Global History and Geography is a two-year course that students take during their 9th and 10th grade years, which culminates in a Regents examination at the end of the 10th grade. Students will focus on five social studies standards (geography, world history, United States History, economics, and government), common themes that recur across time and place (e.g., change, diversity, and nationalism), and eight historical eras. The course is taught chronologically and focuses on exploring historical and cultural differences and similarities between different regions of the world during the same period. Students will develop essential social science skills that include getting, using, and presenting information; problem solving; and effective communication orally, visually, and in writing.
  • During 9th grade, students will gain an understanding of global history and geography from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to around 1750 C.E. (Course Units 1-17).
  • During 10th grade, students will gain an understanding of global history and geography from approximately 1750 C.E. to the present (Course Units 18-34).

Themes and Periods
Belief Systems, Change, Citizenship, Conflict, Culture and Intellectual Life. Decision Making, Diversity, Economic Systems, Environment and Society, Factors of Production, Human and Physical Geography, Human Rights, Imperialism, Interdependence, Justice, Movement of People and Goods, Nationalism, Nation State, Needs and Wants, Political Systems, Power, Scarcity, Science and Technology, and Urbanization
  1. The Global History and Geography Regents course is structured around themes and concepts in different chronological periods from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the present. 
  2. These key concepts organize and prioritize historical developments. 
  3. Themes allow students to make connections and identify patterns and trends over time. 

Timeline
  1. Year Zero does not exist in the "Anno Domini" or Common Era system usually used to number years in the Gregorian calendar and in its predecessor, the Julian calendar. Year 1 B.C.E. is followed by A.D. 1 in historical timelines. (B.C. = B.C.E.) (A.D. = C.E.) 
B.C. (Before Christ) is a period of time (epoch) used in dating years prior to the estimated conception of Jesus in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The dates will increase to the left of A.D. 1 on a timeline.
B.C.E. (Before Common Era) is a period of time (epoch) not associated with Christianity. It represents the same years as B.C. (Before Christ).

A.D. ("Anno Domini") is a period of time (epoch) used in dating years beginning with the estimated birth of Jesus in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The term "anno Domini" is Medieval Latin and means "in the year of the Lord". It does not mean "After Death." The dates will increase to the right of A.D. 1 on a timeline.
C.E. (Common Era) is a period of time (epoch) used not associated with Christianity. It represents the same years as A.D. ("Anno Domini").


