University of Mary Washington

The University of Mary Washington District encompasses the campus and buildings of the University. Located in the western portion of the city of Fredericksburg, the University district takes the shape of an elongated rectangle as it is contained by College Avenue and Sunken Road, which run parallel to each other. Monroe Hall and Willard Hall, located in the center of the present day campus, were the first University buildings constructed in 1911.


Alvey Hall

Alvey Hall and its sister building, Arrington Hall, are the two newest residence halls at Mary Washington. Alvey is home to approximately 150 first-year students living on four floors. All rooms have suite bathrooms, bunkable beds, wooden desks and central air conditioning. Special features of Alvey Hall include a kitchen and laundry room on each floor and an elevator.


Apartments at UMW (1966)

The Apartments at UMW opened in Fall 2003 and offer true apartment-style living for juniors and seniors. Built between 1966 and 1969, each apartment building is three stories in height with two of them having partial basements. Each building has an enclosed central stairway that connects all levels and provides the primary entry and exit to the building. Typically, there are four apartments per floor and each apartment offers either a balcony or concrete patio.


Arrington Hall (1993)

Arrington Hall, completed in 1993, is Mary Washington’s newest residence hall. This hall was named for Arabelle Arrington (Class of ‘47) in April, 2005 for her outstanding contributions to UMW.


Ball Hall (1935)

This residence hall was built in 1935. Ball hall is built in the neoclassical style and consists of a steel or concrete frame with brick veneer. The building is symmetrical having 3 stories and 21 bays. A concrete porch with full height concrete Corinthian columns adorns the façade of the building. All windows have keystone arches, and a full entablature, as well as a belt course, run the length and width of the building. Ball hall is the main section of the tri-unit configuration that includes Custis Hall and Madison Hall.



Brent Hall (1929)

Brent Hall was built in 1929 in the Dutch Colonial style. It existed as a private residence until 1944 when Sue Boulware sold it to the Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia, which Mary Washington College was a part of at the time. This residence is situated on the site of the original land purchased for the State Normal and Industrial College for Women in 1909. Brent Hall is a four story building, constructed out of Flemish brick bond. There are four bays on the front façade as well as two end chimneys and an attached garage. The gambrel roof utilizes slate roofing materials.

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Bushnell Hall (1954)

Bushnell hall was built in 1954 in the classical style. It is constructed of brick and has three and a half stories with a raised basement. The building is symmetrical with thirteen bays in the front. The roof is either flat or parapet. The building is named in honor of Nina G. Bushnell, Dean of Women 1921-1950.

 


Chandler Hall (1928)

Chandler Hall was built in two stages. Initial construction took place in 1928 when the building was created as a training school for teachers. This training program ended in 1938 when the final addition of the large front portico was added. Chandler is built in the neoclassical style, constructed out of brick. There are two stories and a raised basement. The building is symmetrical with nine bays in the front. The roof is hipped and has slate roofing materials. The primary porch on the front façade of the building is in the Greek Revival style. The full height porch, made of stone and wood, consists of four stone ionic columns with egg and dart decoration. The pediment displays a large clock and the main door exhibits pilasters, pediment and transom lights. Today Chandler is an Academic building that houses the Business and Psychology Departments.


Combs Hall (1958)

Combs Hall is an academic building that was constructed in the Colonial Revival style in 1958. Combs is constructed with a concrete or steel frame with a brick veneer. There are three stories and a low basement. The building is symmetrical with seventeen bays on the front side and the roof is flat. The primary porch has two Corinthian pilasters flanking either side of the main entrance. There is a full entablature with a transom light over the door. Every window on the front façade has a keystone. There is also a full entablature with dentils lining the crest of the roof.


Cornell House

During the 1984-85 school year this building that formerly housed the Center for Historic Preservation was converted to a residence for several male students. Cornell House is located on Sunken road next to the Betty Lewis apartments.

Custis Hall (1937)

Named for Mary Custis, wife of Robert E. Lee this building has been both a women's and men's dormitory in the years since its completion. It is part of the tri-unit that also includes Ball Hall and Madison Hall. Custis is built in the neoclassical style and consists of a steel or concrete frame with brick veneer.



