Syllabus

Course Syllabus AP Music Theory

Instructor: Mike Bright

Text: Stefan Kostka, Dorthy Payne, Byron Almen. Tonal Harmony. Seventh edition McGraw-Hill Publishers, 2013, 2009, 2004

Materials for dictation and sight-singing are teacher generated. Testing materials and additional worksheets are teacher generated. These will include part-writing, aural skills, rhythmic and melodic sight-reading quizzes, worksheets, and tests. They will be formatted similarly to the AP Music Theory exam.

Supplemental test examples:

Nancy Scoggin. AP Music Theory. Barron’s Educational Series, Inc., 2010, 2014

Course Outline

The AP® Music Theory class meets during 2nd period five days a week for 36 weeks with each class period lasting fifty minutes. This syllabus is organized week by week following the text with minor changes in chapter organization. There will be visual and aural exercises for each new skill acquired throughout this course. Students will demonstrate mastery of the material through exercises, tests, quizzes, sight-singing, ear-training, dictation and composition. Ear Training and Sight-Singing sessions will not only include new material, but will incorporate review of previously covered material at all times. Written homework/class work assignments will be given at each class meeting. Throughout the course, appropriate vocal and instrumental repertoire will be studied, often within the textbook itself. Quizzes and tests will be given for each chapter and will be teacher generated or taken form the text itself. Comprehensive teacher generated sight-singing will also be given for each chapter .

Materials Needed

Every student is expected to have all supplies, books, and notes at every class period. Here is a list of supplies that students must provide for themselves:

    • A 1 1⁄2 -2” 3-Ring Binder (to keep all class work and notes in)
    • Several sharpened #2 pencils (pens are not allowed in this class)
    • A set of sharpened colored pencils or highlighters.
    • A staff paper notebook (if a notebook cannot be purchased, staff paper can be generated on a computer)
      • Here is a list materials provided for the students: • Textbooks/Workbooks
      • • Worksheets
    • Access to pianos and CD players
    • Listening CDs to accompany assignments Course Objectives

Upon completion of the AP Music Theory Course, the students will gain proficient knowledge in the following areas of music and be able to demonstrate this knowledge through written and aural means:

    • Fundamentals – musical terminology, notation, scales (major, minor, pentatonic, whole-tone, chromatic, and modal), keys, tonality, intervals, transposition, and chords.
    • Melody – composing and using melodies as an integral part in studying harmony.
    • Voice Leading – analytical skills in proper voice leading to provide music with the essential ebb and
      • flow from one chord to another.
    • Harmony – clear perception of the “vertical” aspect of music.
    • Texture – understanding how chord and non-chord tones affect the texture of music.
    • Harmonic Progression – functional harmony in the baroque through romantic periods
    • Form – identifying various forms in music such as binary and ternary form.
    • Analysis – the “backbone” of this course will be included in almost every aspect of it through
      • realizations of Roman numeral progressions
      • Music Theory and Technology
      • Although the curriculum described in the AP Music Theory Course Description will be followed, students will also be exposed to some of the wonderful music technology available to us. Throughout this AP course the students will acquire knowledge on computer generated music, and composition software. The students will be able to turn in assignments, post comments, ask for help, and communicate with others in the class through their school network accounts.
      • Grading Policy
      • In AP Music Theory, the grade percentage will be determined by dividing the points earned by the points possible. The grading scale will be 0-69% F, 70 D, 71-79% C, 80-89% B, and 90% and above A. Final Exams will be 20% of the overall grade, as set by our County School Board.
      • Course Planner
      • Weeks 1-2
      • Preface: Developing the “hearing eye” and “seeing ear”
      • Introduction: Sound, vibration, four properties of sound
      • Chapter 1: Elements of Pitch
      • Octave registers, major scales, major key signatures, minor scales, minor key signatures, scale degree names, pentatonic scale, whole tone scale, intervals, (perfect, major, minor and minor) intervals, augmented intervals, diminished intervals, inversions of intervals, consonant harmonic intervals, dissonant harmonic intervals.
      • Ear Training: melodic and harmonic intervals, and rhythmic dictation. Drill scales and key signatures Sight-Singing: melodies in stepwise motion
      • Week 3
      • Chapter 2: Elements of Rhythm
      • Rhythm, durational symbols, beat, tempo, meter, division of the beat, simple time signatures, and compound time signatures
      • Ear Training: melodic and harmonic intervals, and rhythmic dictation. Drill scales and key signatures Sight-Singing: melodies in stepwise motion
      • Chapter 3: Introduction to Triads and Seventh Chords
      • Triads, Seventh Chords, Inversions of Chords, Inversion Symbols and Figured Bass, Lead-Sheet Symbols, Recognizing Chords in Various Textures
    • Week 4