Unit 1: Paleolithic Age (c. 2,000,000 – 10,000 B.C.E.) and the Neolithic Revolution (c. 10,000 – 3,200 B.C.E.) 
  1. Paleolithic Age and Neolithic Revolution 
  2. Characteristics of Civilization
Read Chapter 1 Sections 1-3 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Ancient World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 2: The Ancient World in the Middle East (c. 3500 – 450 B.C.E.)
  1. Civilization in Mesopotamia
  2. Egyptian Civilization: “The Gift of the Nile”
  3. The Hebrews: The “Children of Israel
  4. The Assyrian Empire
Read Chapter 1 Section 3, Chapter 2 Sections 1-2, Chapter 3 Sections 1 and 4, and Chapter 4 Section 1 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Ancient World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 3: Indian Civilizations (c. 3500 B.C.E. – 1631 C.E.)
  1. The Emergence of Civilization in India: Harappan Society
  2. The Arrival of the Aryans and the Emergence of the Mauryan Empire
  3. Caste and Class: Social Structures in Ancient India 
  4. Daily Life in Ancient India
  5. Hinduism
  6. Buddhism: The Middle Path
  7. India After the Mauryans and India Culture
  8. The Silk Road
  9. Gupta Empire and the Transformation of Buddhism
  10. Indian Ocean Trade
  11. Arrival of Islam in India
  12. Change Over Time: Era between the Mauryans and Mughals
  13. Early Southeast Asia and Angkor Wat
Read Chapter 2 Section 3, Chapter 3 Section 2, Chapter 7 Sections 1-2, and Chapter 18 Section 3 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Ancient World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 4: Chinese Dynasties (c. 1766 B.C.E. – 1912 C.E.)
  1. Shang and Zhou Dynasties
  2. Ancient Chinese Philosophies
  3. Qin Dynasty and the Great Wall
  4. Han Dynasty and the Silk Road
  5. Comparison of the Roman and Han Empires
  6. Daily Life in Ancient China
  7. Ancient Chinese Culture
  8. China After the Han Dynasty
  9. Han Dynasty and the Silk Road
  10. Comparison of the Roman and Han Empires
  11. Daily Life in Ancient China
  12. Song Dynasty and the Golden Age of China
  13. Chinese Maritime Indian Ocean Trade
  14. Society in Traditional China
  15. Ming Dynasty
  16. Buddhism, Daoism and Neo-Confucianism
  17. Golden Age of Chinese Culture
  18. From the Ming to the Qing
  19. Daily Life in Qing China
Read Chapter 2 Section 4, Chapter 4 Section 4, and Chapter 7 Section 3 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Ancient World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 5: Classical Greece and the Persian Empire (c. 800 B.C.E. – 600 C.E.)
  1. Polis and Greek Colonization
  2. The Greek City-States of Athens and Sparta
  3. The Persian Empire (550 – 330 B.C.E)
  4. Greco-Persian Wars and the Age of Pericles
  5. Peloponnesian War and Culture of Classical Greece
  6. Greek Philosophers and Daily Live in Classical Athens
  7. The Rise of Macedonia and the Conquests of Alexander
  8. Hellenistic Culture and Kingdoms
Read Chapter 5 Sections 1-5 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Ancient World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 6: Roman Empire and Early Christianity (c. 500 B.C.E. – 1453 C.E.) 
  1. Early Rome and the Republic
  2. Roman Conquest of the Mediterranean 
  3. Decline and Fall of the Roman Republic
  4. Age of Augustus and Pax Romana
  5. Early Roman Empire
  6. Culture and Society in the Roman World
  7. Fall of the Western Roman Empire
  8. Development of Christianity
  9. Comparison of the Roman and Han Empires
Read Chapter 6 Sections 1-5 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Ancient World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 7: Byzantine Empire and Early Russian History (c. 285 – 1453 C.E.)
  1. Reign of Justinian and Theodora
  2. Byzantine Civilization and Orthodox Christianity
  3. Slavic Peoples and the Development of Kievan Rus
Read Chapter 11 Section 1 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Ancient World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 8: Mongol Empire (c. 1206 – 1368 C.E.)
  1. Mongol Empire and Mongolian Khanates
  2. Pax Mongolica
  3. Yuan Dynasty in China
  4. Khanate of the Golden Horde in Kievan Rus
Read Chapter 11 Section 2 and Chapter 12 Section 2 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Ancient World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 9: Medieval Europe (c. 476 – 1453 C.E.)
