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Hyderabad rare photos Gallery

Nizams Jewellery

posted Nov 14, 2008, 2:02 AM by Haranath Kadaveru

 
The Collection was for the first time presented to the people of India in 2001 at New Delhi. In the same year it was brought to this city. This stunning jewellery exhibition attracted over 2.35 lakh visitors to the Salar Jung Museum from 24 November, 2001 till 30 June 2002. The grand success of the last exhibition and with the encouragement of The Ministry of Culture, this priceless heritage of the nation has second exhibition presented to the people of Hyderabad by the Salar Jung Museum from 1st January 2006 to 16th March 2007.

The exhibition was presented with new insights into the history of the Nizams’ Jewellery. The interiors have been divided into three spaces- the lobby area, the Introductory Gallery with rare photographs from the Chowmahalla Palace Collection and the main vault where the jewels have been displayed under high security. The jewellery is displayed in twenty-nine showcases.

The main gallery displays jewellery spread over twenty-nine showcases including the framed 184.50 carat Imperial Diamond, the twenty two priceless uncut Columbian emeralds believed to have been part of the Roman treasury, magnificent Basra pearls and the rare alexandrite ring.

Among the many jewellery pieces dating from the early eighteenth century to the twenty century on display in the Nizams jewellery exhibition, a few of the highlights are:’•

  • The famed 184.50 carat Imperial (Jacob) diamond.
  • The twenty two priceless uncut Colombian emeralds
  • The rare carat alexandrite ring.
  • A Kanthi (necklace) with approximately 12 flat diamonds totaling an astonishing 250 carats from the Golconda mines
Taveez Dand Zamarrud Wa Kanval Almas, step cut emerald bazubands or armbands weighing 100 and 150 carats once thought to have belonged to Tipu Sultan, the ruler of Mysore.
 
Some of Most stunning pieces.
 
 

Warangal

posted Nov 12, 2008, 11:13 PM by Haranath Kadaveru   [ updated Nov 12, 2008, 11:24 PM ]

 

Photograph of a gateway at Warangal in Andhra Pradesh, taken by Hooper, Willoughby Wallace Hooper in c.1870, from the Lee-Warner Collection: 'Bombay Presidency. William Lee Warner C.S.'

Warangal was the capital of the Kakatiya rulers in the 12th-13th centuries and together with Hanamkonda nearby, they were important political and artistic centres of the eastern Deccan. The circular city Warangal was founded in the 12th century by the Kakatiya ruler Ganapatideva and was occupied by the Muslims in later times. There are two concentric circles of fortifications. The outer circuit is an earthern rampart entered through four arched gateways. The inner circuit is of granite and has four gateways in the centre of each side. This view shows a massive trabeate temple gateway standing in a field.


 

Photograph of the gateway and temple ruins at Warangal in Andhra Pradesh, from the Lee-Warner Collection: 'Bombay Presidency. William Lee Warner C.S.', taken by an unkown photographer in the 1870s. Warangal was the capital of the Kakatiya rulers in the 12th-13th centuries and together with Hanamkonda nearby, they were important political and artistic centres of the eastern Deccan. The circular city of Warangal was founded in the 12th century by the Kakatiya ruler Ganapatideva and was occupied by the Muslims in later times. There are two concentric circles of fortifications. The outer circuit is an earthern rampart entered through four arched gateways. The inner circuit is of stone and has four gateways. In the centre of the city there is a ruined temple dedicated to Shiva Svayambhu and another smaller one also dedicated to Shiva which dates from 14th century.


 

Photograph of the southern gateway in the Fort of Warangal, taken by Deen Dayal in the 1880s, part of the Curzon Collection: 'Views of HH the Nizam's Dominions, Hyderabad, Deccan, 1892'. Warangal was the capital of the Kakatiya rulers in

the 12th-13th centuries and was one of the important political and artistic centres of the eastern Deccan. The circular city Warangal was founded in the 12th century by the Kakatiya ruler Ganapatideva. After a number of attempts the Bahmani rulers eventually took the fort city, and in 1543 the state was absorbed by the Qutb Shahi dynasty of Golconda. The fort consists of two concentric circles of fortifications. The outer wall is an earth rampart entered through four arched gateways and the inner wall is built of granite and has four gateways in the centre of each side. The gateway in this view has a flat lintel and Hindu pilasters carrying a moulded cornice with sinuous brackets.


