vardanega, the brilliant 19-year-old pianist who made her debut with the festival at age 14 (the youngest soloist in the festival's 41-year history), went to his home and played some of his favorite piano pieces for him. It was the last live music he ever heard.

Since then, she's been struggling to find a way to express her sorrow, and she's finally found it. On January 3 she'll perform a memorial concert at the Hillside Club in Berkeley, playing the same pieces she played for him last summer. It's called Concert For George, of course."

You may find the complete story of this wonderful tribute on Martin Snapp's website:

http://www.martinsnapp.blogspot.co.uk/2015/12/a-musical-tribute_13.html


The Program:

This performance is dedicated to the late Maestro George Cleve.

Piano Sonata No. 4 in E-flat Major, K. 282
- Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

Années de pélerinage, Deuxiéme année: Italie, S. 161 - Franz Liszt (1811-1886)

Gaspard de la nuit: Trois poémes pour piano
- Maurice Ravel (1875-1937)

Klavierstucke, Op. 118
- Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)


About the Artist:


Praised as a player “with the kind of freedom, authority, and strength…that one expects from the world’s finest pianists,” Audrey Vardanega, a twenty-year-old pianist and composer born and raised in Oakland, California, began her piano studies at the Alameda Starland Music Center at the age of six. Vardanega began formal piano training with acclaimed pianist Robert Schwartz at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music from 2002 to 2013 as well as formal composition training with Arkadi Serper at the Berkeley Crowden School from 2004 to 2013. She has also received piano instruction from Gary Graffman, Paul Hersh, Lang Lang, Jon Nakamatsu, Paul Roberts, Meng-Chieh Liu, Yefim Bronfman, Richard Goode, Victor Rosenbaum, and Seymour Lipkin. Vardanega made her debut as the youngest soloist in the history of the Midsummer Mozart Festival under the baton of the late Maestro George Cleve in the summer of 2010, appearing two more times with the orchestra in recent years. Among others, Vardanega has also appeared as a soloist with San Francisco’s Symphony Parnassus and the San Francisco Chamber Orchestra. Vardanega made her solo recital debut at IMG Artists’ Festival Del Sole in 2008—since then, she has performed recitals with SF Old First Concerts, the Piedmont Piano Company, St. Paul Towers, the San Francisco Conservatory, and the Crowden School. Vardanega is currently in her third year at Columbia University in the City of New York, studying both Political Science and Gender Studies, where she continued her musical studies with Seymour Lipkin and Maria Asteriadou. She just returned from a semester studying abroad at the University College London where she studied with Christopher Elton at the Royal Academy of Music. She is returning to Columbia University in the Spring where she will resume her musical studies with Maria Asteriadou.



New Esterházy Quartet
At The Opera II


Friday 27 November 2015 at 8:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is delighted to present the New Esterházy Quartet in the second program of their 2015-2016 new season. The artists of this celebrated San Francisco Bay Area string ensemble are internationally-known period instrument and chamber music specialists, and have gained a well-deserved reputation for virtuoso playing and interesting programs. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

The Artists:

Kati Kyme and Lisa Weiss - violin
David Wilson - viola *
William Skeen
- 'cello
(*for this performance David Wilson replaces Anthony Martin)


About the program:

In November, the NEQ will return to one of its favorite pastimes - exploring the lyricism and drama of operatic music in string quartet versions. This time, they concentrate on two treatments of Don Giovanni, one which you may find quite familiar, the other almost completely unknown. But as it happens, the story of Don Juan did not attract only Mozart's attention in 1787 - Giuseppe Gazzaniga's version also came out that same year. We hope you will enjoy returning to some music you know well, and finding out about another approach to this timeless story at our concerts this month.

You may recall that NEQ violist Anthony Martin was sidelined for our last concert, and he is still recuperating. This concert will include their friend and colleague David Wilson on viola. 


The Program:

Excerpts from Don Giovanni Tenorio (1787)  -  Giuseppe Gazzaniga (1743-1818)
    arranged for string quartet by William Skeen

Excerpts from Don Giovanni—Il dissoluto punito (1787)  -  Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
    anonymous late 18th century arrangement for string quartet


The Ensemble:

Founded in 2006 and currently in its eighth year of subscription concerts in San Francisco, Berkeley and Palo Alto, the New Esterházy Quartet continues to present masterworks of the classical period alongside intriguing works from less-familiar composers. With Haydn's 68 quartets as its core repertoire, NEQ is increasingly recognized as one of the world's top period-instrument string quartets. The ensemble has been presented by the San Francisco Early Music Society, Arizona Early Music Society, Carmel Chamber Music Society, has performed in New York and Los Angeles, and appeared as a Main Stage event for the 2012 Berkeley Festival & Exhibition. NEQ was also selected for Early Music America's Touring Artists Roster and has received two grants from the San Francisco Friends of Chamber Music. Recent seasons have featured works by pupils and admirers of Haydn, late quartets of Schubert and Beethoven, and novel explorations of early Bartók and Schoenberg. January 2014 saw the world premiere of Esterházy, book II, written for the ensemble by noted New York composer Paul Brantley. NEQ's 2014 summer project was the complete Mozart "Haydn" Quartets, performed at Berkeley's historic Hillside Club in a three-concert Amadè-Athon. The coming season will include an appearance on Pittsburgh's prestigious "Renaissance and Baroque" series in January and a summer cycle of the late Beethoven quartets. Four Haydn recordings are currently available, and a world premiere recording of a mid-19th century string quartet by Hungarian composer Imre Székely is near release.

The members of NEQ are internationally-known period-instrument and chamber music specialists: Kati Kyme and Lisa Weiss, violins, violist Anthony Martin, and cellist William Skeen. As individuals, the players have performed and recorded in the top echelon of early music ensembles worldwide. In addition to many years of musical collaboration in Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, American Bach Soloists, and a long list of renowned chamber ensembles, these four Bay Area musicians have enjoyed decades of friendship and shared experience. Their history as both colleagues and friends endows the quartet with an unusual commonality of musical language and gesture, and provides a strong foundation for a unique and original ensemble voice. In addition to concert appearances, NEQ enjoys performing in private homes and other intimate settings where the traditional experience of true chamber music is renewed and shared by players and listeners together.



New Esterházy Quartet
Padre, Guida, Ed Amico
A Trio Concert in Celebration of Friendship


Friday 30 October 2015 at 8:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is delighted to present the New Esterházy Quartet opening their new season (please note that the program has changed; see the note below). The artists of this celebrated San Francisco Bay Area string ensemble are internationally-known period instrument and chamber music specialists, and have gained a well-deserved reputation for virtuoso playing and interesting programs. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

The Artists:

Lisa Weiss - violin
Kati Kyme - viola
William Skeen
- 'cello



Program changes (A note from the NEQ):

Our plan for this concert has been disrupted by an injury to violist Anthony Martin's wrist that prevents him from playing this week. We considered trying to find a substitute but instead decided that it is in keeping with the theme of this program to honor our friend and colleague with a "get well" concert of trios by those two 18th century friends and colleagues Joseph Haydn and Wolfgang Mozart. We hope that as friends of NEQ you will enjoy this program which offers you the opportunity to hear one of Mozart's greatest and most inventive works in any medium, his Divertimento in Eb for violin, viola, and cello.