  1. Germanic Kingdoms and the Role of the Christian Church
  2. Practice of Fief-Holding and the Manorial System
  3. Medieval European Civilization
  4. Growth of Trade and Medieval Cities
  5. England, France and the Holy Roman Empire
  6. Power Struggle Between The Christian Church and German Emperors
  7. Causes and Outcomes of the Crusades
  8. Black Death
  9. Hundred Years’ War and the Great Schism
Read Chapter 13 sections 1-4 and Chapter 14 Sections 1-4 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Ancient World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 10: Japanese Feudalism (c. 572 – 1637 C.E.)
  1. Medieval Japanese State and the Heian Period
  2. Daily Life in Medieval Japan
  3. Shinto and Traditional Japanese Culture
  4. Korea: “China’s Little Brother”
  5. Vietnam (Great Viet) and the Legacy of China
  6. Tokugawa Shogunate and Culture
  7. Tokugawa “Great Peace”
Read Chapter 12 Section 4 and Chapter 19 Section 3 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Ancient World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 11: Islamic Caliphates (c. 570 – 1450 C.E.)
  1. Rise of Islam 
  2. Arab Empire and the Umayyad and Abbasid Caliphates
  3. Seljuk Turks and Islamic Civilization
  4. Islamic Society and the Culture of Islam
  5. Sects of Islam 
  6. Golden Age of Islam
Read Chapter 10 Sections 1-3 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Ancient World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 12: African Trading Kingdoms (c. 600 – 1450 C.E.)
  1. Ancient Peoples in East Africa
  2. Spread of Islam in North and East Africa
  3. West African Trading Kingdoms
  4. Trans-Saharan Trade Route (Sand Road)
  5. States and Stateless Societies in Central and Southern Africa
  6. African Culture
Read Chapter 8 Sections 1-3 and Chapter 15 Sections 1-3 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Ancient World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 13: Renaissance (c. 1300 – 1600 C.E.)
  1. Italian Renaissance: “Rebirth” of Classical Art and Learning
  2. English Renaissance
Read Chapter 17 Sections 1-2 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Ancient World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 14: Protestant Reformation and the Catholic Counter-Reformation (c. 1517 – 1648 C.E.)
  1. Causes of the Protestant Reformation
  2. Martin Luther and the German Reformation
  3. Spread of the Protestant Reformation
  4. Tudor Dynasty
  5. Catholic Counter-Reformation
Read Chapter 17 Sections 3-4 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Ancient World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 15: Pre-Columbian Civilizations (c. 1800 B.C.E. – 1500 C.E.)
  1. Early Civilizations in Central America
  2. The Maya
  3. The Aztecs
  4. The Inka (Inca) and the first civilizations in South America
Read Chapter 16 Sections 2-4 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Ancient World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 16: Maritime Revolution and the Commercial Revolution (c.1400 – 1800 C.E.)
  1. Maritime Revolution and the Indian Ocean
  2. Portuguese Maritime Empire
  3. Spanish Conquests in the “New World”
  4. Impact of European Expansion during the Maritime Revolution
  5. Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade
  6. Southeast Asia in the Era of the Spice Trade
Read Chapter 19 Sections 1-2 and Chapter 20 Sections 1, 3 and 4 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Ancient World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 17: Absolutism and Constitutional Monarchy (c. 1500 – 1800 C.E.)
  1. Philip II of Spain and Militant Catholicism
  2. Mercantilism and the Thirty Years’ War
  3. Louis XIV of France and Peter the Great of Russia
  4. Limited Monarchy, English Civil War and the Glorious Revolution
  5. European Culture: Artistic and Literary Achievements in the 16th and 17th Centuries
  6. Suleiman the Lawgiver of the Ottoman Empire
  7. Ottoman Culture
  8. Safavid Dynasty
  9. Akbar the Great and the Mughal Dynasty
  10. Mughal Society and Culture
Read Chapter 18 Section 1 and 3, Chapter 20 Sections 3-4, and Chapter 21 Sections 1, 2, 4 and 5 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Ancient World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 18: Scientific Revolution (c. 1550 – 1700 C.E.)

