Pre-AP World History Summer Reading and Assignment

Pre-AP World History in 9th grade is designed to prepare students to be successful in a college-level history course. AP World History in 10th grade is a college-level history course. Neither course is an “honors” or “accelerated” course. Ideally, AP World History is a 12th grade course, after a standard world history course in an earlier grade. As such, students are expected to keep up with the rigorous lessons and activities provided in these courses. Students are required to complete an extensive amount of reading on their own almost every night, complete Cornell note-taking assignments based on the textbook readings, complete projects outside of the classroom, actively engage in classroom participation, and should be willing to put forth the appropriate level of effort studying the content. Students should understand that the intended next step for a pre-AP student is to enroll in AP courses in subsequent years, which should allow him or her to earn college credit. Pre-AP World History is geared to prepare students for this challenge. These two courses are heavily focused on reading and writing, analyzing and interpreting primary source documents, and formal assessments. Students are not automatically expected to have all of the required writing and analytical skills as some of these will be taught and developed over the course of these two years. However, students are expected to be proficient in higher level thinking skills by the end of these two courses, if not sooner. It is expected, however, that the student enter the classroom each day willing to put forth the effort to learn with a positive attitude; this will go a long way in the success of the student. 


Throughout the school year, students will need to complete 4 to 6 Cornell note-taking assignments on a weekly basis. The Cornell note-taking summer assignment would be equivalent to 2 weeks of their required reading assignments for pre-AP and AP World History.


Cornell Note-taking System

The Cornell note-taking system allows students to keep their notes organized, be able to summarize the main points in a section of reading, and allows students to quickly identify key words and key concepts for review. 

    1. Students must be responsible for their own learning. Students will need to spend time completing their Cornell Note-taking assignments.
    2. These notes must be used as a study guide for AP exam preparation. It is impossible to cover all of the required materials in the AP World History curriculum in class. 
    3. The arrangement of information is aesthetically pleasing and easy to scan, making it easy to locate particular pieces of information. 

Major goals for the Cornell Note-taking system are to assist students in taking comprehensive notes and to be engaged in this activity rather than merely copying down something they have seen. 

    1. Furthermore, this process assists students in discerning the most important information in lessons and reading. 
    2. Additionally, the organizational benefits are considerable when students use the system consistently. 
    3. Additionally, the organizational benefits are considerable when students use the system consistently. 

Reading Comprehension

Reading comprehension is the key to analyzing primary and secondary documents, and answering texted-based multiple-choice questions. 

    1. Re-read guided notes, close readings, textbook, and primary and secondary documents for comprehension.
    2. Reading comprehension is the ability to read text, process it and understand its meaning. 
    3. DO NOT Speed Read! It is impossible for most students to speed read a text, process it and understand its meaning. 
    4. Student should NOT be reading the assigned text to “just get it done”.


Active Reader Strategies 

Before Reading

    1. Focus on an essential question that the text helps answer 
    2. Preview the text to determine the topic and the text’s structure and purpose (e.g., argument, narrative, explanation) 
    3. Use the title and preview of the text to activate prior knowledge 
    4. Develop questions about the text and/or its topic that might be answered when reading 

During Reading

    1. Monitor reading to ensure comprehension 
    2. Answer questions developed before reading 
    3. Annotate the text with Post-it Notes for main ideas, answers to questions, interesting or surprising aspects of the text, and parts of it that are difficult to understand 
    4. Periodically stop and reflect on what’s being read and how it fits with prior knowledge and the other parts of the text 

After Reading

    1. Respond to questions developed before and during reading 
    2. Reflect on the text, what it means, and whether it supports or refutes prior ideas and understandings 
    3. Draw conclusions and devise generalizations 
    4. Make connections to other texts, key concepts, and overarching ideas 
    5. Discuss the text with peers to ensure understanding and have remaining questions answered 


Procrastination

Procrastination is putting off or avoiding doing something that a person must do. It is natural to procrastinate occasionally. However, excessive procrastination can result in guilt feelings about not doing a task when it should be done. It also causes anxiety since the task still needs to be done. Further, excessive procrastination causes poor performance if a student tries to complete a task with little time remaining. In short, excessive procrastination can interfere in doing well in all subjects in school.

    1. Students are given more time than needed to accurately complete an assignment, such as a Cornell note-taking assignment.
    2. Students are instructed to finish the Review Self-Test or essay pre-writing a few days before the test to have time to study.
    3. However, many students usually do not get a good night rest before the test because they are attempted to complete an assignment(s) in one night, rather than dividing the materials into “chunks” to complete over a few days.
    4. All assignment due dates and assessment dates are listed daily on Mr. Stresing’s Assignments & Assessments Calendar (stresing.net).

Summer Reading and Cornell Note-taking Assignment

Pre-WHAP Summer Cornell note-taking assignment will be collected at the beginning of the first class of pre-AP World History next school year. NO late assignment will be accepted for credit.

Download Summer Assignment with Student Exemplars

Download Summer Reading from Robert Strayer, Ways of the World: A Global History with Sources for AP, 2nd Edition

    1. Read pp. 3-20 in Robert Strayer, Ways of the World: A Global History with Sources for AP, 2nd Edition and complete First Migrations Out of Africa Cornell Notes
    2. Read pp. 20-23 in Robert Strayer, Ways of the World: A Global History with Sources for AP, 2nd Edition and complete Hunting and Gathering Economy Cornell Notes
    3. Read pp. 24-34 in Robert Strayer, Ways of the World: A Global History with Sources for AP, 2nd Edition and complete The Great Transition Cornell Notes
    4. Read pp. 34-39 in Robert Strayer, Ways of the World: A Global History with Sources for AP, 2nd Edition and complete Globalization of Agriculture Cornell Notes
    5. Read pp. 39-45 in Robert Strayer, Ways of the World: A Global History with Sources for AP, 2nd Edition and complete Agricultural Revolution Societies Cornell Notes
    6. Read pp. 46-50 in Robert Strayer, Ways of the World: A Global History with Sources for AP, 2nd Edition and complete A Paleolithic Woman in the 20th Century Cornell Notes
    7. Read pp. 51-59 in Robert Strayer, Ways of the World: A Global History with Sources for AP, 2nd Edition and complete History before Writing Cornell Notes

Additional Cornell Note-taking Student Exemplars

French Revolution and the Napoleonic Empire (1789-1815 C.E.) Student Exemplars

The Industrial Revolution (1700-1914 C.E.) Student Exemplars