The Program:

Haydn: Trio in Bb
arr. Johannes Andre in 1790 from the piano sonata, Op. 53 No. 2
    Allegro
    Allegro di molto


Mozart: Trio in Bb, K. Anh. 163
arr. Andre from the violin sonata, K. 454
    Largo—Allegro
    Andante
    Allegretto

Haydn: Divertimento in C, Hob.XI:101
    Allegro
    Menuetto
    Finale

Mozart: Divertimento in Eb, K. 563
    Allegro
    Adagio
    Menuetto: Allegretto
    Andante
    Menuetto: Allegretto Allegro


The Ensemble:

Founded in 2006 and currently in its eighth year of subscription concerts in San Francisco, Berkeley and Palo Alto, the New Esterházy Quartet continues to present masterworks of the classical period alongside intriguing works from less-familiar composers. With Haydn's 68 quartets as its core repertoire, NEQ is increasingly recognized as one of the world's top period-instrument string quartets. The ensemble has been presented by the San Francisco Early Music Society, Arizona Early Music Society, Carmel Chamber Music Society, has performed in New York and Los Angeles, and appeared as a Main Stage event for the 2012 Berkeley Festival & Exhibition. NEQ was also selected for Early Music America's Touring Artists Roster and has received two grants from the San Francisco Friends of Chamber Music. Recent seasons have featured works by pupils and admirers of Haydn, late quartets of Schubert and Beethoven, and novel explorations of early Bartók and Schoenberg. January 2014 saw the world premiere of Esterházy, book II, written for the ensemble by noted New York composer Paul Brantley. NEQ's 2014 summer project was the complete Mozart "Haydn" Quartets, performed at Berkeley's historic Hillside Club in a three-concert Amadè-Athon. The coming season will include an appearance on Pittsburgh's prestigious "Renaissance and Baroque" series in January and a summer cycle of the late Beethoven quartets. Four Haydn recordings are currently available, and a world premiere recording of a mid-19th century string quartet by Hungarian composer Imre Székely is near release.

The members of NEQ are internationally-known period-instrument and chamber music specialists: Kati Kyme and Lisa Weiss, violins, violist Anthony Martin, and cellist William Skeen. As individuals, the players have performed and recorded in the top echelon of early music ensembles worldwide. In addition to many years of musical collaboration in Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, American Bach Soloists, and a long list of renowned chamber ensembles, these four Bay Area musicians have enjoyed decades of friendship and shared experience. Their history as both colleagues and friends endows the quartet with an unusual commonality of musical language and gesture, and provides a strong foundation for a unique and original ensemble voice. In addition to concert appearances, NEQ enjoys performing in private homes and other intimate settings where the traditional experience of true chamber music is renewed and shared by players and listeners together.





        Harvey Wainapel          Jane Lenoir              Ricardo Peixoto             Brian Rice                  Edinho Gerber           Rogério Souza

The Berkeley Choro Ensemble
In Concert
with
Duo Violão Brasil

Friday 2 October 2015 at 8:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is delighted to welcome The Berkeley Choro Ensemble, a quartet of brilliant local artists, in a concert of Brazilian music. Joining the ensemble will be Duo Violão Brasil featuring two virtuoso guitarists from Brasil, Rogério Souza and Edinho Gerber. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.


The Artists:

Berkeley Choro Ensemble
    Harvey Wainapel -
sax & clarinet
    Jane Lenoir - flute
    Ricardo Peixoto - guitar
    Brian Rice - percussion
 
Duo Violão Brasil
     Rogério Souza
- guitar
     Edinho Gerber
- guitar


About the Concert
:

Berkeley Choro Ensemble joins forces with Duo Violão Brasil to present a diverse program of compositions showcasing a history of Brazilian Popular Music. The group will appear in duo, trio and full ensemble settings, featuring Duo Guitar, Trio with Ricardo Peixoto, and members of Berkeley Choro in works by some of the great composers in Brazil , including Pixinguinha, Baden Powell,
Ernesto Nazareth, and others.


About the Ensembles:

The Berkeley Choro Ensemble (pronounced "shoro"), is a group of world-class musicians from the SF Bay Area that made its debut in January, 2010, at the Berkeley Public Library. The group celebrates the music, culture and history of Brazil, with a special emphasis on the Choro genre, a style of music which emerged in the 1800's in Brazil, fusing the music of Brazil's European immigrants and the native music of Brazil's indigenous and African-Brazilian population. In particular, the choro sound is somewhat akin to a combination of European classical music, ragtime, and blues. Historically, the choro style influenced Brazil's most famous classical composer, Heitor Villa Lobos, to compose some of the world's most hauntingly beautiful music, the Bachianas Brasileiras. Our repertoire also includes samba, bossa nova, jazz, and the music of Northeast Brazil.

Duo Violão Brasil is the result of guitarists Rogério Souza and Edinho Gerber's reverence for Brazilian guitar, the “violão”, and their desire to explore and expand the musical possibilities of putting two “violões" together. With repertoire from composers like Pixinguinha, Baden Powell, and Tom Jobim, the duo navigates effortlessly through the many styles of 20th century Brazilian popular music while showcasing original works and inventive arrangements.


About the Artists:

From a family of professional musicians, flutist Jane Lenoir grew up in Tampa, Florida, and left home at 15 as a SCHOLARSHIP student to the Interlochen Arts Academy in Michigan and then to Oberlin Conservatory of Music. A performer comfortable in many diverse styles, Jane appears regularly as a soloist, chamber player, orchestral musician, and jazz performer. She first began her study of Brazilian music in 2006, and has since performed with Marcos Silva, Jovino Santos Neto, Hermeto Pascoal, and recorded with Carlos Oliveira and Ceilia Medeiros, Live at Anna's Jazz Island and Brazilian Choro 2009. In 2010 she visited Brazil and studied with Hermeto Pascoal, Jovino Santos Neto, Paulo Sergio Santos, Allessandro Pennezzi and Ted Falcon. She is principal flutist with the Music in the Mountains Festival Orchestra in Grass Valley, and also performs with Sexteto Matiz, an Afro-Cuban ensemble, and numerous jazz, and new music and chamber ensembles in styles ranging from early music (baroque flute) to free improvisation.


Saxophonist/clarinetist Harvey Wainapel (pronounced "wine-apple") has performed with the likes of McCoy Tyner, Joe Lovano, Ray Charles, Dave Brubeck, and Joe Henderson. Besides working with these and numerous other leaders, Wainapel has toured extensively under his own name, and has performed in 22 countries. His heavy involvement with the music of Brazil has led to performances with top-level musicians such as Airto Moreira, Flora Purim, Dori Caymmi, Guinga, and Jovino Santos Neto. Wainapel was a featured soloist on two CDs that were final nominees for Latin Grammy Awards™ "Best Latin Jazz Recording" (with Jovino Santos Neto in 2004 and with Mark Levine in 2003). Harvey has been called "one of the most promising and versatile players of his generation" (All Music Guide to Jazz 1998)

Originally from Rio de Janeiro and based in the Bay Area, guitarist/composer Ricardo Peixoto is among the top representatives of Brazilian guitar in the US, with a fluid melodic style and a keen compositional sense. His performances explore Brazil's rich and diverse traditions, both in his original work as well as in arrangements of Brazilian classics. His approach is grounded both in the jazz and Brazilian music traditions, but always ventures well beyond their borders, combining rich melodies, sophisticated harmonies, and the unmistakable rhythms of Brazil. Ricardo came to the US on a scholarship to the Berkeley School of Music in Boston, and later continued his studies in classical guitar at the SF Conservatory of Music. He has recorded, performed, and collaborated with, among others, Claudia Villela, Flora Purim and Airto, saxophonist Bud Shank, percussionist Dom Um Romão, Toots Thielemans, Dori Caymmi, Guinga, guitarist Carlos Oliveira, Harvey Wainapel, Marcos Silva and Terra Sul. He has performed throughout the US, Europe, Canada, Japan and Brazil.

