Biology: 2017-2018

CLICK HERE FOR MCAS REVIEW RESOURCES

Element Presentations

posted Jun 15, 2018, 6:18 AM by Tiffany Floria

Polonium Dillon Sawyer

Element PowerPoint Project All about fluorine

Untitled presentation

Cody Waterman - Chemistry Presentation Project

Ryan Gorham - Chemistry Presentation Project

Ruthenium - Vincenzo Lombardi

Riley Amistadi - Chemistry Presentation Project

Nicholas Giardino - Chemistry Presentation Project


Ethan Evans Boron

Erbium Max Jacques

Rylie Jean - Chemistry Presentation Project

mercury presentation

Aluminium

Morgan Lafrennie - Chemistry Presentation Project

Sulfur Presentation. Emma Lyons

Einsteinium Joe S


Jacob Koivula - Chemistry Presentation Project

Krypton Devan Waskiewicz

Linsey Ludwig - Chemistry Presentation Project

Magnesium

Chemistry Project - Madison Faneuf

Andrew LeBlanc - Chemistry Presentation Project

Uranium

Arsenic


Cellular Respiration Review

posted Apr 2, 2018, 5:40 PM by Tiffany Floria

Cellular Respiration Notes

Cellular respiration is the process of using oxygen in the mitochondria to chemically break down organic molecules such as glucose to release the energy stored in its bonds. In the process molecules of water and carbon dioxide are released as waste products. Some of the energy is used to make Adenosine triphosphate, ATP, from Adenosine diphosphate and phosphate. ATP is the main energy currency of cells.

 

Below is the structural Formula for ATP (from Wikipedia). Notice the three phosphate molecules on the left. To release energy, one phosphate is removed leaving ADP. To store energy, the phosphate is replaced and ADP is restored to ATP.

Structural Formula for ATP; notice the three phosphate molecules on the left; to release energy, one phosphate is removed leaving ADP; to store energy, the phosphate is replaced and ADP is restored to ATP


Heterotrophs as well as autotrophs utilize cellular respiration to supply the energy to power cellular activities. To understand cellular respiration, one must understand the principles of photosynthesisWhy do you think that is so?

 

PHOTOSYNTHESIS EQUATION:

 

Image of photosynthesis equation  

 

 

CELLULAR RESPIRATION EQUATION:

Image of cell respiration equation

 

Cellular Respiration begins with a biochemical pathway called GLYCOLYSIS. This is a process in which one molecule of glucose is broken in half by enzymes in the cytoplasm, producing 2 molecules of pyruvic acid and only 2 molecules of ATP. Glycolysis releases a relatively small amount of the energy stored in glucose.

Diagram for glycolysis

If oxygen is present, glycolysis acts as the first step for 2 more processes, the Krebs Cycle and the electron transport chain. This series of reactions produces 36 molecules of ATP!

 

All processes that require oxygen are described as "aerobic". Cellular respiration is an aerobic process.


If sufficient oxygen is not present in the cell, glycolysis is followed by a different pathway called fermentation.  Fermentation does not produce much energy.    

 

Processes that do not require oxygen are "anaerobic" processes. Fermentation is an anaerobic process.


The following drawing depicts the events of  fermentation.  Notice that glycolysis is the first step in the process that results in 2 molecules of ethanol alcohol.

Diagram for process of fermentation

 

Cellular Respiration - Aerobic Processes

 

You can draw an analogy between the process of cellular respiration in your cells and a car. The mitochondria represent the engines of our cells where sugar is burned for fuel and the exhaust is CO2 and H2O. Note that in a car that burned fuel perfectly, the only exhaust should theoretically be CO2 and H2O also.

 

There are 3 steps in the process of cellular respiration:

  • glycolysis,
  • the Krebs Cycle, and
  • the electron transport chain.

 

1. Aerobic respiration – occurs when the two pyruvic acid molecules from glycolysis are modified and diffuse into the mitochondria where the next two processes occur.

a. The Krebs Cycle, also known as the Citric Acid Cycle, produces 2 ATP molecules, 10 energy carrier molecules, and CO2 from each glucose molecule. These energy carriers move on to the next step.

Diagram of cell respiration

b. The Electron Transport Chain is a series of chemical reactions that produces 34 ATP molecules and H2O from the carrier molecules that were produced in the Krebs Cycle.

