Data Analysis and Results(Observations)

In this section, the data shown in the graphs and tables are summarized. The averages of the dependent variable measures are shown in the tables along with the graphs helping verify the stated Hypotheses.

  The percentage absorbances of 560 nm of Standards, as shown in Figure 8.1, were recorded to ensure that the reactions between Catalase Enzyme and metal ions with the hydrogen peroxide actually took place. It is necessary to calculate the absorbance% of 560 nm when the reaction has not yet taken place. This is required to study the relative effect of the Catalase Enzyme and metal ions.

Graph 9.1 below shows that after 3 minutes, the average % of absorbance (at 560 nm) in 22 Degrees Celsius is 87.0533% when the Iron is added with the Catalase enzyme, 91.01867% when Copper is added, and 81.46667% when no metal is added. The addition of Copper hastens the production of oxygen in 22 Degrees Celsius contradicting with Hypothesis 1a. The addition of Iron with the Catalase speeds up the decomposition rate of hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water in 22 Degrees Celsius confirming Hypothesis 2a.

 

Graph 9.1 also shows that after 3 minutes the average % of absorbance (at 560 nm) in 30 Degrees Celsius is 97.6887 when the Iron is added with the Catalase enzyme, 99.0000 when Copper is added, and 84.06867 when no metal is added (control). The addition of Copper enhances the ability of Catalase to produce oxygen in 30 Degrees Celsius as shown above contradicting with Hypothesis 1b. The addition of Iron with the Catalase speeds up the decomposition rate of hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water confirming Hypothesis 2b. The higher percentage of absorbance of 560 nm at 30 Degrees Celsius in comparison to 22 Degrees Celsius helps show that a higher temperature speeds up the ability of Catalase to decompose hydrogen peroxide. This holds true in all three conditions-Ferrous Sulphate, Copper Sulphate, and Control. Therefore, temperature is a critical variable affecting the speed of Catalase. (Enzymes are known to be less effective in lower temperatures.)

 

Graph 9.2 shows the averages for all 30 trials of Copper, Iron, and the Control (22 Degrees Celsius and 30 Degrees Celsius). This graph suggests that different metals have an effect on the efficacy of Catalase to decompose hydrogen peroxide. When the reaction between the metals, substrate, Guaiacol dye, and Catalase enzyme has taken place, the resulting solution along with the Sulfuric acid contains more oxygen (reflected by the intensity of the brownness) than the control. Therefore the Ferrous Sulphate and Copper Sulphate speed up the decomposition rate of hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water by enhancing the ability of Catalase, contradicting Hypothesis 1 and confirming Hypothesis 2.