Percussionist Brian Rice graduated from the Interlochen Arts Academy and Oberlin College Conservatory of Music with a B.M. in Percussion Performance and Ethnomusicology. A well-rounded musician, Brian is a highly acclaimed performer, educator and recording artist adept at numerous musical styles ranging from classical and jazz, to Latin, Afro-Cuban, and Brazilian, to contemporary and experimental music. Brian's study of the Brazilian pandeiro began in 1986 when the Sao Paulo State University percussion ensemble visited Oberlin and percussionist/composer Carlos Stasi, then a student at SPSU, gave Brian a quick pandeiro lesson after the concert. Since then Brian's obsession with the pandeiro has led him to study with Guello, Marcos Suzano, Airto, Claudio Bueno and Clarice Magalhaes, and his prowess on the instrument has led him to perform with numerous Brazilian artists including, Jovino Santos Neto, Paulo Sergio Santos, Danilo Brito, Dudu Maia and Jorge Alabe. It was studies with Marcos Suzano that inspired Brian to expand his use of the pandeiro outside the Brazilian music world and apply it to Balkan, Celtic, Middle Eastern, Spanish, and Cuban music with great effect.

Son of a Brazilian mother and American father, guitarist and composer Edinho Gerber possesses a rich musical vocabulary developed in the two countries where he was raised: the United States and Brazil. Navigating effortlessly between the genres of choro, jazz, samba, and blues, he is always in search of the intersection points within his dual cultural identity. A staple in the Chicago music scene for many years, he was a highly in demand sideman having played with countless U.S. based Brazilian groups, including Som Brasil, Renato Anesi Trio, A Cor do Brasil, and led the samba-jazz group Zona Sul. He has performed in prestigious festivals and concerts in throughout the United States, Russia, and Japan, and currently resides in Rio de Janeiro where he performs regularly with Duo Violão Brasil and is preparing for the upcoming releases of his debut solo album and of an inventive new cross cultural collaboration with Ben Lamar.

Rogério Souza
is a guitarist, composer and arranger from Rio de Janeiro. He is one of the most important representatives of the genuine Brazilian guitar tradition. Has since his professional debut in the early 1980's been involved in big events in the Brazilian popular music, specially the choro and the samba, participating as musician, arranger and music director in tv sessions, recordings and concerts. Rogério has played and recorded with a variety of Brazilian top-artists, including Baden Powell, Sivuca, Raphael Rabello, Turibio Santos, Paulinho da Viola, João Bosco, Ney Matogrosso, Ivan Lins, Elizeth Cardoso, Dona Ivone Lara, Elsa Soares, Zélia Duncan, Leila Pinheiro, Paulo Moura, Guinga, Altamiro Carrilho, Cristóvão Bastos and the choro-group Época De Ouro.




New Esterházy Quartet
Summer Strings Festival
Beethoven:
The Complete Late Quartets

Wednesday 26 August 2015 at 8:00pm
Friday 28 August 2015 at 8:00pm
Sunday 30 August 2015 at 4:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is proud to present a very special series of concerts featuring the New Esterházy Quartet performing all six of Beethoven's famous "Late Quartets" in three concerts over five days. The artists of this celebrated San Francisco Bay Area string ensemble are internationally-known period instrument and chamber music specialists, and have gained a well-deserved reputation for virtuoso playing and interesting programs. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

The Artists:

Kati Kyme & Lisa Weiss - violins
Anthony Martin - viola
William Skeen - 'cello


The Concerts:

In the last several years of his life, Beethoven created a series of six string quartets of surpassing beauty, subtlety, and sophistication. These pieces have become known as the "Late Quartets." At the time of their composition, however, Beethoven's contemporaries didn't know what to make of them; one commented that "we know there is something there, but we do not know what it is." Composer and conductor Louis Spohr called them "indecipherable, uncorrected horrors." Since that time, however, these works have become revered by generations of musicians, scholars, and listeners alike. We are delighted to have our Ensemble in Residence bring this remarkable cycle of music to life in a late summer celebration.


The Programs:

Ludwig van Beethoven

Wednesday 26 August 2015 at 8:00pm
String Quartet No. 12 in E-flat major, Op.127:
String Quartet No. 13 in B-flat major, Op. 130

Friday 28 August 2015 at 8:00pm
String Quartet No. 16 in F major, Op.135
String Quartet No. 15 in A minor, Op.132

Sunday 30 August 2015 at 4:00pm
String Quartet No. 14 in C-sharp minor, Op.131
Große Fuge in B-flat major for string quartet, Op.133


The Ensemble:

Founded in 2006 and currently in its eighth year of subscription concerts in San Francisco, Berkeley and Palo Alto, the New Esterházy Quartet continues to present masterworks of the classical period alongside intriguing works from less-familiar composers. With Haydn's 68 quartets as its core repertoire, NEQ is increasingly recognized as one of the world's top period-instrument string quartets. The ensemble has been presented by the San Francisco Early Music Society, Arizona Early Music Society, Carmel Chamber Music Society, has performed in New York and Los Angeles, and appeared as a Main Stage event for the 2012 Berkeley Festival & Exhibition. NEQ was also selected for Early Music America's Touring Artists Roster and has received two grants from the San Francisco Friends of Chamber Music. Recent seasons have featured works by pupils and admirers of Haydn, late quartets of Schubert and Beethoven, and novel explorations of early Bartók and Schoenberg. January 2014 saw the world premiere of Esterházy, book II, written for the ensemble by noted New York composer Paul Brantley. NEQ's 2014 summer project was the complete Mozart "Haydn" Quartets, performed at Berkeley's historic Hillside Club in a three-concert Amadè-Athon. The coming season will include an appearance on Pittsburgh's prestigious "Renaissance and Baroque" series in January and a summer cycle of the late Beethoven quartets. Four Haydn recordings are currently available, and a world premiere recording of a mid-19th century string quartet by Hungarian composer Imre Székely is near release.

The members of NEQ are internationally-known period-instrument and chamber music specialists: Kati Kyme and Lisa Weiss, violins, violist Anthony Martin, and cellist William Skeen. As individuals, the players have performed and recorded in the top echelon of early music ensembles worldwide. In addition to many years of musical collaboration in Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, American Bach Soloists, and a long list of renowned chamber ensembles, these four Bay Area musicians have enjoyed decades of friendship and shared experience. Their history as both colleagues and friends endows the quartet with an unusual commonality of musical language and gesture, and provides a strong foundation for a unique and original ensemble voice. In addition to concert appearances, NEQ enjoys performing in private homes and other intimate settings where the traditional experience of true chamber music is renewed and shared by players and listeners together.





         Jeremy Constant                       Polina Sedukh                           Adam Smyla                                   Amos Yang

Sun Valley Quartet

Beethoven and Bach

Sunday 14 June 2015 at 7:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is thrilled to host the return of the Sun Valley Quartet, an ensemble of virtuoso players, to our Concert Series. They will be performing one of Beethoven's Late Quartets, along with one of Bach's suites for solo cello.  (And there's a secret ... this super-group are performing in maschera  - in real life they are all mild-mannered members of the San Francisco Symphony!) Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

The Sun Valley Quartet are:
     Jeremy Constant
- violin
     Polina Sedukh - violin
     Adam Smyla - viola
     Amos Yang - cello



The Concert:

In the last several years of his life, Beethoven created a series of six string quartets of surpassing beauty, subtlety, and sophistication. These pieces have become known as the "Late Quartets." At the time of their composition, however, Beethoven's contemporaries didn't know what to make of them; one commented that "we know there is something there, but we do not know what it is." Composer and conductor Louis Spohr called them "indecipherable, uncorrected horrors." Since that time, however, these works have become revered by generations musicians, scholars, and listeners alike. One of these, Beethoven's String Quartet No. 15 in A minor, Opus 132, takes it's nickname, "Heiliger Dankgesang " (Holy song of thanksgiving) from a note the composer wrote on the score, expressing his thanks for his recovery from a lengthy illness. It's a monumental piece of music.