Glucose is converted to pyruvate through a series of reactions that use 2 molecules of ATP and produce 4 molecules, for a net gain of 2 ATP.? Pyruvate enters the mitochondrion and is processed through the Krebs cycle; products from Krebs, diffuse through the inner mitochondrial membranes in the electron transport chain.? Oxygen atoms accept Hydrogen ions and form water to remove the hydrogen ions.


Glucose is converted to pyruvate through a series of reactions that use 2 molecules of ATP and produce 4 molecules, for a net gain of 2 ATP.  Pyruvate enters the mitochondrion and is processed through the Krebs Cycle; products from Krebs, diffuse through the inner mitochondrial membranes in the electron transport chain.  Oxygen atoms accept Hydrogen ions and form water to remove the hydrogen ions.

Remember exploring the organelles that are found in a cell? We learned about an organelle called the mitochondrion--the Powerhouse of the cell. Here's how that organelle got its nickname. The bulk of a cell's ATP is produced in the mitochondria.

Image of mitochondrion and link to Wikipedia entry on the topic


To be energy efficient, particles must move through the membrane with little energy expense.

Electron transport produces an uneven charge on the mitochondria membrane. This allows protons to move through the membrane by electrical charge attraction rather than by using energy. Protons now move through the membrane and are used by ATP synthase enzyme to recycle ADP molecules and phosphate molecules to produce ATP.  

 

2. Anaerobic respiration - Fermentation is an Anaerobic Process. There are several forms of fermentation. Two of these forms are lactic acid fermentation and alcoholic fermentation.

  • Lactic acid fermentation: Occurs in animal cells when there is no oxygen available. Pyruvic acid is converted into a waste product called lactic acid. When lactic acid builds up in tissues, it causes muscle soreness. This causes the burning sensation in your muscles.
  • Alcoholic fermentation: Occurs in some plants and unicellular organisms such as yeast and bacteria. The process converts pyruvic acid into ethyl alcohol and a carrier compound (giving off CO2), which allows glycolysis to continue. This process occurs when making bread, beer, and wine.

Comparing energy yield:

Aerobic respiration (with oxygen) can produce 36 ATP molecules from each glucose molecule. Anaerobic respiration (without oxygen) only allows production of 2 ATP molecules from each glucose molecule. Therefore, aerobic respiration is significantly more efficient than anaerobic respiration.

3. Energy and Exercise

Cells normally contain small amounts of ATP produced during glycolysis and cellular respiration. At the start of a race, muscle cells only contain enough ATP for a few seconds of activity. When running a long race, muscle cells are producing most of their ATP by lactic acid fermentation. When the race is over, the only way to get rid of the extra lactic acid is to acquire more oxygen. This is known as an "oxygen debt" because oxygen must be "paid back" to the cells to remove the lactic acid. The debt is paid as you continue to breathe deeply for several moments after the activity stops.

 

For longer races, cellular respiration is the only way to generate a continuing supply of ATP. It releases energy more slowly than fermentation.

Glucose is converted first to pyruvate, then to lactic acid

 

In this image glucose is converted first to pyruvate, then to lactic acid. This image was based on a diagram published at Estrella MountainCommunity College.

4. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESPIRATION

Have you answered the earlier question about why you need to understand the principles of photosynthesis to fully understand cellular respiration? These two processes are the reverse of each other. Water, carbon dioxide, carbohydrates and oxygen cycle between these two processes. Energy moves through both processes in one direction

Click here for a pdf version of the chart below. 

Chart comparing photosynthesis to respiration--this image is also a link to a pdf containing the tabel and its information





SOURCE: https://students.ga.desire2learn.com/d2l/lor/viewer/viewFile.d2lfile/1798/12844/photosynthesis4.html


Week Schedule for 4/2 - 4/6

posted Mar 29, 2018, 10:31 AM by Tiffany Floria

CP Biology (02)

Monday: 4/2/18
PART 2 of Respiration Lab - Anaerobic Respiration Data Collection

Tuesday: 4/3/18 (Lab Block)
Formal Lab Report - you will be given 2 full class blocks to write up your cellular respiration formal report. DUE BY END OF DAY TOMORROW

Wednesday: 4/4/18
Review for test tomorrow.
Lab report DUE TODAY.

Thursday: 4/5/18 (Lab Block)
You will be given 2 full class blocks to take the test. NOTES ARE NOT ALLOWED! MAKE SURE YOU STUDY AND REVIEW.

Notebooks & the following assignments will be collected - Remember to keep up with your notebook assignments so you do not have to rush all in one day to get caught up!