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Dupont Hall (1951)

This building was built in 1951 as part of a larger fine arts complex including Pollard Hall and Melchers Hall. It was named for Jesse Dupont, the closest living relative at the time, of Mary Washington. The building was designed by the Walford and Wright firm. Dupont is built in a Neoclassical/Georgian style, constructed of concrete and steel frame and clad in brick. It has two stories and a raised basement. The building is symmetrical with fifteen bays on the front façade. The roof is flat and the roofing materials are not visible. The primary porch on the front façade is built in the Greek revival style and is two stories in height.

 


Fairfax House  (1927)

Named after Anne Fairfax of Fredericksburg the Fairfax House is built in the Colonial Revival style. This small white framed house as purchased by the College in 1930 from the widow of former President A. B. Chandler. It has been used as an infirmary, the residence and offices of the Dean of Students and as the headquarters of the Alumni Association. Today it is the location of the Office of Human Resources. Fairfax House is of wood frame construction and has weatherboard cladding. It is one and a half stories with a low basement and has three bays on the front facade. Composite shingles cover the gambrel roof of this building. The primary front porch consists of paired wooden Tuscan columns on a concrete slab with a pedimented gable roof. There are two interior end chimneys. The front door has side lights and a transom.


Fitness Center (2004)

Opened in February of 2004, this brand new facility connects to the auxiliary gym of Goolrick Hall, and is the new home of UMW's Office of Campus Recreation and the Wellness Resource Center.


Framar House (1930)

Originally owned by Dr. and Mrs. Frank H. Reichel, Framar was purchased by the College in 1946. It was used as the President's home until 1948, when Brompton was ready for use. It has since been used as a small dormitory for students. Framar is constructed of brick, Flemish bond. It consists of two and a half stories including a low basement. There are seven bays in the front facade and the building possesses a gable roof composed of slate roofing material. The primary porch on the front facade is constructed out of wood and concrete. It consists of a concrete slab with square wooden  columns and a palladian cross gabled portico.


George Washington Hall (1938)

Goolrick Hall (1969)

The gym was built in 1969 in response to the growing needs of the college. It is named after C. O’Connor Goolrick who is the legislative founder of Mary Washington. This building sits on top of a rather steep hill. It is a four story, concrete, steel frame building with a flat roof. The exterior is clad in brick veneer and only the front façade of the building has windows.




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Hamlet House (c. 1920)

Named for W. N. Hamlet, professor of mathematics and science from 1911 to 1942, this house was purchased by the College from Mr. Hamlet and his wife in 1937. It was originally used as a student residence, and later saw service as a psychological clinic and counseling center. Today Hamlet House is the home of the Information Systems offices. Hamlet House is built in the Colonial Revival style. It is constructed of a wood frame with weatherboard cladding on the exterior. There are two stories, two bays on the front facade, and a low basement. The gable roof is covered with composite shingles.


Jefferson Hall (1966)

Named after Thomas Jefferson, this residential building was one of the most innovative when it was completed in 1966. It was the first residential building on campus to incoporate elevators and single student rooms. Jefferson Hall, along with Combs and Bushnell stands on the former site of a reservoir used by the city of Fredericksburg for many years. Jefferson is built in the Colonial Revival style. It is constructed out of brick and steel frame. The building consists of four stories, thirteen front facade bays and a low basement. The roof is flat, and the roofing materials are not visible. The primary porch on the front facade of Jefferson consists of concrete Ionic columns resting on a concrete slab with a concrete railing and balustrade. A roof-line wooden balustrade is also present. A full entablature runs along the roof line.


Jepson Science Center (1998)

The Jepson Science Center opened its doors in fall 1998, and is located at the north end of the campus, between duPont and Goolrick Halls. Jepson houses the Departments of Biological Sciences, Environmental Science and Geology, Chemistry, and Physics.