The Bach suites for solo cello are some of the most exquisite works ever written for that instrument, and are a beloved part of the repertoire of the virtuoso cellist. Amos Yang's reading of the Suite No. 5 will start our evening's performance.


The Program:

Suite No. 5 in C minor for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1011 - Johann Sebastian Bach
    1. Prélude
    2. Allemande
    3. Courante
    4. Sarabande
    5. Gavotte I
    6. Gavotte II
    7. Gigue

String Quartet No. 15 in A minor, Op. 132, 
("Heiliger Dankgesang") -  Ludwig van Beethoven
    1. Assai sostenuto – Allegro
    2. Allegro ma non tanto
    3. Molto adagio
    4. Alla marcia, assai vivace
    5. Allegro appassionato


The Artists:

After winning the Grand Prize in the 1979 Du Maurier competition in Canada, violinist Jeremy Constant studied in New York with Ivan Galamian and then with the great violinist Itzhak Perlman before making the San Francisco Bay Area his home. He became a member of the San Francisco Symphony in 1984, with whom he continues to perform as Assistant Concertmaster. He has been Concertmaster of the Marin Symphony since 1994 and in 2000 was named Concertmaster of the Sun Valley Summer Symphony. He is a frequent soloist with the orchestra and participant in the Edgar M. Bronfman Chamber Series. As an active soloist and chamber musician both here and abroad, Jeremy has performed on radio and television around the world. He was violinist in the San Francisco Piano Trio, and a founding member of the Navarro Trio and Navarro Quartet. He can be heard as Assistant Concertmaster on Grammy Award winning releases such as the continuing Mahler cycle by the San Francisco Symphony and can been seen on their ongoing television project Keeping Score. Jeremy plays the ex-Heberlein Stradivarius from the year 1700, which was donated to the San Francisco Symphony for his exclusive use. Residing in Oakland with his wife Sharon, Jeremy is a pilot who took over 7 years to build a plane which he currently enjoys flying.

Born to a family of musicians in St. Petersburg, Russia, Polina Sedukh began studying violin at the age of four, her first teachers being her father Grigory Sedukh and Savely Shalman. She is a graduate of Special Music School of the St. Petersburg Conservatory, and the Rimsky-Korsakov State Conservatory, where she studied under the guidance of Lev Ivaschenko and Vladimir Ovtcharek. She also holds Artist Diploma from Longy School of Music in Cambridge, MA, where she studied with Laura Bossert and Malcolm Lowe. Prizewinner of the International Spohr Competition in Weimar, Germany, Ms. Sedukh made her solo orchestral debut at the age of seven with the Chamber Orchestra of Liepaya, Latvia and has since appeared as soloist with St. Petersburg State Symphony Orchestra, Boston Virtuosi Orchestra, St.Petersburg Capella Symphony Orchestra, Newton Symphony Orchestra and Weimer State Capella Orchestra. Following her passion for symphonic music, Ms. Sedukh pursued career in major American orchestras, presently being a member of 2nd violin section of San Francisco Symphony since 2009, and having previously served as a member of Boston Symphony Orchestra from 2004 to 2007.

At age 17, violist Adam Smyla won the first prize at the National Viola Competition in his native Poland. Within six months, he became the youngest member of the Polish National Radio and Television Orchestra and was invited to join the Penderecki String Quartet with whom he toured throughout the world for nearly a decade. Adam was Assistant Principal Violist of the Chicago Lyric Opera and Principal Violist of the Concertanti di Chicago before becoming a member of the San Francisco Symphony in 2000. Adam appears frequently in chamber music concerts throughout the Bay Area, often in collaboration with his wife, pianist Edna Koren.

Amos Yang
is the Assistant Principal cellist for the San Francisco Symphony. He has performed as a soloist and chamber musician throughout the U.S., the Far East and Europe. He has also collaborated in chamber music with the Ying Quartet, the Turtle Island String Quartet, pianists Ann Schein and Melvin Chen, violinist Earl Carlyss and composer Bright Sheng. Yang’s awards include the Performer’s Certificate at Eastman School of Music and first prizes in the American String Teacher’s Association and Grace Vamos competitions. He was finalist in the Pierre Fournier International Cello Competition and was awarded the CD Jackson Prize at the Tanglewood Music Festival for outstanding musical contribution. As cellist of the Maia String Quartet from 1996-2002, Yang was involved in many educational programs, performing throughout the country for schools under the auspices of such organizations as Arts Excel, Young Audiences Inc. and the Midori Foundation. During this time he also served on the faculties of the Peabody Conservatory, the University of Iowa, Grinnell College and the Interlochen Advanced String Quartet Institute. Yang holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the Juilliard School of Music. Before joining the San Francisco Symphony, Yang was a member of the Seattle Symphony, maintaining a private teaching studio as well as cultivating an active solo and chamber music life. Born and raised in San Francisco, he was a member of the San Francisco Symphony Youth Orchestra and San Francisco Boys Choir.






New Esterházy Quartet
Haydn Cantatas and Quartets
featuring soprano Christine Brandes

Friday 5 June 2015 at 8:00pm
The Berkeley Hillside Club is excited to have our Ensemble in Residence, the New Esterházy Quartet close out their 2014-2015 regular season with some very special music. The artists of this celebrated San Francisco Bay Area string ensemble are internationally-known period-instrument and chamber music specialists and have gained a well-deserved reputation for virtuoso playing and interesting programs. This all-Haydn concert will include two dramatic Haydn cantatas, featuring soprano Christine Brandes, as well as two of the master's string quartets. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.



The Artists:

Kati Kyme
& Lisa Weiss - violins
Anthony Martin - viola
William Skeen - 'cello

with special guest
Christine Brandes - soprano


The Program:

Joseph Haydn:

    Quartet in D, Op. 71, No. 2 (1793)

    Arianna a Naxos (1789)

    Quartet in F minor, Op. 55, No. 2 (1788)

    Scena di Berenice (1795)


About he Program: 

“It’s time for some handbag-throwing!” says soprano Christine Brandes, referring to the two dramatic Haydn cantatas about wronged women
she performs with the New Esterházy Quartet. Violinist Kati Kyme says: “We enjoy our collaboration with Chris for so many reasons! Her sense of humor, our common ground of musical experiences, and her world-class artistry all add up to a great time musically and socially.”

Also on the program are two exceptional Haydn quartets: Op. 71, No. 2 and Op. 55, No. 2, “The Razor.” The latter derives its nickname from a complaint of Haydn to his friend, the publisher John Bland, that he would give his best quartet for a pair of decent razors. As the anecdote continues, Bland hurried to his own lodgings and returned with two English razors, whereupon Haydn gave him this quartet. Whether it was actually his “best quartet” to date we can’t know (it has a lot of competition), but it is certainly extraordinary. The second movement in particular is like nothing on earth. Haydn had many ways to modulate from key to key, but here he uses the simplest of all: pause for two bars, then restart in any new key you like. You have no idea what will come next, and that’s the whole fun of it.


The Ensemble:

Founded in 2006 and currently in its eighth year of subscription concerts in San Francisco, Berkeley and Palo Alto, the New Esterházy Quartet continues to present masterworks of the classical period alongside intriguing works from less-familiar composers. With Haydn's 68 quartets as its core repertoire, NEQ is increasingly recognized as one of the world's top period-instrument string quartets. The ensemble has been presented by the San Francisco Early Music Society, Arizona Early Music Society, Carmel Chamber Music Society, has performed in New York and Los Angeles, and appeared as a Main Stage event for the 2012 Berkeley Festival & Exhibition. NEQ was also selected for Early Music America's Touring Artists Roster and has received two grants from the San Francisco Friends of Chamber Music. Recent seasons have featured works by pupils and admirers of Haydn, late quartets of Schubert and Beethoven, and novel explorations of early Bartók and Schoenberg. January 2014 saw the world premiere of Esterházy, book II, written for the ensemble by noted New York composer Paul Brantley. NEQ's 2014 summer project was the complete Mozart "Haydn" Quartets, performed at Berkeley's historic Hillside Club in a three-concert Amadè-Athon. The coming season will include an appearance on Pittsburgh's prestigious "Renaissance and Baroque" series in January and a summer cycle of the late Beethoven quartets. Four Haydn recordings are currently available, and a world premiere recording of a mid-19th century string quartet by Hungarian composer Imre Székely is near release.

