AP Testing (Advanced Placement) 2019

2019 Exam Dates

  • Environmental Science - 12 noon, Monday, May 6, 2019
  • English Literature and Composition - 8am, Wednesday, May 8th, 2019
  • European History - 12 noon, Wednesday, May 8th, 2019
  • Psychology - 12 noon, Thursday, May 9, 2019
  • United States History - 8am, Friday, May 10th, 2019
  • Computer Science Principles - 12 noon, Friday, May 10th, 2019
  • Calculus AB - 8am, Tuesday, May 14th, 2019
Follow the links for the courses below to learn more about each course and the exams.

AP Calculus AB - Tom Maloney

Course Overview

  • AP Calculus AB is roughly equivalent to a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. The AP course covers topics in these areas, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.

Exam Overview - Tuesday, May 14, 2019

  • The AP Calculus AB Exam measures students' understanding of the concepts of calculus, their ability to apply these concepts, and their ability to make connections among graphical, numerical, analytical, and verbal representations of mathematics.
  • Students need strong foundations in algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and elementary functions to be prepared for the exam, though the course focuses on differential and integral calculus.
  • Encourage your students to visit the AP Calculus AB student page for exam information and exam practice.

AP Computer Science Principles - Ted Buck

Course Overview

  • AP Computer Science Principles offers a multidisciplinary approach to teaching the underlying principles of computation. The course will introduce students to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, the Internet, cybersecurity concerns, and computing impacts. AP Computer Science Principles also gives students the opportunity to use current technologies to create computational artifacts for both self-expression and problem solving. Together, these aspects of the course make up a rigorous and rich curriculum that aims to broaden participation in computer science.

    Computer Science Principles

Assessment Overview - Tasks Tuesday, April 30th, 2019;  Exam Friday May 10th

  • The AP Computer Science Principles Assessment consists of two parts: performance tasks and the end-of-course AP Exam. Both measure student achievement of the course learning objectives.
    • Two Performance Tasks | 40% of Overall AP Score
      • The Create performance task focuses specifically on the creation of a computer program through the collaborative and iterative process of programming. Applications from Ideas | 24% | 12 hours
      • The Explore performance task requires students to identify a computing innovation, explore its impact, and create a related digital artifact – ex. digital art, video – accompanied by a written response. Impact of Computing Innovations | 16% | 8 hours
    • End-of-Course Exam: 74 Questions | 2 Hours | 60% of Overall AP Score


AP English Literature and Composition - Ted Anderson

Course Overview

  • The AP English Literature and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work's structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works.

Exam Overview - Wednesday, May 8th, 2019

  • The AP English Literature and Composition Exam uses multiple-choice questions and free-response prompts to test students' skills in literary analysis of prose and verse texts.
  • The multiple choice section tests critical reading skills. Students read several passages and answer questions about the content, form, and style of each.
  • The free-response section tests students' ability to analyze and interpret literary texts by composing clear and effective essays.
  • Encourage your students to visit the AP English Literature and Composition student page for exam information and exam practice.

AP Environmental Science - Brian Scott

Course Overview

  • The AP Environmental Science course is the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college course in environmental science, through which students engage with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world. The course requires that students identify and analyze natural and human-made environmental problems, evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary, embracing topics from geology, biology, environmental studies, environmental science, chemistry, and geography.

Exam Overview - Monday, May 6, 2019

  • AP Environmental Science is interdisciplinary, embracing topics from geology, biology, environmental studies, environmental science, chemistry, and geography. Exam questions are based on each major topic area outlined in the course description. They are designed to cover the breadth of students' knowledge and depth of understanding of environmental science. Thought-provoking problems and questions based on fundamental ideas from environmental science are included along with questions based on the recall of basic facts and major concepts.
  • Encourage your students to visit the AP Environmental Science student page for exam information and exam practice.

AP European History - Carol Furchert

Course Overview

  • AP European History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university European history course. In AP European History students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in four historical periods from approximately 1450 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing historical evidence; contextualization; comparison; causation; change and continuity over time; and argument development. The course also provides six themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: interaction of Europe and the world; poverty and prosperity; objective knowledge and subjective visions; states and other institutions of power; individual and society; and national and European identity.

Exam Overview - Wednesday, May 8, 2019

  • The AP European History Exam measures students' knowledge of European history and their ability to think historically. Questions are based on key and supporting concepts, course themes, and the disciplinary practices and reasoning skills outlined in the course and exam description.
  • Encourage your students to visit the AP European History student page for exam information and exam practice.

AP Psychology - Carol Furchert

Course Overview

  • This course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, analyze bias, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas.

Exam Overview

  • The AP Psychology Exam measures students' knowledge of the 14 key topics and fields of study in psychology and tests their ability to define, compare, and apply concepts and research findings. Questions are based on key terminology, scientific methodology, and theories associated with each subfield.
  • Free-response questions may require students to interrelate different content areas and to analyze and evaluate psychological constructs and, more generally, theoretical perspectives.
  • A note about the DSM and the AP Psychology Exam: All terminology, criteria, and classifications referred to in multiple-choice and free-response questions adhere to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5).
  • Encourage your students to visit the AP Psychology student page for exam information and exam practice.

AP United States History - Ben Peters

Course Overview

  • AP U.S. History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university U.S. history course. In AP U.S. History students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods from approximately 1491 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; making historical comparisons; utilizing reasoning about contextualization, causation, and continuity and change over time; and developing historical arguments. The course also provides seven themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: American and national identity; migration and settlement; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America in the world; geography and the environment; and culture and society.

Exam Overview - Friday, May 10, 2019

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