Paper Review Assignments to be Collected
  • Cellular Respiration Reading Guide
  • Photosynthesis Reading Guide

Notebook Assignments Should include:
  • Questions 1-5 on page 203 & questions 1-5 on page 207 (study guide section)
  • Definitions to vocabulary listed on page 201 and 204 (study guide section)
  • Questions 1-5 on page 214 (study guide section)
  • Lab Section: Photosynthesis Lab
  • Lab Section: Cellular Respiration Lab
Friday: 4/6/18 LAST DAY OF 3rd QUARTER!
We will start the next topic: Mitosis & Meiosis

Note that the assignment "Social Media Project" listed in last week's email has been canceled due to lack of time.

REVIEW OF UPCOMING DUE DATES
  • 4/4/18 - respiration lab report
  • 4/5/18 - Test Photosynthesis & Cellular Respiration
  • 4/5/18 - NOTEBOOK & Assignment Collection

CP BIOLOGY (03)

Monday: 4/2/18 (Lab Block)
Formal Lab Report - you will be given 2 full class blocks to write up your cellular respiration formal report. DUE BY END OF DAY TOMORROW

Tuesday: 4/3/18 
Review for test tomorrow.
Lab report DUE TODAY.

Wednesday: 4/4/18 (Lab Block)
You will be given 2 full class blocks to take the test. NOTES ARE NOT ALLOWED! MAKE SURE YOU STUDY AND REVIEW.

Notebooks & the following assignments will be collected - Remember to keep up with your notebook assignments so you do not have to rush all in one day to get caught up!

Paper Review Assignments to be Collected
  • Cellular Respiration Reading Guide
  • Photosynthesis Reading Guide

Notebook Assignments Should include:
  • Questions 1-5 on page 203 & questions 1-5 on page 207 (study guide section)
  • Definitions to vocabulary listed on page 201 and 204 (study guide section)
  • Questions 1-5 on page 214 (study guide section)
  • Lab Section: Photosynthesis Lab
  • Lab Section: Cellular Respiration Lab
Thursday: 4/5/18 
We will start the next topic: Mitosis & Meiosis

Friday: 4/6/18 LAST DAY OF 3rd QUARTER!
Mitosis & Meiosis Activity


Note that the assignment "Social Media Project" listed in last week's email has been canceled due to lack of time.

REVIEW OF UPCOMING DUE DATES
  • 4/3/18 - respiration lab report
  • 4/4/18 - Test Photosynthesis & Cellular Respiration
  • 4/4/18 - NOTEBOOK & Assignment Collection

Energy, ATP & Photosynthesis

posted Mar 23, 2018, 6:16 AM by Tiffany Floria   [ updated Mar 24, 2018, 6:56 AM ]

Energy and ATP & Photosynthesis

Energy is the ability to do work or cause change.

In Science, when we use the word work, we're talking about moving something against a force. The key word here is moving--going from one place or position to another--and having to overcome a force to get there. The distance of the movement can be quite large (moving a rocket from the face of the earth to the moon or beyond...say, across the universe) or the distance can be very, very small (the space between a couple of molecules or from one cell to another). Whatever the distance, if we have to act against a force in order to move something from one place to another, work is being done.

A person dragging a heavy load from one spot to another location is work.

Image of man dragging a box--an example of work

 

So, work isthe ability to change or move matter against other forces.

 

Work is done when a net force causes an object to change its state of motion or rest, causing it to speed up, slow down, or change direction. The direction of the applied force and the direction that the object moves must be the same for work to be done. The amount of work done is proportional to the size of the force and the distance that the object moves. The formula used to calculate work is

 

Work = Force x distance
w=Fd

 

Work for a Cell includes

  • Growth and Repair,
  • Active Transport
  • Reproduction. 

All of which require ENERGY.

 

The ultimate source of energy for ALL organisms is the sun. Photosynthetic organisms convert the energy from sunlight into chemical energy that is stored in food. Heterotrophic organisms obtain energy from food but different types of organisms get their food in many different ways.

 

Most AUTOTROPHS or PRODUCERS use PHOTOSYNTHESIS, to convert the energy in SUNLIGHT, CARBON DIOXIDE, and WATER into chemical energy or FOOD. (GLUCOSE)

 

We can write the overall reaction for photosynthesis as:

6H2O + 6CO2 C6H12O6+ 6O2

 

Most of us don't speak chemicalese, so the above chemical equation translates as:

Six molecules of water plus six molecules of carbon dioxide produce one molecule of sugar (called glucose) plus six molecules of oxygen.