The members of NEQ are internationally-known period-instrument and chamber music specialists: Kati Kyme and Lisa Weiss, violins, violist Anthony Martin, and cellist William Skeen. As individuals, the players have performed and recorded in the top echelon of early music ensembles worldwide. In addition to many years of musical collaboration in Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, American Bach Soloists, and a long list of renowned chamber ensembles, these four Bay Area musicians have enjoyed decades of friendship and shared experience. Their history as both colleagues and friends endows the quartet with an unusual commonality of musical language and gesture, and provides a strong foundation for a unique and original ensemble voice. In addition to concert appearances, NEQ enjoys performing in private homes and other intimate settings where the traditional experience of true chamber music is renewed and shared by players and listeners together.




                    Victor Romasevich    Michael Jones                                                   Stephen Levintow     Paul Rhodes

The Jupiter Chamber Players
play Haydn, Brahms, and Shebalin

Sunday 31 May 2015 at 7:00p

The Berkeley Hillside Club is delighted to welcome one of our favorite string ensembles, the Jupiter Chamber Players, back to our Concert Series They will be performing quartets by Haydn, Brahms, and Shebalin Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

The Jupiter Chamber Players are:
            Victor Romasevich & Michael Jones - violins
            Stephen Levintow - viola
            Paul Rhodes - cello

The program:

String Quartet Op. 76 #2 in D minor - Joseph Haydn

String Quartet #2, Op.19 in B flat Major- Vissarion Shebalin

String Quartet #3, Op.67 in B flat Major - Johannes Brahms

The artists:

n 1997, two veteran freelancers, violinist Michael Jones and Juilliard-trained violist Steve Levintow, recruited BBC Orchestra violinist Andrew Davies and cellist Paul Hale of the Oakland Symphony to found the Jupiter Chamber Players. The group had the good fortune to connect with Marvin Sanders, director of Live Oak Concerts at the Berkeley Art Center, just as the Center's previous ensemble-in-residence, the Cypress Quartet, left to launch their international career. The Art Center remained the Jupiter's "home" venue for 10 years. Paul Rhodes replaced Hale in 2000, bringing his years of experience in numerous orchestras and as soloist with the Carmel Bach Festival. Two years later, Davies left to pursue other projects, and San Francisco Symphony member Victor Romasevich took over as first violinist. Romasevich brought deep fascination with Russian chamber music, including masterworks by such composers as Sergei Taneyev, Georgy Catoire, and Iosif Andriasov (with whom Romasevich studied violin and viola) - all links in a tradition going back to Tchaikovsky through the Moscow Conservatory. The Jupiter Chamber Players take pleasure in introducing wider audiences to the work of these composers,  while continuing also to present more familiar Russian and European repertoir




New Esterházy Quartet
Haydn & His Students VII


Friday 24 April 2015 at 8:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is pleased to have our Ensemble in Residence, the New Esterházy Quartet welcome Spring with their sonorous strings, performing the latest in their "Haydn and His Students" concerts. The artists of this celebrated San Francisco Bay Area string ensemble are internationally-known period-instrument and chamber music specialists and have gained a well-deserved reputation for virtuoso playing and interesting programs. This concert will feature music from Haydn, Beethoven, and Struck. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.



The Artists:

Kati Kyme
& Lisa Weiss - violins
Anthony Martin - viola
William Skeen - 'cello


Divertimento in Eb, Op. 1, “No. 0” (c. 1758) Joseph Haydn (1732–1809)

Quartet in C, Op. 2 (1797) Paul Struck (1776–1820)

Quartet in C# minor, Op. 131 (1826) Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827)


The Program: 

Since the fall of 2010, the New Esterházy Quartet have performed six episodes in the “Haydn and His Students” series. Every single one of these programs featured a quartet by Haydn himself, one by Beethoven, and one by a less famous student, thus introducing Bay Area audiences to the works of Eybler, Titz, Wranitzky, Reicha, Zmeskall, Pleyel, and Lessel. This time the honor goes to Paul Struck (1776-1820), whose “Quartet in C, Op. 2” rounds out the program between Haydn’s “alpha” and Beethoven’s “omega.” Struck studied with Haydn in the late 1790s and published his Opus 1 and 2 in 1797. The first, three piano trios, was dedicated to Haydn. The second is the “String Quartet in C” on this program. Later, Struck traveled all over Europe. When in Stockholm, he helped produce the first performance of Haydn’s “Creation” there in 1801.


The Ensemble:

Founded in 2006 and currently in its eighth year of subscription concerts in San Francisco, Berkeley and Palo Alto, the New Esterházy Quartet continues to present masterworks of the classical period alongside intriguing works from less-familiar composers. With Haydn's 68 quartets as its core repertoire, NEQ is increasingly recognized as one of the world's top period-instrument string quartets. The ensemble has been presented by the San Francisco Early Music Society, Arizona Early Music Society, Carmel Chamber Music Society, has performed in New York and Los Angeles, and appeared as a Main Stage event for the 2012 Berkeley Festival & Exhibition. NEQ was also selected for Early Music America's Touring Artists Roster and has received two grants from the San Francisco Friends of Chamber Music. Recent seasons have featured works by pupils and admirers of Haydn, late quartets of Schubert and Beethoven, and novel explorations of early Bartók and Schoenberg. January 2014 saw the world premiere of Esterházy, book II, written for the ensemble by noted New York composer Paul Brantley. NEQ's 2014 summer project was the complete Mozart "Haydn" Quartets, performed at Berkeley's historic Hillside Club in a three-concert Amadè-Athon. The coming season will include an appearance on Pittsburgh's prestigious "Renaissance and Baroque" series in January and a summer cycle of the late Beethoven quartets. Four Haydn recordings are currently available, and a world premiere recording of a mid-19th century string quartet by Hungarian composer Imre Székely is near release.

The members of NEQ are internationally-known period-instrument and chamber music specialists: Kati Kyme and Lisa Weiss, violins, violist Anthony Martin, and cellist William Skeen. As individuals, the players have performed and recorded in the top echelon of early music ensembles worldwide. In addition to many years of musical collaboration in Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, American Bach Soloists, and a long list of renowned chamber ensembles, these four Bay Area musicians have enjoyed decades of friendship and shared experience. Their history as both colleagues and friends endows the quartet with an unusual commonality of musical language and gesture, and provides a strong foundation for a unique and original ensemble voice. In addition to concert appearances, NEQ enjoys performing in private homes and other intimate settings where the traditional experience of true chamber music is renewed and shared by players and listeners together.