Lee Hall (1951)

Ann Carter Lee Hall is named for the wife of Henry Lee and the mother of Robert E. Lee. From its beginnings in 1928 as the site of the College swimming pool, Lee Hall has served as a student activites center at the University. The original swimming pool was covered in the late 1970's to convert the space into a student pub. By 1983 Lee Hall included within its walls a bank, the College Police, the Bookstore, the counseling and Health centers, the office for the Dean of students, the headquarters for the Honor Council and Student Association and the campus radio station. After the renovations to Lee Hall completed in 2009 the building now houses the Admissions office, Financial Aid, Health Center, James Farmer Multicultural Center, the Psychological Services Center, Business Services, Office of Publications, Student Affairs, the University Police, the University Bookstore, WMWC 91.5 FM radio, the Judicial Review Board and the Honor Council. Lee Hall is built in the Neoclassical style. It is constructed of brick and consists of five stories including a raised basement. The front facade contains eleven symmetrical bays. The roof is hipped and covered in composite shingles. The primary porch of Lee Hall is recessed into the facade and is made up of round Ionic columns.


Madison Hall (1937)

Madison Hall is named for Dolley Madison the wife of the fourth President of the U.S. Part of the tri-unit including Ball and Custis Halls that faces on to Ball Circle. Madison Hall was the first residence hall to house only men at the university. Today it still remains a residence and is also home to the Service Learning Floor.



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Marshall Hall (1960)

Located at the bottom of "the hill", on part of the orignial land bought by the State Normal and Industrial School for Women in 1909, Marshall was orignially a female residence, and later a co-educational one. Marshall is built in the Neoclassical style. It is constructed out of brick and consists of three stories including a low basement. The front facade contains thirteen symmetrical bays. The roof is flat and the roofing materials are not visible. The primary porch is two stories and consists of six rounded Doric columns.


Marye House (c. 1911)

The original name of this house was "Ridge Crest", and it, like nearly every other house owned by the College, was the President's home at one time. This building however was the first such residence. In 1946 Marye, as it was later named, became a student residence. It was moved down the hill slightly to make room for Randolph and Mason Hall's. Today it is home to the Dean of Student Life, Judicial Affairs and Community Responsibility, and the Office of Residence Life and Housing. Built in the Greek Revival style, Marye House is constructed of wood frame and weatherboard. It consists of three stories, a low basement, and five symmetrical front bays. The roof is hipped and covered with composite shingles. The primary porch, made of wood, is pedimented with eight rounded Ionic columns, and a wooden balustrade railing across the porch.


Mason Hall (1954)

Mason Hall is named for Ann Thomson Mason, whose son George authored the Virginia Bill of Rights. Mason is the mirror image of Randolph Hall which is positioned diagonally across. Mason's rooms extended under the terrace that separates it from Randolph, an area known as Mason Tunnel. For a short time during the 1970's, the tunnel rooms housed the first male residential students at MWC, and were referred to collectively as Tyler Hall. Mason is built in the Neoclassical style, and is constructed of brick. It consists of four stories, a raised basement and nineteen symmetrical front bays. The roof is flat and the roofing materials are not visible. The primary porch is built in the Greek Revival style with six rounded Doric columns and two pilasters. A balustrade exists on the porch roof line and the front door exhibits rectangular lights. The roof line of the building has a cornice and a balustrade.


Melchers Hall (1951)

Melchers Hall is named after Gari Melchers, the internationally known artist whose home of Belmont has been maintained by the College since 1957. Melchers Hall houses the Departments of Art and Art History. It is one of the three buildings that make up the UMW Fine Arts Complex. Melchers Hall is built in the Neoclassical style and is a mirror image of Pollard Hall. It is constructed of concrete block and steel frame with a brick veneer. The building consists of three stories, no basement and nineteen symmetrical bays on the front facade. The roof is flat and the roofing materials are not visible. The primary porch is two levels, with the first level of the porch extending the full length of the building. There is an arched arcade covering the walkway under the porch.


