Research Paper

Beans the natural sponge?

How much water do dehydrated beans absorb?  That is the question to our topic. Browsing the web for a science fair topic, I came upon this topic and from their decided to do this topic.  To apply this topic to a real life situation, when you’re heating up soup, you sometimes have dehydrated beans within it.  After you add water and heat the soup up your beans have hydrated.  Therefore, it relates back to our topic of how much water do dehydrated beans absorb.

            In this experiment, the important background information to know about are: rehydration, viable, absorb, and control.  Rehydration is to restore moisture to something that is dehydrated. Rehydration will take place in the experiment when the bean has sucked water into itself until it is hydrated.  Viable is something capable of living.  Viable will take place in the experiment when the bean is done absorbing the water and is fully hydrated to its normal self.  Absorb which is to suck up or drink in. Absorption is probably the key component to this experiment because absorption is the amount intake the dehydrated bean had taken in.  And control is to exercise restraint or direction over dominate or command. Control will take place within the experiment when determining how much water is absorbed by the beans or with the controlled variables.

            The experiments that are related to this experiment includes: “What advantage does a plant whose seeds can survive for years in a dry environment have? And in nature, what role is played by the proteins and carbohydrates in a bean?” Within these experiments, these experiments hold information that relates to our experiment topic. Information such as: the amount of fluid a seed/bean can hold within its shape and form and how does the seed/bean hold the fluid within its self and distribute the fluid evenly throughout time.

            In this experiment, we want to explore the amount of water a bean can sustain and how long it takes to absorb water.  The variables that are in this experiment are the amount of time taken to absorb the water and how much water is being absorbed.  There are further variables that could be explored such as temperature, different types of beans and the rate they absorbs liquids.  Since we have a miniscule amount of time, we are only taking the data of the amount of time it takes to absorb water and how much water is being absorbed.  

            While making chili my parents needed to rehydrate beans and we wanted to use this as our experiment to see how much water a dehydrated bean can absorb in certain amount of times. The main information we needed to know about dehydrated beans were: rehydration, viable, absorb, and control. Rehydration is the process of something dehydrated regaining its moisture. This took place in the experiment when the beans took in the water and restored itself back to a hydrated bean. Viable is something capable of living. At the end of the experiments when the beans are fully hydrated, the beans would start to sprout and start to grow. Absorb is to suck up or drink in. This was the focus point of our experiment. We needed to measure how much water the beans would soak up. Lastly, control is to exercise restraint or direction over dominate or command. The controls in our experiment were water and time.

            The problem question of our experiment was “How much water is absorbed by the different type of dried beans in a given amount of time?” Our hypothesis was If different types of beans are soaked in water for a period of time then, each type of bean will have different amounts of water that was absorbed because, each type of bean has a different size and water capacity.

            The materials were:

 30 Plastic Cups, 1 Permanent Marker, 5 Different Dried Beans, 1 Measuring Cup,  Water, Your, Data Table,  1 Strainer.

            The procedures were:

 1) Label a set of six plastic cups with the permanent marker:

                -Cup #1: Zero

                -Cup #2: 20 minutes 

                -Cup #3: 1 hour

                -Cup #4: 3 hours

                -Cup #5: 9 hours

                -Cup #6: 27 hours

      2) Add 4.0 oz of water to cups 2-6

      3) Record the time you poured the water into the cups

      4) After each amount of time, pour the beans of the cup into a strainer above the measuring cup

      5) Shake the beans in the strainer as much as you can to get the access water off of the beans

      6) Record the amount of water absorbed from the beans (4.0 oz - the amount of water left in the measuring cup after straining the beans)

      7) Repeat steps 4-6 for cups 2-6

            Our hypothesis was supported by the outcome of the experiment. The bigger the bean, the more water it could absorb and the smaller the bean, the lesser amount of water it could absorb. This answers our problem question because different beans absorbed different amounts of water. This experiment could lead to another one that answers which bean in particular is the most absorbent.

Introduction

 Beans come in various sizes, shapes and colors and have been used in cooking for a long period of time now. Beans are a good source of protein; low in fat, and contains carbohydrates and fiber. To add to their nutritious qualities, they are very convenient because they can be dried out and be stored for years. Soaking beans in water for a few hours soften the dried beans and prepares them for cooking. This is the process of rehydration which also occurs in nature. Beans are a type of seed and when introduced to water, the bean can sprout and grow as a plant. 