               Harvey Wainapel                Jane Lenoir                            Ricardo Peixoto                             Brian Rice

The Berkeley Choro Ensemble
In Concert

Friday 20 March 2015 at 8:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is delighted to welcome The Berkeley Choro Ensemble, a quartet of brilliant local artists, in a concert of Brazilian Choro music. The concert will feature the works by such classic Brazilian composers as Pixinguinha and Jacob do Bandolim, contemporary Brazilian composers, as well as original compositions from ensemble members Harvey Wainapel, Ricardo Peixoto. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

The Artists:

Harvey Wainapel - sax & clarinet
Jane Lenoir - flute
Ricardo Peixoto - guitar
Brian Rice - percussion

The Ensemble:

The Berkeley Choro Ensemble (pronounced "shoro"), is a group of world-class musicians from the SF Bay Area that made its debut in January, 2010, at the Berkeley Public Library. The group celebrates the music, culture and history of Brazil, with a special emphasis on the Choro genre, a style of music which emerged in the 1800's in Brazil, fusing the music of Brazil's European immigrants and the native music of Brazil's indigenous and African-Brazilian population. In particular, the choro sound is somewhat akin to a combination of European classical music, ragtime, and blues. Historically, the choro style influenced Brazil's most famous classical composer, Heitor Villa Lobos, to compose some of the world's most hauntingly beautiful music, the Bachianas Brasileiras. Our repertoire also includes samba, bossa nova, jazz, and the music of Northeast Brazil.

The Artists:

From a family of professional musicians, flutist Jane Lenoir grew up in Tampa, Florida, and left home at 15 as a SCHOLARSHIP student to the Interlochen Arts Academy in Michigan and then to Oberlin Conservatory of Music. A performer comfortable in many diverse styles, Jane appears regularly as a soloist, chamber player, orchestral musician, and jazz performer. She first began her study of Brazilian music in 2006, and has since performed with Marcos Silva, Jovino Santos Neto, Hermeto Pascoal, and recorded with Carlos Oliveira and Ceilia Medeiros, Live at Anna's Jazz Island and Brazilian Choro 2009. In 2010 she visited Brazil and studied with Hermeto Pascoal, Jovino Santos Neto, Paulo Sergio Santos, Allessandro Pennezzi and Ted Falcon. She is principal flutist with the Music in the Mountains Festival Orchestra in Grass Valley, and also performs with Sexteto Matiz, an Afro-Cuban ensemble, and numerous jazz, and new music and chamber ensembles in styles ranging from early music (baroque flute) to free improvisation.


Saxophonist/clarinetist Harvey Wainapel (pronounced "wine-apple") has performed with the likes of McCoy Tyner, Joe Lovano, Ray Charles, Dave Brubeck, and Joe Henderson. Besides working with these and numerous other leaders, Wainapel has toured extensively under his own name, and has performed in 22 countries. His heavy involvement with the music of Brazil has led to performances with top-level musicians such as Airto Moreira, Flora Purim, Dori Caymmi, Guinga, and Jovino Santos Neto. Wainapel was a featured soloist on two CDs that were final nominees for Latin Grammy Awards™ "Best Latin Jazz Recording" (with Jovino Santos Neto in 2004 and with Mark Levine in 2003). Harvey has been called "one of the most promising and versatile players of his generation" (All Music Guide to Jazz 1998)

Originally from Rio de Janeiro and based in the Bay Area, guitarist/composer Ricardo Peixoto is among the top representatives of Brazilian guitar in the US, with a fluid melodic style and a keen compositional sense. His performances explore Brazil's rich and diverse traditions, both in his original work as well as in arrangements of Brazilian classics. His approach is grounded both in the jazz and Brazilian music traditions, but always ventures well beyond their borders, combining rich melodies, sophisticated harmonies, and the unmistakable rhythms of Brazil. Ricardo came to the US on a scholarship to the Berkeley School of Music in Boston, and later continued his studies in classical guitar at the SF Conservatory of Music. He has recorded, performed, and collaborated with, among others, Claudia Villela, Flora Purim and Airto, saxophonist Bud Shank, percussionist Dom Um Romão, Toots Thielemans, Dori Caymmi, Guinga, guitarist Carlos Oliveira, Harvey Wainapel, Marcos Silva and Terra Sul. He has performed throughout the US, Europe, Canada, Japan and Brazil.

Percussionist Brian Rice graduated from the Interlochen Arts Academy and Oberlin College Conservatory of Music with a B.M. in Percussion Performance and Ethnomusicology. A well-rounded musician, Brian is a highly acclaimed performer, educator and recording artist adept at numerous musical styles ranging from classical and jazz, to Latin, Afro-Cuban, and Brazilian, to contemporary and experimental music. Brian's study of the Brazilian pandeiro began in 1986 when the Sao Paulo State University percussion ensemble visited Oberlin and percussionist/composer Carlos Stasi, then a student at SPSU, gave Brian a quick pandeiro lesson after the concert. Since then Brian's obsession with the pandeiro has led him to study with Guello, Marcos Suzano, Airto, Claudio Bueno and Clarice Magalhaes, and his prowess on the instrument has led him to perform with numerous Brazilian artists including, Jovino Santos Neto, Paulo Sergio Santos, Danilo Brito, Dudu Maia and Jorge Alabe. It was studies with Marcos Suzano that inspired Brian to expand his use of the pandeiro outside the Brazilian music world and apply it to Balkan, Celtic, Middle Eastern, Spanish, and Cuban music with great effect.






Audrey Vardanega
In Recital



Sunday 15 March 2015 at 7:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is excited to present a phenomenal young pianist in program of Romantic masterpieces. Oakland born and raised, Audrey Vardanega made her Midsummer Mozart Festival debut in 2010 at age 14. In the five years since then, Vardanega has earned high praise from audiences and critics, who describe her as playing "with an astonishing beauty and maturity beyond her years." Don't miss this remarkable artist performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

The Concert:

This concert will showcase great romantic piano works like Liszt's Vallee D'Obermann as well as Schumann's hefty Symphonic Etudes for Piano. The juxtaposition of Liszt's Vallee D'Obermann and Schumann's Symphonic Etudes will provide a lens into two very different types of pianistic Romanticism. Both very virtuosic pieces, Vallee D'Obermann represents the acme of emotional, romantic expression, with rich harmonies and soaring melodies reminiscent of a hero's internal struggle and utter confusion with nature. Vallee D'Obermann is the musical representation of an existential crisis. On the other hand, Schumann's Symphonic Etudes are harder to understand as they lack the programatic nature of Vallee D'Obermann. Each Symphonic Etude is a variation on the theme (the first etude), leading to a buoyant finale. In each variation on the theme, it's as if Schumann presents a different perspective on the same issue presented with the theme.


The Program:

Piano Sonata No. 17 in D minor "The Tempest" Op. 31 No. 2 - Ludwig Van Beethoven

Vallee D'Obermann from Annees des Pelerinages, Premiere Annee: Suisse - Franz Liszt

Symphonic Etudes (1852 - Études en forme de variations) Op . 13 - Robert Schumann

The Artist:

Praised as a player “with the kind of freedom, authority, and strength…that one expects from the world’s finest pianists,” Audrey Vardanega, a nineteen-year-old pianist and composer born and raised in Oakland, California, began her piano studies at the Alameda Starland Music Center at the age of six. Vardanega began formal piano training with acclaimed pianist Robert Schwartz at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music from 2002 to 2013 as well as formal composition training with Arkadi Serper at the Berkeley Crowden School from 2004 to 2013. She has also received piano instruction from Gary Graffman, Paul Hersh, Lang Lang, Jon Nakamatsu, Paul Roberts, Meng-Chieh Liu, Yefim Bronfman, and Richard Goode. Vardanega made her debut as the youngest soloist in the history of the Midsummer Mozart Festival under the baton of the acclaimed Maestro George Cleve in the summer of 2010, appearing again with the orchestra in recent years. Among others, Vardanega has also appeared as a soloist with San Francisco’s Symphony Parnassus and the San Francisco Chamber Orchestra. Vardanega made her solo recital debut at IMG Artists’ Festival Del Sole in 2008—since then, she has performed recitals with SF Old First Concerts, the Piedmont Piano Company, St. Paul Towers, the San Francisco Conservatory, and the Crowden School. Vardanega is currently a sophomore at Columbia University in the City of New York, studying both Political Science and Gender Studies. She currently continues her piano studies with Seymour Lipkin at the Juilliard School of Music in New York. Audrey plans to work hard at an internship this summer in New York City and study abroad in London next Fall.