Mercer Hall (1950)

Mercer Hall is named for General Hugh Mercer, a Fredericksburg physician and Revolutionary War soldier. Mercer Hall was initially used as the infirmary and counseling center. In the 1980's the building became a women's dormitory when the student health services were transferred to Lee Hall. Mercer Hall is currently housing Faculty Offices due to the Monroe Hall renovations. Mercer is constructed out of brick in the Neoclassical style. It consists of three stories, a low basement and nine symmetrical bays on the front. The roof is hipped and covered with metal standing seam roofing materials. The primary porch is constructed in the Greek Revival style with four Doric columns, two Doric pilasters, a modillion cornice and a roof balustrade.


Monroe Hall (1911)

Pollard Hall (1951)

Pollard Hall is ironically named after John G. Pollard, Governor and Attorney General of Virginia, who in 1932 vetoed legislation that would have made the Fredericksburg State Teachers College a liberal arts institution. Pollard Hall is home to the University's Department of Music and is one of the three parts making up the UMW Fine Arts Complex. Pollard Hall is built in the Neoclassical style and is a mirror image of Melchers Hall. It is constructed of concrete block and steel frame with a brick veneer. The building consists of three stories, no basement and nineteen symmetrical bays on the front facade. The roof is flat and the roofing materials are not visible. The primary porch is two levels, with the first level of the porch extending the full length of the building. There is an arched arcade covering the walkway under the porch.



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Randolph Hall (1955)

Randolph residence Hall is named after Martha Jefferson Randolph, daughter of President Thomas Jefferson and wife of Virginia Governor Thomas M. Randolph. Randolph is built in the Neoclassical style and is a mirror image of Mason Hall which sits across from it. Randolph is constructed of brick. It consists of four stories, a low basement and nineteen symmetrical front bays. The roof is flat and the roofing materials are not visible. The primary porch is built in the Greek Revival style with six rounded Doric columns and two pilasters. A balustrade exists on the porch roof line and the front door exhibits rectangular lights. The roof line of the building has a cornice and a balustrade.


Ridderhof Martin Gallery

The Ridderhof Martin Gallery presents art exhibitions and educational events of interest to the University community and the general public.


Russell Hall (1965)

Russell Residence Hall is named for Edward H. Russell the first President of Mary Washington College. Russell is the second campus building to bear the name of the College's first president, the other being the edifice now known as Monroe. The dormitory features a curved design against the hillside on which it rests. Russell Hall is built in the Neoclassical style and constructed of brick. It consists of four stories, a low basement and nineteen symmetrical bays on the front facade. The roof is flat and there are no visible roofing materials. There is no primary porch, but the entrance consists of double doors with a transom and broken pediment as well as cornice trim with dentils. Five round windows are place symmetrically over the entrance.


Seacobeck Hall (1930)

The name seacobeck is derived from the name of an Algonquin tribe of Native Americans that inhabited the area that then became Fredericksburg. The original structure was composed of the kitchen, dome room and two wings known today as North and South rooms built in 1930. The remaining two wings were added in 1950 to accommodate a larger population of students. Today  the dining area is split into the four rooms (Washington Diner, South Market, UMW Bistro and the Faculty/Staff dining room). In the basement is the offices of Student Activities and Community Services, student organizations, Design Services and the Document Center. Seacobeck is built in the Neoclassical style and constructed of brick. It consists of one story, a raised basement and is symmetrical in shape. The roof is hipped and covered with metal standing seam roofing materials. The primary porch is full height and in the Neoclassical style. It is lined with thirteen Corinthian columns and has a balustrade above.


Simpson Library (1987)

Simpson library is built in a modern style, constructed out of concrete block and steel frame with overlying brick veneer. It consists of three stories, a low basement and fifteen symmetrical front bays. The roof is flat and the roofing materials are not visible. Round columns serve as support posts and at the main entrance there is a rectangular outcrop of a porch.