The foods made by AUTOTROPHS are stored in various organic compounds, primarily CARBOHYDRATES. One of the most important carbohydrates is a six carbon sugar called GLUCOSE.
 

  • Plants, algae, and some prokaryotes (Bacteria) are examples of Autotrophs.
  • Without Autotrophs, all other living things would DIE. Without PRODUCERS you cannot have CONSUMERS.
  • Autotrophs not only make food for their own use, but store a great deal of food for use by other organisms (CONSUMERS).
  • Most autotrophs use ENERGY from the SUN to make their food, but there are a few organisms deep in the ocean that obtain energy from INORGANIC COMPOUNDS. (CHEMOSYNTHESIS)
  • Organisms that CANNOT make their own food are called HETEROTROPHS OR CONSUMERS. Heterotrophs include animals, fungi, and many unicellular organisms, that stay alive by EATING AUTOTROPHS or other HETEROTROPHS.

 Because Heterotrophs must consume other organisms to get energy, they are also called CONSUMERS.

Image depicting various levels of consumers and one level of producer


Only part of the energy from the sun is used by Autotrophs to make food, and only part of that energy can be passed on to other Consumers. A great deal of the energy is LOST as heat.

Enough energy is passed from Autotroph to Heterotroph to give the Heterotroph the energy it needs.

 

Chemical Energy and ATP

The activities of the cell are powered by a chemical fuel called adenosine triphosphate (also known as ATP). 

An ATP molecule is made up of adenine, ribose (a sugar), and three phosphate groups.

Image of an ATP Molecule

 

Adenosine diphosphate (also known as ADP) is similar to ATP, except it only has 2 phosphate molecules. 

The difference in the 2 molecules is the way they store energy.  When a cell has energy available, it can store small amounts of energy by adding a phosphate group to and ADP molecule.  This will then produce an ATP molecule.

ATP will release or give off energy when it releases a phosphate molecule.  Since a cell can add or subtract a phosphate group, it has a way of storing and releasing energy.

Most cells have only a small amount of ATP.  It can't be used to store energy for long periods of time.    It is more efficient for a cell to keep a small supply of ATP.  Cells can regenerate ATP from ADP as needed by using the energy in carbohydrates like glucose.

 



Inside a Chloroplast

A photosynthetic cell contains anywhere from one to several thousand chloroplasts. A chloroplast has two membranes. The inner membrane is folded into many layers.  A chloroplast's inner membrane layers fuse along the edges to form thylakoids. (Thylakoids are disk shaped structures that contain photosynthetic pigments.)

Image depicting the interior of a chloroplast  

Each thylakoid is a closed compartment surrounded by a central space. The thylakoids are surrounded by a gel like material called the stroma. The neatly folded layers of the thylakoids that resemble stacks of pancakes are called grana. The thylakoids are interconnected and are layered on top of one another to form the stacks of grana. (Each chloroplast may contain hundreds or more grana.)

 OVERVIEW OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS

Photosynthesis is the process that provides energy for almost all life. During photosynthesis, autotrophs use the sun's energy to make carbohydrate molecules from water and carbon dioxide, releasing oxygen as a byproduct.
The Process of PHOTOSYNTHESIS can be summarized by the following equation:

Equation showing water plus carbon dioxide plus energy in the form of light yeilds glucose and oxygen

 (Notice that the water is split to release oxygen; its hydrogen becomes part of the glucose; the carbon dioxide re-forms to include the hydrogen and makes glucose!)

RATE OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS

The rate at which a plant can carry out photosynthesis is affected by the plant's environment. Three things in the plant's environment affect the rate of photosynthesis:

  1. Light Intensity: this is one of the most important factors. As light intensity increases, the rate of photosynthesis initially increases and then levels off to a plateau.
  2. CO2 Levels: Increasing the level of CO2 stimulates photosynthesis until the rate reaches a plateau.
  3. Temperature: Raising the temperature accelerates the chemical reactions involved in photosynthesis. The rate of photosynthesis increases as temperature increases. The rate of photosynthesis generally peaks at a certain temperature, and photosynthesis begins to decrease when the temperature is further increased.

Photosynthesis is an important process. You need as many opportunities as possible to understand what happens when plants harness light to make fuel. PBS's Illuminating Photosynthesis is an excellent resource for exploring why and how photosynthesis works.  Be sure to try the Puzzlers activities at the end! Click the image below to access



Photosynthesis


ATP & ADP





Photosynthesis Study Guide

Click here for a printable version of the study guide. 

