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Human Trafficking in the USA


American Victims Outnumber International Victims 10-to-1


In the United States, there are as many as 17,500 international victims per year who are smuggled or transported within the U.S. to be enslaved in either forced labor or sex-work. (Trafficking in Persons Report, 2013)


Myths about human trafficking in the United States

      Mostly involves people brought here from other nations

      • Over time, the number of American-born (domestic) victims of trafficking in the U.S. has surpassed the number of international victims by a great margin (10-to-1). (Department of Justice)
      • Based on the National Human Trafficking Resource Hotline (2007-2012 trends), the number one language for survivors of human trafficking was English. Statistics showed that 72.96% of survivors spoke English. (Polaris Project)

      Only happens in states that border with Mexico or Coastal states

      • “The terms human trafficking and sex slavery usually conjure up images of young girls beaten and abused in faraway places, like Eastern Europe, Asia, or Africa. Actually, human sex trafficking and sex slavery happens locally in cities and towns, both large and small, throughout the United States, right in citizens’ backyards.” (Source: FBI)

      All sex trafficking victims are young females

      • Both males and females can be victims of sex trafficking. The average age of entry into prostitution for girls is 12 to 14 years of age. The average age of entry into prostitution for boys is 11 to 13 years of age.  (Polaris Project)

      The trafficker is a stranger who kidnaps their victim

      • This is not true. Most victims are unknowingly lured into sex trafficking by someone they know. They are often unaware that it is happening until it is too late. The number one red flag for being recruited for sex trafficking is through a well known deception tactic called the“boyfriend pimp.” According to the National Human Trafficking Resource Center, 51.42% of cases reported from 2007-2012, involved a trafficker posing as a "significant other" to lure in their victim. (Source: Polaris Project)
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