Ear Training: identifying melodic and harmonic intervals, identifying modes through use of interval relations. Continue to drill scales and key signatures

Sight-Singing: melodies in stepwise motion

Week 5

Chapter 4: Diatonic Chords in Major and Minor Keys

Diatonic Triads in Major, Minor Scale, Diatonic Triads in Minor, Diatonic Seventh Chords in Major, Diatonic Seventh Chords in Minor

Ear Training: identifying melodic and harmonic intervals, identifying modes through use of interval relations. Continue to drill scales and key signatures

Sight-Singing: melodies in stepwise motion

Week 6

Chapter 5: Principals of Voice Leading

The Melodic Line, Notating Chords, Voicing A Single Triad, Parallel Motion

Ear Training: continue drilling melodic and harmonic intervals, triads using Roman numerals, and melodic dictation

Sight-Singing: melodies major/minor with triadic skips

Week 7

Chapter 6: Root Position Part Writing

Root Position Part Writing with Repeated Roots, Root Position Part Writing with Roots a 4th and 5th Apart, Root Position Part Writing with Roots a 3rd and 6th Apart, Root Position Part Writing with Roots a 2nd and 7th Apart Ear Training: continue drilling melodic and harmonic intervals, triads using Roman numerals, and melodic dictation

Sight-Singing: melodies major/minor with triadic skips

Week 8

Chapter 7: Harmonic Progression and the Sequence

Sequences and the Circle of Fifths, The I and V Chords, The II Chord, The VI Chord, The III Chord, The VII Chord, The IV Chord, Common Exceptions, Differences in Minor Mode, Progressions of the Seventh Chords, Harmonizing a Simple Melody

Ear Training: various musical samples of cadences – continue drilling melodic and harmonic intervals, triads using Roman numerals

Sight-Singing: arpeggios, and simple 4-part exercises

Week 9

Not in Book - Species Writing

Ear Training: identifying different textures within a composition Sight-Singing: arpeggios, and difficult single line exercises

Week 10

Chapter 8: Triads in First Inversion

Bass Arpeggiation, Substitued First Inversion Triads, Inversions in Lead Sheets, Parallel Sixth Chords, Part Writing First Inversion Triads, Soprano – Bass Counterpoint

Ear Training: Listening to Bach Chorales and melodic dictation

Sight-Singing: class singing of 4-part material

Week 11

Chapter 9: Triads in Second Inversion

Bass Arpeggiation and the Melodic Bass, The Cadential Six-Four, The Passing Six-Four, The Pedal Six-Four, Part Writing for Second Inversion Triads

Ear Training: Listening to Bach Chorales and melodic dictation

Sight-Singing: class singing of 4-part material

Week 12

Chapter 10: Cadences, Phrases, Periods, and Sentences

Musical Form, Cadences, Cadences and Harmonic Rhythm, Motives and Phrases, Period Forms, The Sentence Ear Training: Listening to Bach Chorales and melodic dictation

Sight-Singing: class singing of 4-part material, and difficult single line exercises

Week 13

Chapter 11: Non-chord Tones

Classification of Nonchord Tones, Passing Tones, Neighboring Tones, Suspensions and Retardations, Embellishing a Simple Texture, Figured-Bass and Lead-Sheet Symbols

Ear Training: Listening to Bach Chorales and easy harmonic dictation

Sight-Singing: class singing of 4-part material, and difficult single line exercises

Special Project: Composition assignment – there should be enough vocabulary and theory learned by now for each student to creatively write their own short composition. I will establish the parameters for this assignment, but you will be the composer! All compositions will be due by the end of the term.