Autotrophs and Heterotrophs

1. Where does the energy of food originally come from?

2. Complete the table of types of organisms.

types of organisms

Type

Description

Examples

 

Organisms that make their own food

 

 

Organisms that obtain energy from the food they eat

 

 

Chemical Energy and ATP


3
. What is one of the principal chemical compounds that living things use to store energy?

4. How is ATP different from ADP? 

5. Be able to label each part of the ATP molecule illustrated below.

Unlabeled ATP molecule                                 

6. When a cell has energy available, how can it store small amounts of that energy?

7. When is the energy stored in ATP released? 

  
ATP and Glucose

8. Identify the molecules used to regenerate the energy in ATP.

a. ADP

b. phosphates

c. carbohydrates

d. organelles

  

The Photosynthesis Equation

9. Write the overall equation for photosynthesis using words. 

10. Write the overall equation for photosynthesis using chemical formulas.

11. Photosynthesis uses the energy of sunlight to convert water and carbon dioxide into oxygen and high-energy___________.

 

Light and Pigments

12 What does photosynthesis require in addition to water and carbon dioxide? 
13.
 What is the principal pigment of plants? 

 
Inside a Chloroplast

14. Chloroplasts contain saclike photosynthetic membranes called __________________.
15.
 What is a granum?  
16.
 The region outside the thylakoid membranes in the chloroplasts is called the_____________.
17.
 What are the two stages of photosynthesis called?

 

Factors Affecting Photosynthesis

18. What are three factors that affect the rate at which photosynthesis occurs? 

19. Is the following sentence true or false? Increasing the intensity of light decreases the rate of photosynthesis. 

 

INFORMATION SOURCE: Georgia Virtual Learning Shared Content

Schedule for the remainder of the year....

posted Mar 15, 2018, 9:57 AM by Tiffany Floria

A tentative schedule of topics and Exam dates has been made. This is a schedule of all of the remaining topics required to be prepared for the upcoming MCAS exam on June 6th & 7th. As a reminder - successful completion of this exam is required to be eligible for a high school diploma. be sure you are reviewing your Biology every day!

See Google Classroom for the document that outlines the topics and dates. 

Respiratory System Virtual Station Lab

posted Mar 8, 2018, 4:13 PM by Tiffany Floria   [ updated Mar 8, 2018, 4:39 PM ]

READ IT: Attach a copy of the reading to your booklet, and answer the questions that follow in your booklet.


Questions:
1. Why do smokers have a more difficult time getting rid of bronchitis?
2. What are some symptoms of acute bronchitis?
3. Which is the most common respiratory issue?
4. Write a short summary of the reading.


WATCH IT: Watch the video below, and answer the questions that follow in your booklet


1. Explain what the process of respiration is.
2. List at least 6 of the organs or structures which exist in the respiratory system.
3. When we exercise why do we breath harder?
4. Write a short summary that describes what you learned from the video. 



RESEARCH IT: Use the website link below and answer the questions that follow in your booklet.


1. Read the first paragraph and summarize the structure (parts) and function of the Respiratory System.
2. Scroll towards the bottom and summarize the transportation of gases in the human body.


EXPLORE IT: Use the diagrams below to answer the questions that follow.



























1. After looking at the diagram, what role do you think the respiratory system has?
2. What organs and components (parts) make up the respiratory system?
3. Some of the main organs and components are listed on the following cards. Use diagram #2 to locate them. In your booklet - record the functions of each organ.
    
    Lungs – the main organ in the system. Each lung expands and contracts as gases are brought in and     out of the body. 
    
    Larynx – also called the voice box. It allows the body to produce sounds and speech. 

    Trachea – 5-inch long tube that allows air to easily enter and exit the lungs

    Bronchi – these tubes split off from the trachea and head towards each of the two lungs. 

    Alveoli – are tiny sacs within our lungs that allow oxygen and carbon dioxide to move between the lungs and bloodstream. 

    Diaphragm– muscle below the lungs. When it contracts the lungs expand allowing air to flow into the lungs.

4. Watch the video below and answer the questions that follow in your booklet.


1. What controls the movement of the lungs?
2. From largest to smallest, how are the airways structured?
3. ________ drives O2 and CO2 across the capillaries and air sacs in the lungs.
4. How do the lungs get rid of all the CO2 they've picked up from the blood?
5. Why do you think the body's cells need oxygen?
6. Why is it better that the lungs are spongy rather than empty like a balloon?
7. How do you think your breathing and lungs adapt when you're exercising?