Read Chapter 6 Section 1 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Modern World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 19: Enlightenment (c. 1650 – 1815 C.E.)

Read Chapter 6 Sections 2-3 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Modern World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 20: French Revolution and the Napoleonic Empire (1789 – 1815 C.E.)
  1. Causes of the French Revolution
  2. Reign of Terror
  3. Napoleonic Empire
  4. Congress of Vienna
Read Chapter 7 Sections 1-5 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Modern World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 21: Latin American Wars of Independence and Revolutions (1789 – 1934 C.E.)
  1. Nationalism in Latin America 
  2. Economic Imperialism in Latin America
  3. Mexican Revolution
Read Chapter 8 Section 1 and Chapter 12 Sections 3-4 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Modern World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 22: Italian and German Unification (1815 – 1871 C.E.)
  1. Unification Movements in Italy 
  2. Unification Movements in Germany
Read Chapter 8 Section 3 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Modern World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 23: British Industrial Revolution (c. 1750 – 1914 C.E.)
  1. Causes and Effects of the Industrial Revolution
  2. Spread of Industrialization
  3. Economic, Social and Political Reforms of Industrialization
  4. Democratic Reforms of Britain and France 
  5. Post-Industrialization and Progress
Read Chapter 9 Sections 1-5 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Modern World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 24: “New” Imperialism (c. 1850 – 1914 C.E.)
  1. Neo-Imperialism in Africa 
  2. Decline of the Ottoman Empire
  3. British Imperialism in India
  4. Imperialism in Southeast Asia
  5. Sphere of Influence in China
  6. Meiji Era
Read Chapter 11 Sections 1-4 and Chapter 12 Sections 1-2 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Modern World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 25: Great War (1914 – 1919 C.E.) 
  1. M.A.I.N. Causes of the Great War
  2. Eastern and Western Front
  3. Unrestricted Submarine Warfare and Total War
  4. Treaty of Versailles
Read Chapter 8 Section 3 and Chapter 13 Sections 1-4 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Modern World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 26: Russian Revolutions (1905 – 1922 C.E.)
  1. 18th and 19th Century Russia
  2. Causes and Effects of the Russian Revolutions of 1917
Read Chapter 8 Section 2 and Chapter 14 Section 1 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Modern World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 27: Stalinist Russia (1922 – 1953 C.E.)
  1. Totalitarianism
  2. Five-Year Plans
  3. Collectivization
  4. Holodomor and the Great Purge
Read Chapter 14 Section 2 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Modern World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 28: Italian Fascism and German Nazism (1919 – 1939 C.E.)
  1. Worldwide Depression
  2. Rise of Fascism in Italy
  3. Rise of Nazism in Germany
  4. Axis Powers and Imperialism
Read Chapter 15 Sections 2-3 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Modern World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 29: World War II (1939 – 1945 C.E.)
  1. M.A.I.N. Causes of World War II
  2. Japanese Imperialism in Asia
  3. Allied Victory and The Holocaust
  4. Effects of World War II
Read Chapter 15 Section 4 and Chapter 16 Sections 1-5 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Modern World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 30: India, Pakistan, and Myanmar (c. 1900 C.E. – Present)
  1. Indian Nationalist Movement
  2. India and Pakistan
  3. Islamic Fundamentalism
  4. Democratic Reform in Southeast Asia
  5. Nationalism in Southwest Asia
  6. Monsoons and the Green Revolution
Read Chapter 14 Section 4 and Chapter 18 Section 1 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Modern World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 31: Decolonization of Sub-Saharan Africa (1945 C.E. – Present)
  1. Independence Movements in Africa
  2. Tribalism vs. Nationalism
  3. Christianity and Islam 
  4. Republic of South Africa
  5. AIDS and Human Trafficking
Read Chapter 18 Section 3 and Chapter 19 Sections 2-3 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Modern World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 32: Middle East (1947 – Present)
  1. Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
  2. Islamic Fundamentalism
Read Chapter 17 Section 4, Chapter 18 Sections 4-5, and Chapter 20 Sections 2-4 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Modern World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 33: People's Republic of China and Taiwan (1911 – Present)
  1. Chinese Civil War: Communists vs. Nationalists
  2. People's Republic of China
  3. Deng Xiaoping and the Four Modernizations
  4. Human Rights and Globalization
Read Chapter 12 Section 1, Chapter 14 Section 3, Chapter 17 Section 2, and Chapter 19 Section 5 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Modern World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.

Unit 34: The Cold War Era and the Post-Cold War Era (1945 – Present)
  1. Cold War
  2. Korean and Vietnam War
  3. Cuban and Nicaraguan Revolutions
  4. Destalinization in the Soviet Union
  5. Glasnost and Perestroika
  6. Collapse of the Soviet Union
  7. Nationalism, Ethnicity, Religion and Human Rights Violations in Eastern Europe
  8. European Union
  9. International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and the World Trade Organization
  10. Latin American Free Trade Area and the North American Free Trade Agreement
  11. Anti-Globalization Activism
Read Chapter 17 Section 1 and 3-5, Chapter 19 Sections 3-4, and Chapter 20 Sections 1-5 in Beck, Roger B., Linda Black, Larry S. Krieger, Phillip C. Naylor, and Dahia Ibo.Shabaka. Modern World History Patterns of Interaction. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2006.