 

One of the gates of Warangal Fort, a photogravure by Alfred Nawrath, 1938


 

Photograph of the Thousand Pillared Temple, at Hanumkonda in Andhra Pradesh, taken by Deen Dayal in the 1880s. This is from the Curzon Collection: 'Views of HH the Nizam's Dominions, Hyderabad, Deccan, 1892'. Hanamkonda or Hanumakonda, near Warangal, was one of the capitals of the Kakatiya rulers in the 12th-13th centuries. The two cities were important political and artistic centres of the eastern Deccan. The Shiva temple seen in this view was built by king Rudradeva in 1163 and takes its name from another ruined mandapa with numerous columns of granite. It consists of three shrines dedicated to Shiva, Vishnu and Surya that are preceded by a columned mandapa or hall with a porch. The outer wall have moulded basements and wall niches, which have now lost their sculptures, covered by miniature temple towers. The shrines have lost their superstructures. The mandapa has sharply cut columns with multi-faceted shafts. This view shows the sculpture of Nandi, the bull mount of Shiva, that was once placed in front of the temple.


 

Hyderabad

posted Nov 11, 2008, 8:50 PM by Haranath Kadaveru   [ updated Nov 11, 2008, 9:35 PM ]

 
 
Photograph of the entrance bridge to the city of Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, from the Curzon Collection: 'Views of HH the Nizam's Dominions, Hyderabad, Deccan, 1892'. This view was taken by Lala Deen Dayal (1844-1905) in the 1880s. Dayal took up photography in the 1870s and in 1884 became official photographer to the Nizam of Hyderabad, with studios in Secunderabad and Indore. Hyderabad was founded beside the River Musi in 1591 by Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah (r.1580-1612) as an alternative to his capital at Golconda. Later, Hyderabad became the capital of the Nizams of Hyderabad, who ruled over one of the largest states in India from 1724 to 1948. The dynasty was founded by Nizam al-Mulk, entitled Asaf Jah (d. 1748) who had arrived in the Deccan as the Mughal governor before declaring his independence. During their time in power the Nizams constructed many buildings of architectural importance.

 

Charminar

posted Nov 11, 2008, 8:42 PM by Haranath Kadaveru   [ updated Dec 2, 2008, 1:19 AM ]

 
Photograph of a street in Hyderabad looking towards the Char Minar, taken by Deen Dayal in the 1880s. This is from the Curzon Collection: 'Views of HH the Nizam's Dominions, Hyderabad, Deccan, 1892'. Hyderabad was founded beside the River Musi in 1591 by Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah (r.1580-1612) as an alternative to his capital at Golconda. The town was laid out in a grid pattern with two main roads running east to west and north to south; the Char Minar, or Four Towers, sits at the intersection of these two roads. This ceremonial strucuture was built in 1591 to mark the centre of the city. It comprises four imposing arched portals with arcaded storeys and geometric screens above. The four corner minarets, crowned with domical finials, contain spiral staircases opening onto triple tiers of balconies. The Mecca mosque, begun in 1617, can be seen to the right of this image.
 

 
"The Char Minar, Hyderabad," an engraving from Fullarton's Gazetteer, London, 1850; CLICK ON THE IMAGE FOR A VERY LARGE SCAN from my own collection
 

 
The Char Minar gate, Hyderabad, in the 1880's; an albumen photo, possibly by Lala Deen Dayal

 charminar
 
Old Photo

Photograph of a main street in Hyderabad, looking towards the Char Minar, taken by Deen Dayal in the 1880s. This is from the Curzon Collection: 'Views of HH the Nizam's Dominions, Hyderabad, Deccan, 1892'. Hyderabad was founded beside the River Musi in 1591 by Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah (r.1580-1612) as an alternative to his capital at Golconda. The town was laid out in a grid pattern with two main roads running east to west and north to south; the Char Minar sits at the intersection of these two roads. The Char Minar, or Four Towers, was built in 1591 to mark the centre of the city. This ceremonial structure comprises four imposing arched portals with arcaded storeys and geometric screens above. The four corner minarets are crowned with domical finials. They contain spiral staircases opening onto triple tiers of balconies.