New Esterházy Quartet
Mozart at the Opera

Friday 6 March  2015 at 8:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is pleased to welcome back our Ensemble in Residence, the New Esterházy Quartet, for their second concert of the year. The artists of this celebrated San Francisco Bay Area string ensemble are internationally-known period-instrument and chamber music specialists and have gained a well-deserved reputation for virtuoso playing and interesting programs. This concert will feature music from Mozart's Abduction from the Seraglio and The Marriage of Figaro in 18th Century arrangements for string quartet. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.


The Artists:
Kati Kyme & Lisa Weiss - violins
Anthony Martin - viola
William Skeen - 'cello



The Program:

Mozart at the Opera

The Abduction from the Seraglio, K. 384 (1782)
 
Overture
Hier soll ich dich denn sehen — in front of the palace of the Pasha Selim, Belmonte dreams of seeing his beloved Constanze again
Singt dem grossen Pascha — Selim’s janissaries (palace guards) sing his praises
Durch Zärtlichkeit und Schmeicheln — Constanze’s maid Blonde suggests that her Turkish captor Osmin try a little tenderness
Martern aller Arten — in a bravura aria Constanze defies the advances of Selim
Welche Wonne welche Lust — Blonde rejoices in the captives’ imminent rescue
Wenn der Freude Thränen fliessen — Belmonte celebrates his reunion with Constanze
Im Mohrenland — Pedrillo, Belmonte’s servant, sings a ballad about capture and rescue
Ha! wie will ich Triumphiren — Osmin seemingly foils the rescue attempt
Finale: Vaudeville — in which Selim countermands Osmin and sets the captives free

intermission

The Marriage of Figaro, K. 492 (1786)

Overture

Cinque, dieci, venti, trenta — Figaro and Susanna prepare for their wedding
Se vuol ballare — Figaro intends to thwart Count Almaviva’s dastardly plans
La vendetta — Doctor Bartolo intends to break up Figaro and Susanna
Non so più cosa son — Cherubino is suffering from a teenage crush
Non piu andrai — the cure for Cherubino’s cravings is a stint of military service
Porgi amor — the Countess longs for the return of love
Voi che sapete — Cherubino is still tormented by unfamiliar feelings
Riconosci in questo amplesso — schemes and revelations in a grand sextet
Dove sono — the Countess, humiliated, wishes things were again as they once were
Gente, gente — all plots are finally unraveled and the various couples reunited

The Ensemble:

Founded in 2006 and currently in its eighth year of subscription concerts in San Francisco, Berkeley and Palo Alto, the New Esterházy Quartet continues to present masterworks of the classical period alongside intriguing works from less-familiar composers. With Haydn's 68 quartets as its core repertoire, NEQ is increasingly recognized as one of the world's top period-instrument string quartets. The ensemble has been presented by the San Francisco Early Music Society, Arizona Early Music Society, Carmel Chamber Music Society, has performed in New York and Los Angeles, and appeared as a Main Stage event for the 2012 Berkeley Festival & Exhibition. NEQ was also selected for Early Music America's Touring Artists Roster and has received two grants from the San Francisco Friends of Chamber Music. Recent seasons have featured works by pupils and admirers of Haydn, late quartets of Schubert and Beethoven, and novel explorations of early Bartók and Schoenberg. January 2014 saw the world premiere of Esterházy, book II, written for the ensemble by noted New York composer Paul Brantley. NEQ's 2014 summer project was the complete Mozart "Haydn" Quartets, performed at Berkeley's historic Hillside Club in a three-concert Amadè-Athon. The coming season will include an appearance on Pittsburgh's prestigious "Renaissance and Baroque" series in January and a summer cycle of the late Beethoven quartets. Four Haydn recordings are currently available, and a world premiere recording of a mid-19th century string quartet by Hungarian composer Imre Székely is near release.

The members of NEQ are internationally-known period-instrument and chamber music specialists: Kati Kyme and Lisa Weiss, violins, violist Anthony Martin, and cellist William Skeen. As individuals, the players have performed and recorded in the top echelon of early music ensembles worldwide. In addition to many years of musical collaboration in Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, American Bach Soloists, and a long list of renowned chamber ensembles, these four Bay Area musicians have enjoyed decades of friendship and shared experience. Their history as both colleagues and friends endows the quartet with an unusual commonality of musical language and gesture, and provides a strong foundation for a unique and original ensemble voice. In addition to concert appearances, NEQ enjoys performing in private homes and other intimate settings where the traditional experience of true chamber music is renewed and shared by players and listeners together.





The Jazzschool Studio Band
In Concert

Saturday 21 February 2015 at 8:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is delighted to present a large ensemble of young, talented jazz musicians in a concert of compositions by jazz greats. The Jazzschool Studio Band will fill our hall with wonderful, high-energy music. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

Band personnel:

Dave Eshelman, director

Saxophones:
Matt Richards, Dylan Sleeper, alto saxes
Evan Mickas, Solomon Alber, tenor saxes
Espen Scheurer, bari sax

Trombones:
Remee Ashley, Adam Miller, Cameron Daly, Derek Cross

Trumpets:
Jonah Moss, Alan Osmundson, Riley Cooke, Pete Cerdan

Rhythm Section:
Matt Wong, piano, Dillon Ingram, guitar, Max Schwartz, bass, Ben Ring, drums

About the program:

The Jazzschool Studio Band will be performing arrangements of standards by several jazz greats including Herbie Hancock, Wes Montgomery, Chuck Mangione, Shorty Rogers, Gerald Wilson, Chick Corea and Bob Florence. The band will also premier a composition by it's pianist Matt Wong.

The program will include Herbie Hancock's "Tell Me A Bedtime Story" arranged by Grammy Award winning arranger and local talent Doug Beavers; Ray Brown contributes three arrangements, one on Wes Montgomery's "The Thumb," one on Chick Corea's "Windows" and another on Chuck Mangione's beautiful ballad "She's Gone."

When asked by a journalist "Where is Jazz headed?" Stan Kenton wryly replied, "Tomorrow we're performing in Cleveland". Decades later, pianist Bob Florence wrote an exciting piece based on Kenton's theme "Artistry In Rhythm" and entitled it "Performing In Cleveland."

Shorty Rogers' arrangement of "Un Poco Loco" and Gerald Wilson's "Theme For Monterey" are also included.

A new composition by award winning pianist and Studio Band member Matt Wong rounds out the program. The composition is titled  "Against the Current" and is Matt's newest composition for big band.

About the band:

The Jazzschool Studio Band is made up of some of the best high school jazz musicians in the Bay Area. Led by legendary band leader, composer, and arranger Dave Eshelman, the band sounds mature beyond their young ages. Expect incredible arrangements, fiery soloists, and music both exploratory and traditional. This group came in 2nd place last year at the Monterey Jazz Festival's Next Generation Festival and has a number of students who are in this year's Grammy band, which selects students from throughout the entire country. They are raising money to go on a European tour this summer. If you want to see the future of jazz, this is the place to see it!




     John Wiitala    Mike Zilber   Erik Jekabson   Mads Tolling   Charith Premawardhana   Smith Dobson            Adam Shulman

Erik Jekabson String-tet
featuring Adam Shulman
play the music of Duke Ellington


Friday 23 January 2015 at 8:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is excited  to welcome back an old friend with a new project. Jazz trumpet master Erik Jekabson and his String-tet will be teaming up with virtuoso jazz pianist Adam
Shulman in a concert featuring the music of jazz legend, Duke Ellington. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.


