Chapter 4


CHAPTER IV.

We will now note the changes that occurred in the membership of the Company during this year, together with the names of those who died of disease contracted in the service.

Capt. Charles D. Anderson was promoted to the rank of Major, to wear the star of the gallant Major Philemon Tracy, killed in battle at Sharpsburg on the 17th of September. 1st Lieut. James M. Culpepper was promoted Captain, to fill Anderson’s place. 2d Lieut. Jonnathan D. Cowart was promoted 1st Lieutenant, to fill Culpepper’s place, and 3d Lieut. Jefferson M. Gray, who had this year been elected to fill the place made vacant by the promotion of 3rd Lieutenant Cowart to the 2nd Lieutenancy, upon the death of 2nd Lieut. Jones, killed in battle at Cold Harbor on the 27th of June, was promoted 2nd Lieutenant, to fill Cowart’s place.

Private Seaborn M. Hunt was elected 3rd Lieutenant, to fill the vacancy made by the promotion of 3rd Lieut. Gray. Upon the election of Orderly Sergeant Jefferson M. Gray to the 3rd Lieutenancy, to fill the place made vacant by the promotion of 3rd Lieut. Cowart to the 2nd Lieutenancy after the death of 2nd Lieut. Thomas S. Jones, killed in battle at Cold Harbor on the 29 of June, as before stated, 2nd Sergt. Amos W. Murray was promoted Orderly Sergeant, and 3d Sergt. Isaac N. Vinson was promoted 2nd Sergeant, and 5th Sergt. Joel L. Diseker was promoted 3rd Sergeant. 4th Sergeant Samuel Felder having been killed in battle at Seven Pines on the 31st. of May, as berfore stated, 2nd Corporal Samuel H. Hiley was promoted 4th Sergeant.

1st Corporal Leonidas Brown having been killed in battle at Cold Harbor on the 27th of June, as before stated; 3rd Corporal Bryant Vinson was promoted 5th Sergeant. Private Richard H. Powell was elected 1st Corporal, and Private Talbot G. Hammock was elected 2nd Corporal. 4th Corporal Reuben A. Kilby was promoted 3rd Corporal, and 5th Corporal Geo. W. Cheves was promoted 4th Corporal. Private Lewis F. Anderson was transferred to Butler’s South Carolina Cavalry, then on duty in that State. With this command he remainded to the close of the war. C. D. Anderson, Jr. was discharged on the grounds of physical disability. He never afterward joined any branch of the service. Privates Chas. G. Gray, Green Avera, and Thos. O. Skellie, being minors, were discharged. Upon arriving at full age, they again entered the service with the Western army.

5th Corporal Geo. W. Cheves was placed upon detached service with the Signal Service Department in Virginia. With this department he remained to the close of the war. Private Jon Etheridge was discharged upon the grounds of physical disability. He again entered the service with Souther Rights Battery wher he shortly afterwards died of disease contracted in the service.

Private William M. Haslam was appointed Hospital Steward. In this position he remained to the close of the war. Dr. Haslam will long be remembered by those, for whose welfare he ever exerted himself to the best of his ability, and exercised the most vigilant care. Private William F. McGehee was appointed to a position as orderly on Gen. Colquitt’s non-commissioned staff. In this position he remained to the close of the war.

Private John C. Humber was transferred; but the command to which the transfer was made, not recollected.

On the grand, but fatiguing march into Maryland, Private Sumter Belvin being sick, broke down, and was suddenly missing. We afterwards learned that he was captured by the enemy, among whom, he mte an old schoolmate, who had him kindly cared for until he got well; after which, he was sent to Point Lookout, Md., where he died. His remains were brought home after the war.

Sergeant-Major John M. Miller was transferred to a Cavalry command in Louisiana--name and number of command not recollected. With this command he remained to the close of the war. 4th Corporal Reuben A. Kilby was furloughed, and never returned to the Company. The cause of his delinquency has never been known. His home was in Florida, and he was furloughed to that State, and we learn joined a Cavalry command.

Private John Mayo was furloughed and returned to his home, which was in Florida. He voluntarily united with some Florida Militia, and was killed in a skermish near Marianna Florida.

Private Uriah Slappy was discharged upon the grounds of physical disability. Whether he afterward united with any branch of the service not recollected.