    As the beans are soaking in water, their volume and mass increases because of the absorption of water. In this experiment, we are determining the amount of water different type of beans absorbed in a given time. 

Problem Question

How much water is absorbed by the different type of dried beans in a given amount of time?

Hypothesis

If different types of beans are soaked in water for a period of time then, each type of bean will have different amounts of water that was absorbed because, each type of bean has a different size and water capacity.

Materials

    1.      30 Plastic cups

    2.      1 Permanent marker

    3.      5 Different dried beans

    4.      1 Measuring cup

    5.      Water

    6.      Your data table

7.      1 Strainer

Procedures

 1) Label a set of six plastic cups with the permanent marker:

                -Cup #1: Zero

                -Cup #2: 20 minutes 

                -Cup #3: 1 hour

                -Cup #4: 3 hours

                -Cup #5: 9 hours

                -Cup #6: 27 hours

      2) Add 4.0 oz of water to cups 2-6

      3) Record the time you poured the water into the cups

      4) After each amount of time, pour the beans of the cup into a stainer above the measuring cup

      5) Shake the beans in the strainer as much as you can to get the access water off of the beans

      6) Record the amount of water absorbed from the beans (4.0 oz - the amount of water left in the measuring cup after straining the beans)

      7) Repeat steps 4-6 for cups 2-6

 

 

 

 

Data table:

 

Zero

20 minute

1 hour

3 hours

9 hours

27 hours

Small Red beans

-No water added.

-Preference.

-Turned water red

-Absorbed .3 oz of water

-Beans expanded

-Absorbed 0.5 oz of water

-Beans were well expanded

-Beans absorbed 2 oz of water

-Beans lost most of their color

-Doubled their original size

-Absorbed 2.5 oz of water

-Beans germinated

-Absorbed 2.5 oz (stayed the same)

Pinto Beans

-No water added.

-Preference

-Beans expanded a little bit

-Absorbed 0.2 oz of water

-Beans expanded more

-Absorbed 0.4 oz of water

-Beans expanded

-Absorbed 1.5 oz of water

-Beans expanded

-Absorbed 2.5 oz of water

-Beans destroyed cup

-Beans germinated

-Absorbed 3.75 oz of water

Lima Beans

 

-No water

-Preference

-Skin started to peel off

-Absorbed 0.5 oz of water

-Beans begin to split

-Absorbed 1.0 oz of water

-Beans split

-Expanded a lot

-Germinated

-Absorbed 2.0 oz of water

-Sprouts are growing

-Expanded

-Absorbed 3.0 oz of water

-Sprouted

-Expanded more

-Absorbed 3.5 oz of water

Azuki Beans

 

-No water

-Preference

-No difference from start

-No water was absorbed

-Still no absorption

-Beans were still hard

-Absorbed 0.25 oz of water

-Turned water yellow ish

-Beans expanded

-Water turned red

-Absorbed 1.75 oz of water

-Didn’t germinate

-Water was red

-Absorbed 2.0 oz of water

Mung Beans

 

-No water

-Preference

-No difference from start

-No water was absorbed

-Still no absorption

-Beans were still hard

-No absorption

-Water was yellow

-Beans expanded

-Turned water yellow

-Absorbed 1.75 oz of water

-Almost all the beans had germinated

-Water was yellow

-Absorbed 2.5 oz of water


Conclusion

In conclusion, our hypothesis was correct because each type of bean had a different water capacity. The original problem, "how much water is absorbed by different type of beans in a given amount of time?" can relate to the information that was gathered by this experiment. Our problem question helped us come to the conclusion that the bigger beans had absorbed a larger amount of water compared to the small beans. When the beans began to absorb the water, it became soft and within a few hours the beans started germinating. 

   During this experiment, we had to improvise some of the procedures due to the lack of materials we had. The original experiment had included a scale but because we did not have a scale we used a strainer and measuring cup. Due to this, our data probably is not accurate as it should be. Another problem we faced in this experiment was checking the beans at the specific time. We would check the beans an hour late because of our schedule. 

    For a future experiment, we could find out what type of bean absorbs the most water. 

ć
clontayao@hanalani.org,
Dec 10, 2011, 2:01 AM
ĉ
knakagawa@hanalani.org,
Dec 10, 2011, 1:15 AM