Rome


There were a lot of laws that the Romans used and one of the laws we use today is the Law of Nations. In Rome, the law originated from “natural laws”. They were the first to create the idea of everyone having the same rights. In the Latin language, the  Romans called the Law of Nations “
ius gentium.” The Law of Nations states that everyone is born with natural rights and that criminals have the right to be given a fair trial. The law governs interactions between states.We have adopted this concept of all people having equal rights. It has influenced the Declaration of Independence and we still use it today.

Rome’s art, especially sculptures, continue to influence us today. They were influenced by Greek sculpture but instead of worrying about perfection in beauty, they focused on a more realistic approach. They embraced the imperfections on human bodies, and unlike the Greeks, they often showed women and children. They also carved more clothing on the figures than the Greeks are known for. The Romans are famous for their life-like busts that they carved. They mainly show the shoulders and above of important figures like emperors. Many of our presidents, including George Washington, were sculpted in very similar ways as the Romans did. He is even shown in clothing that ancient Romans used to wear. While sculpting humans is somewhat less popular today than it was in the ancient times, we still continue to use Roman ideas in our art.

                                                                      

                                                                        
          
    


 
MLA Citations: "Educational Materials for Law of Nations | Natural Law, Natural Rights, and American Constitutionalism." Educational Materials for Law of Nations | Natural Law, Natural Rights, and American Constitutionalism. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Sept. 2012.
"Declaration of Independence." Declaration of Independence. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Sept. 2012.



MLA Citations: Bower, Bert, and Jim Lobdell. History Alive! the Medieval World and beyond. Palo Alto, CA: Teachers' Curriculum Institute, 2004. Print.
                                                                                                               

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