Private John D. Aultman died at a hospital at Winchester, Virginia, of disease contracted in the service. Private Stephen D. Clark died in a hospital at Richmond, Virginia, of disease contracted in the service. Private Alexander Finlayson died in camp of disease contracted in the service. Corporal Theophalos Hardison died at his home in Houston county, Georgia, of disease contracted in the service. Corporal Geo. M. D. Hunt died at his home in Houston county, Georgia, of disease contracted in the service. Privates D. Hearn and O, Hearn died at their home in Houston county, Georgia, of disease contracted in the service. Private James M. Mason died at his home in Houston county, Georgia, of disease contracted in the service. Private Alexander Sullivan died from accidentally treading bare-footed on an inverted nail which pierced through his foot, producing lock-jaw. Death ensued almost instantly. Private Allen Sullivan died in camp of disease contracted in the service. Private Andrew J. Shirah died of small-pox at a field-hospital near Fredericksburg, Virginia. Sergt. Ulysses M. Gunn, of whom mention has already been made in the third Chapter, was, for meritorious conduct on the battle-field at Seven Pines, on the 31st of May, in triumphantly and gallantly bringing the colors out of that bloody battle, after Sergeant McElvain, the gallant Ensign, and all the guard except himself had been killed dead on the field, appointed Regimental Ensign, with the rank and pay of 1st Sergeant of Infantry. On the 27th of June, he carried the colors aloft into the battle of Cold Harbor, and fell severely wounded. He was borne from the field by Lieutenant Culpepper. The flesh and muscles were lacerated, and thigh and hip bones fractured for nineteen inches. His recovery was miraculous. The loss of blood was so great, he remained in a stupor for five days, not being able during that time to hold up his head without fainting. On the next day, 28th, Dr. Henry A. Mettaner, the very efficient and energetic Surgeon of our Regiment, extracted the ball. Two days afterward, on the 30th, he was sent to Richmond, and placed in the Seabrook Hospital. Here he remained in a delirious state till his brother, who had been telegraphed for, arrived and removed him to a private house on Maine Street. Here he lingered between life and death till August, when he was removed home, where he remained supinely on his back till November.

Being quite young when the war commenced, and his education unfinished, he decided in the following Spring to resume his studies under his former instructor, Prof. James E. Crossland, then rector of the Male High School at Marion, Twiggs county, Georgia. He soon left this school on account of prevalence of scarlet fever, and entered the Mount Zion High School in Hancock county, Georgia, where he remained till the passage of an Act by the Confederate Congress, approved the 14th of February 1864, taking into service of a sedentary nature the maimed soldiery. Whereupon Sergeant Gunn, though yet upon his crutches, reported promptly for duty at Macon, Georgia. He was appointed enrolling officer, and assigned duty in Dooly county, Georgia. Finding in that county 124 men due the Government service under said Act.

He consented at their request, to lead them as Captain, and reported promptly at Macon, Georgia, with them for duty, and was mustered into service as Company “G,” Fifth Regiment of Georgia Reserves.

This regiment was appointed guard of the Macon stockade, containing 1,100 Federal officer, held as prisoners of war. Here the regiment remained on duty till Stonemans’s raid, the latter part of this year. To Capt. Gunn was assigned the duty of searching Gen. Stoneman and removing the contraband articles when Stoneman was brought into Macon a prisoner. After this raid of Stoneman, the regiment was ordered to the front at Lovejoy’s Station. Soon after this, the regiment was ordered to Savannah by way of Thomasville, to meet Sherman’s invading army.

Upon the evacuation of Savannah, the regiment was withdrawn through South Carolina. It is but merited justice that Capt. Gunn to state that, during the entire campaign of his second entry into the service, he was unable to march without the aid of crutches or stick.

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NOTE.--We omitted to mention at the proper



 

time and place, that Private George W. Slappy was wounded at Sharpsburg, Maryland, on the 17th of September. And, also, that Private Alexander Gloxier was killed in that battle, as was also Private Stephen Corder. And that Sergeant Major John M. Miller was severely wounded at Mechanicsville on the 26th of June.

We will also note in conclusion a little incident which occurred on the night of the 19th of September, two days after the battle of Sharpsburg, and the night on which Lee, closely pursued by McClellan, recrossed the Potomac near Shepherdstown. Private Charles D. Anderson, Jr. being in feeble health, and unable to wade the river, and dreading to be left behind as he would inevitably fall into the hands of the enemy, Private Wendell D. Croom took him on his back and boldly waded into the river, and carried him safely across. This occurred about three o’clock in the night. This would have forcibly reminded one of the old saying of the “kitten toting the old cat”, as both men at that time, would not, if weighed together, have weighed two hundred pounds. The river at this point, at low water, was about one hundred yards wide, and from knee to waist deep to a man of ordinary height.

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