The Artists:

Erik Jekabson - trumpet
Anthony Blea - violin *
Charith Premawardhana - viola
Michael Zilber - saxophones
Dillon Vado - vibraphone
John Wiitala - bass
Smith Dobson - drums
and featuring
Adam Shulman - piano

*replacing Mads Tolling

The Program: 

Erik Jekabson's  chamber jazz ensemble, featuring Anthony Blea on violin, Charith Premawardhana on viola, Michael Zilber on saxophones, Dillon Vado on vibes, John Wiitala on bass and Smith Dobson on drums, plays his arrangements of Duke Ellington's music, featuring the fantastic pianist Adam Shulman. The music is re-arranged for this chamber ensemble, which features plenty of improvisation from these seasoned performers.






Thomas Pandolfi
In Recital

Friday 9 January 2015 at 8:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is delighted to welcome the brilliant pianist, Thomas Pandolfi, back to our stage. Since his first appearance in our Concert Series  2008, Pandolfi has been impressing our audiences with the
intensity, technical brilliance and clarity of his playing,  This recital will feature a wide ranging program of classical gems and modern masterpieces. Don't miss this remarkable artist performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.

The Program: 


Sonata in F Major, K. 332 - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Clair de Lune from Suite Bergamasque - Claude Debussy
Trois mouvements perpetuels - Francis Poulenc
Le tombeau de Couperin - Maurice Ravel ( selections)
Préludes, Bk. 1 - C. Debussy (selections)
Pippermint-Get : Valse brillante de concert, in Eb, Op. 18 - Marie-Joseph-Alexandre Déodat de Séverac
Three Preludes - George Gershwin
Hamlisch Fantasy -Virtuoso Fantasy on Marvin Hamlisch's most beloved melodies - Thomas Pandolfi

The Aritst:

The young American pianist Thomas Pandolfi is an exciting virtuoso who, with each passing season, is becoming more and more sought after by audiences worldwide, and showered with superlatives by critics for his passionate artistry and amazing technique. His orchestral appearances often feature not only the beloved masterpiece concerti by Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov and Liszt, but also the equally brilliant ones by Paderewski, Rubinstein and Moszkowski. Additionally in the "Pops" genre, Thomas is considered a leading interpreter of the works of George Gershwin.

While the 2008-09 season marked Thomas' debut recitals in Canada, Germany and China, the 2009-10 season highlighted his debut in London, as well as return engagements throughout Eastern Europe, and concerts both as recitalist and soloist with orchestras across the United States. Pandolfi released his 6th CD album during the 2010-11 season, and returned to China in August of 2011 for his second tour of that country. Additionally, he made his recital debut in Toronto during the 2011-12 season, as well as stepped in on 48 hour notice to perform the Rachmaninov Second Piano Concerto for The Alexandria Symphony's closing concert of that season. During the last two seasons, he performed highly successful and acclaimed 15 state recital tours across the United States.

Audiences during 2014-15 will enjoy his artistry in an expanded 21 state recital tour to include the states of New York, Maryland, Virginia, Massachusetts, Indiana, Connecticut, New Jersey, Georgia, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Florida, Washington, DC, Ohio, South Carolina, North Carolina, California, Kansas, Arizona, New Mexico, Kentucky and New Hampshire. Thomas will also be making his debut with the Lafayette Symphony and Nicholas Palmer in The James Bond Concerto and Warsaw Concerto, and his debut with The McLean Orchestra in Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto No. 2 under Miriam Burns on their Gala Opening Night. He will also return as guest soloist with The Washington Metropolitan Philharmonic and Ulysses James in Brahms' First Piano Concerto, and The Owensboro Symphony under Nicholas Palmer in The James Bond Piano Concerto and Warsaw Concerto. Following a violin concerto for Midori, and a saxophone concerto for Brandford Marsalis, film and concert composers Kim Allen Kluge and Kathryn Vassar Kluge are now composing a piano concerto for Thomas, who is most honored and very excited to be involved in this thrilling project.

A graduate of The Juilliard School, Pandolfi earned both his Bachelor's and Master's degrees as a scholarship student. He is the father of two beautiful children, and resides in Washington, DC.




New Esterházy Quartet
A Flight of Fugues


Friday 2 January 2015 at 8:00pm

The Berkeley Hillside Club is pleased  to have our friends,  the New Esterházy Quartet, ring in the New Year for our concert series. The artists of this celebrated San Francisco Bay Area string ensemble are internationally-known period-instrument and chamber music specialists and have gained a well-deserved reputation for virtuoso playing and interesting programs. This concert will showcase the
contrapuntal complexity of Purcell, Bach, Mozart, Haydn, and Beethoven, featuring Mozart’s Adagio & Fugue and Beethoven's Grosse Fuge. Don't miss these remarkable artists performing in our historic and acoustically-excellent hall.


The Artists:

Kati Kyme
& Lisa Weiss - violins
Anthony Martin - viola
William Skeen - 'cello


The Program: 

Fantazia XI - Henry Purcell
Phantasia supra Ut, re, me, fa, sol, la - Johann Jacob Froberger
      arranged by Mozart
Fugue in C minor, from the Well Tempered Clavier, Book 2 - Johann Sebastian Bach
      arranged by Mozart, K. 405
Adagio & Fugue, K. 546 - Wolfgang Mozart
Cavatina & Grosse Fuge, Opp. 130 & 133 - Ludwig van Beethoven
Grave & Allegro from The Prodigal Son - Gregor Joseph Werner
      arranged by Haydn
Divertimento in C, Op. 20, No. 2 - Joseph Haydn


The Ensemble:

Founded in 2006 and currently in its eighth year of subscription concerts in San Francisco, Berkeley and Palo Alto, the New Esterházy Quartet continues to present masterworks of the classical period alongside intriguing works from less-familiar composers. With Haydn's 68 quartets as its core repertoire, NEQ is increasingly recognized as one of the world's top period-instrument string quartets. The ensemble has been presented by the San Francisco Early Music Society, Arizona Early Music Society, Carmel Chamber Music Society, has performed in New York and Los Angeles, and appeared as a Main Stage event for the 2012 Berkeley Festival & Exhibition. NEQ was also selected for Early Music America's Touring Artists Roster and has received two grants from the San Francisco Friends of Chamber Music. Recent seasons have featured works by pupils and admirers of Haydn, late quartets of Schubert and Beethoven, and novel explorations of early Bartók and Schoenberg. January 2014 saw the world premiere of Esterházy, book II, written for the ensemble by noted New York composer Paul Brantley. NEQ's 2014 summer project was the complete Mozart "Haydn" Quartets, performed at Berkeley's historic Hillside Club in a three-concert Amadè-Athon. The coming season will include an appearance on Pittsburgh's prestigious "Renaissance and Baroque" series in January and a summer cycle of the late Beethoven quartets. Four Haydn recordings are currently available, and a world premiere recording of a mid-19th century string quartet by Hungarian composer Imre Székely is near release.

The members of NEQ are internationally-known period-instrument and chamber music specialists: Kati Kyme and Lisa Weiss, violins, violist Anthony Martin, and cellist William Skeen. As individuals, the players have performed and recorded in the top echelon of early music ensembles worldwide. In addition to many years of musical collaboration in Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, American Bach Soloists, and a long list of renowned chamber ensembles, these four Bay Area musicians have enjoyed decades of friendship and shared experience. Their history as both colleagues and friends endows the quartet with an unusual commonality of musical language and gesture, and provides a strong foundation for a unique and original ensemble voice. In addition to concert appearances, NEQ enjoys performing in private homes and other intimate settings where the traditional experience of true chamber music is renewed and shared by players and listeners together.


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