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South Hall



Trinkle Hall (1940)

Trinkle Hall is named after E. Lee Trinkle who was a devoted advocate of education throughout his long career as Governor of Virginia and President of the State Board of Education. Prior to 1987 Trinkle Hall served as the University's library. Today Trinkle houses the Departments of Computer Science, Classics, Philosophy, Religion, Education, and Mathematics. Built in the Neoclassical style, the building is constructed of brick. It consists of three stories, a raised basement and seven symmetrical bays in the front facade. The roof is flat, with a large dome protruding over the entrance of the building. The primary porch is built in the classical rotunda style with a palladian window over a broken pedimented door, and four round Ionic columns.


Tyler House (c. 1922)

Tyler House originally bore the name Anne Fairfax Annex, because of its connection to the Fairfax house. It was acquired by the College from J.H. Chiles the superintendent of Spotsylvania County Public Schools. For a time it was a home economics laboratory and then a counseling center. It was moved from its location facing the driveway through the college to a location behind Fairfax House. In the late 1970's the House was the residence of the Honor Council and Student Association Presidents. In the early 1980's it served as the headquarters for Honor Council, Student Association and Class Council. Today Tyler houses offices for the Bachelor of Liberal Studies program. Built in the Colonial Revival style, Tyler House is constructed of a wood frame and clad in weatherboard. It consists of two and a half stories, a low basement and three asymmetrical bays in the front facade. The roof is hipped and covered with metal pressed tin shingles. The primary porch consists of modified Tuscan columns with a wooden balustrade and railing.


Virginia Hall (1915)

Named after the Commonwealth of Virginia, Virginia Hall became the second dormitory on campus in 1915. Over the next several decades Virginia Hall housed not only students but also the College post office, the library, the office and residence of the Dean of Women, and dining facilities. By the 1950's the entire building was devoted to residential use by students. Virginia Hall is built in the Neoclassical style and is constructed of brick. It consists of three stories, a low basement and nine symmetrical bays on the front facade. The roof is hipped and covered with metal standing seam roofing materials. The primary porch is full height and built in the Greek Revival style. It consists of four Doric stone columns, a modillion cornice, a roof balustrade, two Doric pilasters and pediment over the door with transom lights. On the rear facade of the building is a three bay porch with Doric columns. There are also small porches on the east and west facades with six fluted Doric columns and triglyph and metope frieze.


Westmoreland Hall (1938)

Westmoreland Hall is named for the county of Virginia that was home to George Washington and Robert E. Lee. Built in the Neoclassical style, Westmoreland is constructed of brick and steel frame. It consists of three stories, a low basement and fifteen symmetrical bays on the front facade. The roof is flat and the roofing materials are not visible. The primary porch is built in the Neoclassical style with wooden Corithian columns, a full entablature and a roof line balustrade.


Willard Hall (1911)

Willard Hall, along with Monroe, has seen the University of Mary Washington develop over the past century. The dormitory of today has in the past housed most of the University's support services. During the early years it contained the dining rooms, infirmary, post office, a college gift shop, the Tea room, and office/classroom space. Today it is exclusively a residence hall. Built in the Neoclassical style, Willard is constructed of brick with a concrete foundation. It consists of three stories, a low basement and seven symmetrical bays on the front facade. The roof is hipped and covered in metal standing seam roofing materials. The primary porch is of full height and constructed in the Greek Revival style. It consists of twelve Ionic columns, a half railing around the porch and a dentiled cornice on the porch roof. This building is significant because as one of the three original buildings of the school it set the standard for the architecture that would follow in the development of the University.


Woodward Campus Center (1986)

Woodard Campus Center, completed in 1986, has served as the hub of student activities on campus. The center is home to the Eagle's Nest (UMW's food court), the campus post office, EagleOne ID Card center, automatic teller machine, the "Wash Room" space for games and recreation, commuting student lockers, commuting student lounge (Tan Room), the Great Hall (location for concerts and special events), and several meeting and conference rooms, including the Red Room. Built in a modern style with some classical features, the Woodward Campus Center is constructed out of brick, concrete block and steel frame. It consists of three stories, and a partially gabled roof. An arcade runs along the front of the building covering campus walk.

Subpages (1): Combs-Private