Week 14

Chapter 12: Non-chord Tones II

Appoggiaturas, Escape Tones, The Neighbor Group, Anticipations, The Pedal Point, Special Problems in the Analysis of Nonchord Tones

Ear Training: harmonic dictation

Sight-Singing: class singing of 4-part material, and difficult single line exercises

Week 15

Chapter 13: The V7 Chord

General Voice-Leading, The Approach to the 7th, The V7 in Root Position, The V7 in Three Parts, other Resolutions of the V7, The Inverted V7, V6/5, V4/3, V 4/2

Ear Training: harmonic dictation

Sight-Singing: class singing of 4-part material, and difficult single line exercises

Week 16

Chapter 14: The II7 and VII7 Chords

The II7 Chord, The VII7 in Major, The VII7 in Minor

Ear Training: Listening to Bach Chorales and easy harmonic dictation Sight-Singing: class singing of 4-part material, and difficult single line exercises

Week 17

Chapter 15: Other Diatonic Seventh Chords

IV7, VI7, I7, and III7 Chords

Ear Training: Listening to Bach Chorales and easy harmonic dictation Sight-Singing: class singing of 4-part material, and difficult single line exercises

Week 18

Chapter 16: Secondary Functions I

Chromaticism and Altered Chords, Secondary Functions of Tonicization, Secondary Dominant Chords, Spelling Secondary Dominants, Recognizing Secondary Dominants and Their Context

Ear Training: Listening to Bach Chorales and easy harmonic dictation

Sight-Singing: class singing of 4-part material, and difficult single line exercises

Week 19

Chapter 17: Secondary Functions II

Spelling and Recognizing Secondary Leading-Tone Chords and Their Context, Sequences Involving Secondary Functions

Ear Training: Listening to Bach Chorales and easy harmonic dictation

Sight-Singing: class singing of 4-part material, and difficult single line exercises

Week 20

Chapter 18: Modulations Using Diatonic Common Chords

Modulation and Change of Key, Modulation and Tonicization, Key Relationships, Common-Chord Modulation, Analyzing Common-Chord Modulation

Ear Training: Listening to Bach Chorales and easy harmonic dictation

Sight-Singing: class singing of 4-part material, and difficult single line exercises

Week 21

Chapter 19: Some other Modulatory Techniques

Altered Chords as Common Chords, Sequential Modulation, Modulation by Common Tone, Monophonic Modulation, Direct Modulation

Ear Training: Listening to Bach Chorales and easy harmonic dictation

Sight-Singing: class singing of 4-part material, and difficult single line exercises

Week 22

Chapter 20: Larger Forms

Formal Terminology, Binary Forms, Ternary Forms, Rounded Binary Forms, 12 Bar Blues, Other Forms in Ternary Design, Sonata Form, Rondo Form

Ear Training: Listening to Jazz Forms; Listening to Bach Chorales and easy harmonic dictation Sight-Singing: class singing of 4-part material, and difficult single line exercises

Week 23

Chapter 21

Mode Mixture and the Neapolitan

Borrowed Chords in Minor and Major, Neapolitan Chord, Modulations Involving Mode Mixture and the Neapolitan

Ear Training: Listening to Wagner; Listening to Bach Chorales and easy harmonic dictation Sight-Singing: class singing of 4-part material, and difficult single line exercises

Week 24

Chapter 22

Augmented Sixth Chords

The Interval of the Augmented Sixth, The Italian Augmented Sixth Chord, The French Augmented Sixth Chord, The German Augmented Sixth Chord

Ear Training: Listening to Bach Chorales and easy harmonic dictation

Sight-Singing: class singing of 4-part material, and difficult single line exercises

Week 25 Chapter 23

Enharmonic Spellings and Enharmonic Modulations

Enharmonic Spellings, Enharmonic Reinterpretation, Enharmonic Modulations Using the Major-Minor Seventh Sonority, Enharmonic Modulations Using the Diminished Seventh Chord

Ear Training: Listening to Bach Chorales and easy harmonic dictation

Sight-Singing: class singing of 4-part material, and difficult single line exercises

Week 26

Chapter 24 - 25

Further Elements of the Harmonic Vocabulary

The Dominate with a Substituted (6th, raised 5th), 9th, 11th, and 13th Chords, The Common-Tone Diminished Seventh Chord, Counter Point and Voice Leading

Ear Training: Listening to Bach Chorales and easy harmonic dictation

Sight-Singing: class singing of 4-part material, and difficult single line exercises

Week 27

Review Part One Chapters 1 – 4

Week 28 - 29 Review Part Two Chapters 5 – 12

Week 30

Review Part 3 Chapters 13 – 15

Week 31

Review Part 4 Chapters 16 – 20 Week 31

Review Part 5 Chapters 21 -25

Week 32

**AP Music Theory Exam Monday, May 8, 2017

Final Projects