ILLUSTRATE IT: 
1. Use the colored pencils to draw a sketch of the Respiratory System. 
2. You must label the lungs, oral cavity, nasal cavity, larynx, trachea, bronchus, bronchioles, and diaphragm. (You may use the diagram below for help) 
3. Off to the side of the diagram list the specific function of the respiratory system.




ORGANIZE IT: See Mrs. Floria for the diagram pieces. Use the 6 labels and place them into pairs at the correct place on the diagram. Use the arrows to point to the part. Attach to your booklet.



WRITE IT: Answer the questions below in your booklet:

1. Explain the respiratory system including the structures involved and the function of the system.
2. How does the respiratory system work directly with the circulatory system?
3. Plants give off oxygen as part of photosynthesis. Explain the impact of this process to humans.



ASSESS IT: Answer the questions below in your booklet:

1. How does the diaphragm aide in breathing?
2. What part(s) of the respiratory system are shared with other systems? Explain what other system the part(s) are involved in.
3. How do plants benefit from human respiration?
4. The Respiratory System works directly with the _____________ system to exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide in the lungs.

Circulatory System Station Lab

posted Feb 27, 2018, 6:09 PM by Tiffany Floria   [ updated Mar 6, 2018, 7:27 AM by Tiffany Floria ]

Organize Diagram

Explore it Diagram

Illustrate it Diagram




WATCH IT:

Reminder about Research Project!

posted Jan 26, 2018, 6:09 AM by Tiffany Floria

Hello all Bio Students!

REMINDER! Today was the last day of class time you were given to work on your research paper: "Prokaryotes, Eukaryotes, & Viruses Oh My!" (See Google Classroom stream for attachments related to this assignment). You have been provided with 3 days of class time to work on this assignment. Yesterday was one of my after school help days (Tuesday & Thursday after school) ... and no Biology students attended - so I expect that you did not have any unanswered questions? Pay careful attention to the rubric. The final research paper is due to be submitted into Google Classroom no later than Monday January 29th, 2018. I will be unable to respond to any questions or emails sent on Sunday, so DO NOT WAIT UNTIL THE LAST MINUTE if you have questions! YOU are responsible for your success!

Happy 1/2 Day!
Mrs. Floria

CP Biology Planner 1/24 - 2/2

posted Jan 24, 2018, 8:11 AM by Tiffany Floria

Good morning!

Today is the first day of 3rd quarter, and 2nd semester. Congratulations! You have made it to the halfway point!

Midterm exams will be posted and 2nd quarter grades and semester grades will be posted by the end of day tomorrow in schoolbrains. Report cards will be distributed in the next few days.

Let's start off 3rd quarter in the right direction! A new quarter means a clean slate, and your success is in your control. 
Be sure you are keeping up with your assignments, and study your notes and vocabulary for a minimum of 15 minutes each day, even if you do not have specific homework assigned. 
The topics that will be discussed 3rd and 4th quarter are complex and involved, and so it is crucial that you take the initiative to complete assignments, practice concepts, study, and ask for help when needed. Biology can be a challenging subject for many students - as it involves many new vocabulary, and abstract concepts. 

I have attached the planner for this and next week, which outlines our class agenda as well as upcoming assignments. Be sure to refer to this planner daily to stay on track.

I have also attached a copy of the MA State Biology Frameworks for you to take a look at. The highlighted concepts are the standards we have already covered in class, and those that are not highlighted are the standards we must complete prior to the MCAS exam in June. It is a lot of information, in a relatively short period of time, so your dedication and commitment is vital for your success. 

As a reminder, my help days are Tuesday & Thursday after school, and I encourage you to see me whenever you feel you need it. 

Finally, please remember that Friday is a 1/2 day - and we will be running a Wednesday schedule on that day.

Have a great week!
Mrs. Floria

CPBIO - Unit 4 Week 1: Cells




Biology Frameworks

Updated planner to reflect snow days.... MIDTERM DATES

posted Jan 9, 2018, 7:49 AM by Tiffany Floria

Good morning!

I just wanted to update the upcoming dates to reflect the snow days. 

Be sure to take a look at your class planner on Google Classroom.

Midterm Exams have been adjusted as follows:

Thursday, January 18 A & B (1/2 Day)
Friday, January 19 C & D (1/2 Day)
Monday, January 22  E & F (1/2 Day)
Tuesday, January 23 G & Make-up (1/2 Day)

Wednesday, January 24 First day of Term 3 (Semester II)

Stay Warm,

Mrs. Floria

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