 

Stereographic photograph of Hyderabad in Andhra Pradesh, taken by James Ricalton in c. 1903, from The Underwood Travel Library: Stereoscopic Views of India. Hyderabad was founded beside the River Musi in 1591 by Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah (r.1580-1612) as an alternative to his capital at Golconda. The town was laid out in a grid pattern with two main roads running east to west and north to south; the Char Minar sits at the intersection of these two roads. The Char Minar, or Four Towers, seen in the background of this view, was built in 1591 to mark the centre of the city. This ceremonial structure comprises four imposing arched portals with arcaded storeys and geometric screens above. The four corner minarets are crowned with domical finials. They contain spiral staircases opening onto triple tiers of balconies. This image is described by Ricalton in 'India Through the Stereoscope' (1907), "Two of the Nizam's state elephants have intruded athwart the street and obstructed our view...These two have just come out from the great archway on the left; they are being brought out in readiness to convey some traveler to Golconda." This is one of a series of 100 photographs, designed to be viewed through a special binocular viewer, producing a 3D effect, which were sold together with a book of descriptions and a map. Stereoscopic cameras, those with two lenses and the ability to take two photographs at the same time, were introduced in the mid 19th century.


 

Secunderabad

posted Oct 30, 2008, 10:15 PM by Haranath Kadaveru   [ updated Dec 2, 2008, 1:10 AM ]

 

Photograph of a street in Secunderabad, Andrea Pradeah, taken by Deen Dayal in the 1880s, from the Curzon Collection: 'Views of HH the Nizam's Dominions, Hyderabad, Deccan, 1892'. Secunderabad, twin city of Hyderabad, was founded after an alliance between Hyderabad’s Nizam Sikander Jah and the British East India Company in 1798. Following the treaty, secured by Major James Achilles Kirkpatrick, an area north of Hussain Sagar lake was made into a cantonment. Soon after the treaty was signed 5,000 British troops arrived and camped in the new cantonment of Secunderabad, which was laid out in 1806 and named after the Nizam. Initially it encompassed an area of four square miles and had a population of 5,000 troops plus several thousand civilians. However, 60 years later it had increased to 17 square miles and had a population, including the armed forces, of 50,000.


 

Photograph of mills at Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, Curzon Collection: 'Views of HH the Nizam's Dominions, Hyderabad, Deccan, 1892', taken by Deen Dayal in the 1880s. Hyderabad was founded beside the River Musi in 1591 by Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah (r.1580-1612) as an alternative to his capital at Golconda. Later, Hyderabad became the capital of the Nizams of Hyderabad, who ruled over one of the largest states in India. The dynasty was founded by Nizam al-Mulk, entitled Asaf Jah (d. 1748) who arrived in the Deccan as the Mughal governor. In 1724 Asaf Jah declared independence and established the dynasty of Nizams who ruled until 1948. There were no modern industries in Hyderabad before 1874 but a few years later railway workshops were established nearby and four factories sprang up south and east of the Hussain Sagar lake. These industrial units became the centre of new settlements. This is a view of the mills and the nearby canal.


Photograph showing the Scotch Kirk and cemetery, with the cantonment parade ground and race course beyond, at Secunderabad (now in Andhra Pradesh) taken by Lala Deen Dayal, c. 1890.

Secunderabad is situated in Andhra Pradesh next to Hyderabad, its older twin city (founded c. 1590). The Nizam of Hyderabad, Sikander Jah, entered into a subsidiary alliance with the British East India Company in 1798, involving military and political cooperation. Under the alliance an area north of Hussain Sagar lake was to be made a cantonment. Soon after the alliance was signed 5,000 British troops arrived and camped north of Hyderabad; the cantonment was laid out in 1806 and named after the Nizam, and thus was Secunderabad founded. Initially it encompassed an area of four square miles and had a population of 5,000 troops plus several thousand civilians, however 60 years later it had increased to 17 square miles and the population, including the armed forces was 50,000. The town continued to develop as its military functions and business opportunities drew large numbers of people from the surrounding rural areas.


View of the Husain Sagar lake to the north of Hyderabad, photographed by Deen Dayal in the 1880s. This is from the Curzon Collection: 'Views of HH the Nizam's Dominions, Hyderabad, Deccan, 1892'. Husain Sagar is an artificial lake which divides the twin cities of Secunderabad and Hyderabad in Andhra Pradesh. The lake was created in the 16th century by Ibrahim Quli Qutb Shah (r.1550-80) and named after Husain Shah Wali, who had helped the sultan recover from illness. It was created by enlarging an existing small stone dam across the valley. The lake supplied the townspeople with water as well as irrigating the surrounding land.

 

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