DATING VIOLENCE

For help contact
National Teen Dating Abuse Hotline Number - Just for teens. You can talk one-on-one with a trained advocate 24/7 who can offer support and connect you to resources.
1-866-331-9474
1-866-331-8453 (TTY)
www.loveisrespect.org 


Dating violence is a type of intimate partner violence. It occurs between two people in a close relationship. The nature of dating violence can be physical, emotional, or sexual.
• Physical—This occurs when a partner is pinched, hit, shoved, slapped, punched, or kicked.
• Psychological/Emotional—This means threatening a partner or harming his or her sense of self-worth. Examples include name calling, 
     shaming, bullying,embarrassing on purpose, or keeping him/her away from friends and family.
• Sexual—This is forcing a partner to engage in a sex act when he or she does not or cannot consent. This can be physical or nonphysical, like          threatening to spread rumors if a partner refuses to have sex.
• Stalking—This refers to a pattern of harassing or threatening tactics that are unwanted and cause fearin the victim.

Dating violence can take place in person or electronically, such as repeated texting or posting sexual pictures of a partner online. 

Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime. Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and namecalling, are a “normal” part of a relationship. However, these behaviors can become abusive and develop into more serious forms of violence. Dating violence is a widespread issue that had serious long-term and short-term effects. Many teens do not report it because they are afraid to tell friends and family.
  • Among adult victims of rape, physical violence, and/ or stalking by an intimate partner, 
  • 22% of women and 15% of men first experienced some form of partner  violence between 11 and 17 years of age.1 6
Factors that increase risk for harming a dating partner include:
• Belief that dating violence is acceptable
• Depression, anxiety, and other trauma symptoms
• Aggression towards peers and other aggressive behavior
• Substance use
• Early sexual activity and having multiple sexual partners
• Having a friend involved in dating violence
• Conflict with partner
• Witnessing or experiencing violence in the home
• Approximately 9% of high school students report being hit, slapped, or physically hurt on purpose by a boyfriend or girlfriend in the 12 months before surveyed.

Dating violence can have a negative effect on health throughout life. Youth who are victims are more likely to experience symptoms of depression and anxiety, engage in unhealthy behaviors, like using tobacco, drugs, and alcohol, or exhibit antisocial behaviors and think about suicide.Youth who are victims of dating violence in high school are at higher risk for victimization during college.

Factors that increase risk for harming a dating partner include:
• Belief that dating violence is acceptable
• Depression, anxiety, and other trauma symptoms
• Aggression towards peers and other aggressive behavior
• Substance use
• Early sexual activity and having multiple sexual partners
• Having a friend involved in dating violence
• Conflict with partner
• Witnessing or experiencing violence in the home



WEB RESOURCES ON DATING VIOLENCE








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